Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

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SDR
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Besinger, Winter 1939:

"The caravan consisted of a stake-body truck, a pickup truck, a station wagon,
and four cars. In the caravan were "twenty three people, two dogs, one cat, and
'Lulu', Svetlana's pet macaw.""

Winter 1946:

"Late that afternoon, when some of us were still working in the drafting room,
a man, his wife, and his daughter started to enter the room. An apprentice intercepted
them and ushered them toward the point for an overall view of the camp.
But the little girl caught sight of Mrs. Wright's dog and started after it, heading
for the entrance to the camp. The man pursued his daughter, but when he caught
sight of Mr. and Mrs. Wright, who were just returning from Phoenix, he headed
for them instead. He followed them into the office, where he proceeded to . . ."

Summer 1948:

"Late in the summer of 1948 Gordon Lee decided to leave the Fellowship for
the second time. He had first joined the Fellowship in the summer of 1941 and
had left less than a year later, in January 1942, because he was told that he
could not keep a dog he had bought. He rejoined the Fellowship in January
1947 when he and Gordon Chadwick came to visit so that "Chad" could talk
with Mr. Wright about supervising the construction of the Friedman house in
Pecos, New Mexico."

Winter 1954:

"On the surface my relations with Mrs. Wright remained civil. But there were
several instances during the winter when the civility was interrupted. One of
these instances occurred early in December when a strange dog appeared in
camp. A group, including Mrs. Wright, had gathered around the dog and was
speculating about where it might have come from and what kind of dog it was. I
said that it was a weimaraner. Mrs. Wright immediately said that it wasn't, that
she knew a weimaraner when she saw one. Her tone of voice implied that she
was always right. In this instance she wasn't. However, she took a fancy to this
dog and after many telephone calls and trips to town involving Wes and Gene
she came to own either this dog or one just like it. (There was an air of deception
and mystery around the acquisition of the pet. To avoid Mr. Wright's anger over
buying an expensive dog, he was encouraged to believe that it was the same dog
that had appeared in camp.)"


I was able to find these quotes by searching "dog" in a downloaded version of Besinger's book:

https://1lib.us/book/16564919/16e7cf

S

SDR
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Lonnie Lovness continues the "tail" of the dogs at Taliesin, with an account of Olgivanna's Great Danes. While many of the happenings in her book, "Growing Up Wright," lack dates, this entry locates itself in time by paraphrasing the great lady herself, in the section called "Cheetah":

"Mrs Wright always had a dog; her preference was a large one. When her black Great Dane Fiera died she asked Mother [Virginia] if she could find another to replace it. Since Mr Wright had died, she told Mother, she had been so alone . . ."

The tale is lengthy and well worth the read (another plug to Wrightians---and others: Buy the book !) so I won't repeat it here. Suffice to say that Mrs Wright was very specific about what kind of Dane she wanted, and Mrs Lovness, true to form, went above and beyond to fill the need. Mrs Wright ended up with a faithful and pampered harlequin blue female she called Cheetah. The dog survived its owner by just a few months following Olgivanna's death in 1985.

S


Paul Ringstrom
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Rood
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Rood »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Wed Jul 28, 2021 10:42 am
The Conestoga House has some very interesting interiors. Not bad at all.

The "Offer to purchase" house is sort of Frank Lloyd Wright meets 21st Century upper middle-class Suburbia. Not bad, but not good, either.

The Art Deco Cat Doorstop makes me wonder ... not what FLW had to do with Art Deco, but what his attitude toward cats was. He loved farm animals, celebrated the Cow in his autobiography, but I cannot recall seeing him with an indoor pet of any kind. Olga had her dogs but that was after FLW was gone, wasn't it?
No. There is a photo of Mr. and Mrs. Wright taken outdoors at Taliesin, probably either in Fall or Winter . Standing beside them is a dog.


DavidC
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by DavidC »

1710 Casey Creek Rd - (2:15)


David

DavidC
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by DavidC »


DavidC
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/1416 ... 0971_zpid/

Pair of spindled armchairs---as at Purcell-Cutts house, Minneapolis, 1913. See "Prairie Style," Legler and Korab, 1999, pp 118-19.

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Roderick Grant »

Rising Sun may have been inspired by a Japanese pagoda, but in the hands of Ralph Adams Cram, it became unavoidably Victorian. Nevertheless, it is charming. I would like to know how Cram, a mere 4 years older than Wright, influenced FLW's architecture.

I would call the Ypsilanti house "Mixed Metaphors."

SDR
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

Heh-heh. The house has its moments---including but not confined to the owner's collection of Asian objets d'art---but the hand of Cram's client weighs heavily on the architectural result; a case of (one) too many cooks ? Maybe, as you suggest, it is the architect's hand that interfered with the desired effect . . .

S

DavidC
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by DavidC »


Roderick Grant
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by Roderick Grant »

My NYC landlord was a costumer for Broadway shows. (He personally made every dress every star of "Hello Dolly" wore from Carol Channing to Molly Picon, as well as everything Kate Smith wore on- and offstage.) He also did the costumes for an opera performance at the Met in 1966 designed by Marc Chagall. He tried to purloin a scrap of paper, any scrap, with anything Chagall scribbled on it, but was thwarted by the artist's 'peops' who followed him around collecting everything the master touched.

Capitalistically speaking, there seems to be no limit, but there should be.

SDR
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Re: Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

Post by SDR »

My mother passed on something she had heard or read about Picasso: a visitor to his studio spied a scrap with a sketch or a scribble, on the floor or in a wastebasket, and asked if he or she could keep it. Replied the artist (quite reasonably I now think, considering such effrontery): " See my agent."

S

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