K.C. DeRhodes House

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Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

The Gale house!
Of course.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Horner (1908) looks very much like Gale (1909) from the street façade, but there appears to be only the one exterior Horner photo to have survived, which is in Hitchcock, Storrer and Taschen (with no mention in Manson, Smith or Monographs). It may have had a flat roof, as it appears in the photo, but it is unlikely. Its relationship to Walser (1903), Barton (1903) and DeRhodes (1906) is so clear in the floor plan, that the roof was most likely hip. Yet as the last of the 4 'cousins,' it may have been altered by FLW, and used as a template for Gale, which is clearly an updated version of the plan, reducing the expansive stair hall of the earlier houses, and thereby enlarging the living room.

The kink in that history is the 1904 design date on the plans of Gale, with 1909 as the confirmed construction date. It seems odd that Horner could have been designed after Gale. The obvious implication is that Gale is one of those designs FLW gave a false date later on ... like the movie theater in San Diego.

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Some pics on the steinerag site give a hint of a hip roof atop Horner, though its pitch must have been shallow:

http://www.steinerag.com/flw/Artifact%2 ... Horner.htm

http://www.steinerag.com/flw/Artifact%2 ... -c1940.htm

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

We can always count on Steinerag to come up with answers. The fifth photo down shows the front door in the location depicted by Storrer's plan, rather than the Taschen plan.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The entrance was no doubt altered from the start, the colored plan depicting the ideal, the Storrer plan the built reality, which adds a useful and perhaps mandatory closet near the door.

The hipped roof to house and (roofed and enclosed) porch is clear in photos at Dan's second link.

SDR

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Tom »

Yellow box - this threw me for awhile.

Image

Avery File:
https://library.artstor.org/#/search/ar ... es=%5B5%5D

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Tom »

Not a cantilever:
Image

DRN
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Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by DRN »

This article was linked in Eric O'Malley's weekly staple Wright Society, but I thought I'd link it here too:

https://www.southbendtribune.com/story/ ... ociety_268

Be sure to click on the 24 photos in the article...they are well composed, the well lighted, all of a fully and meticulously restored house that could be yours...
https://savewright.org/building/derhode ... the-market

Tom
Posts: 3564
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Tom »

Frame 11/16 from the second link above shows a vaulted central hallway for the second floor.

Second, I know this is a question conditioned by "hindsight" yet it is interesting to ponder why the front terrace window is not doors that open. Raises questions of Wright's design development at this point. When did the flank of opening glass doors onto terraces come in?

Roderick Grant
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Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Roderick Grant »

With the door on the west wall, next to the fireplace, why should the south wall have doors?

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Tom »

When I saw that built condition my question was why have a door in the west corner when the south elevation could be all glass doors?

I don't know where in Wright's project chronology that the 'glass door series window wall' begins, but here seems like a good opportunity to employ it. Barton has no terrace and the rectangular framed window is understandable.
I'm not complaining about DeRhodes. Just wondering.
That framed punched window is still Sullivan - would you agree with that?
It kind of seems like maybe he is still holding on to Sullivan, not yet having thought of glass doors yet.
But it's a pure question, speculation only.
I have not looked closely at the other Wright projects that are in DeRhodes immediate context.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Roderick Grant »

It was a design choice. Look at Beachy, Tomek, Coonley (ground floor), Northome, and others, which have terraces accessed by out-of-the-way doors, not directly from a principal interior space. Then there are Millard, Evens, Gridley, Gilmore, Boynton, Balch, etc. where the terraces are directly connected with rows of doors. The difference between them is that in the former, the outdoor space wrapped around the principal façade to tight corners where a door could access the terrace as easily as from the principal wall of the living or dining room, while in the latter, there was no other access, only a window wall in the living or dining room. It seems he preferred the former solution.

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Tom »

Thanks - that's great.
Maybe part of the preference would be that where there is a framed window over terrace (no row of doors) the people inside the building can be up close to the wall: facing chairs, sideboard ...
Whereas if it's a row of doors the adjacent inside area has to be kept clear to access them.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by SDR »

Reading Roderick on that, we are reminded that the architect liked to lead the visitor to a goal by circuitous and informal (as opposed to frontal, even symmetrical) entry. Don't tell that to the owner of Goetsch-Winckler ? One thinks to, say, a Greek temple, where the visitor is invited to pass from exterior to interior via one of the inter-columnar opennings---but which one ?

It is amusing to see, on a Wright plan, a row, odd-numbered, of identical sash or french doors, and observe how he hinges the center opening . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: K.C. DeRhodes House

Post by Roderick Grant »

"Amusing"? Well, I don't know about that.... The single aperture out of 5 at Storer indicated to be the entrance, I have always considered a design flaw.

For the most circuitous route from sidewalk to confronting the fireplace at the heart of the house, the ten right-angled turns one makes at Emil Bach must take the cake.

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