Alsop House

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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I think Hill was not involved with Carr. Geiger seems to think Howe was the driving force behind that design.

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Who designed the additions to the Carr House?

....

Now that I've thought about it, was it John Eifler's firm?

Education Professor
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Post by Education Professor »

According to Storrer, the firm of Busche and Markson completed the additions. Apparently, these additions "won Illinois and National Society of American Registered Architects awards in 1981 and 1982".

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Most of Prof Storrer's page on Carr, minus the his text:

Image

Dr. Peter Faukner
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Location: Cambridge, MA

Post by Dr. Peter Faukner »

A couple of years ago the owner of the house has a website with extensive tour. The addition was atrocious with a 1970 style seating pit, basement and family room wing (as seen in pic). The architecture firm that did the addition boasted that, “nobody could tell the difference between the old and new parts of the house.�

The original design was to be sited for a lot in Park Ridge, IL. The house was built in Glenview, and was if memory serves me, the solar orientation was not how Wright originally drew.

99% of that color Carr photo earlier is not Wright.
Last edited by Dr. Peter Faukner on Fri Jan 02, 2009 10:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Too bad the addition is not indicated on the plan. Does it extend westward from the core of the house ?

SDR

Dr. Peter Faukner
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Location: Cambridge, MA

Post by Dr. Peter Faukner »

I think it is very interesting how siting is extremely important when it comes to Wright.

Note in the built building how sun comes up and no sun really hits bedrooms. Then, sun moves to the south and all day the house gets none of that beautiful sun (except for your car in the carport LOL). Sun finally sets in west and it finally comes into the house in BR wing and a little bit in the dining area. This is all wrong and I doubt this was Wright's intention.

If memory serves me, the house for Park Ridge was to be sited so the living room faced due south (someone pls check a Monograph). The house was flipped (you can see this better if SDR can flip the floorplan pic). Now, beautiful morning sun now illuminates all the BRs and workspace/dining area. All day beautiful sun shining in the living room. Sun finally sets in west and the beutiful Alsop style living room glass and all the perforated concrete block softly illuminates a pattern in the gallery walls leading to a beautiful nights rest when walking to your BR.

Also note how family room and open yard all built off the BR wing on the west side of the built house. I suspect original Park Ridge site open yard (and perhaps garden, as Wright drew in gardens in most of his Usonian designs) were to be south off the living room. That may have been where the yard/open space/vista was to be.

How did I do?

Of course, this is all unconfirmed theory.

You really need to live in a Wright house to grasp all this.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I think you did well. One can confirm Wright's intention by inspecting his plans, which I think bear out the recipe you so lovingly depict, again and again. . .



SDR

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

I'm curious, near the end of Sargeant's book on Usonian Homes there is a reprint of several pages of an old House and Home magazine article on the Alsop House. If someone has the book, or better yet, the original article in the H & H magazine, would they be so kind as to post it here or message it to me directly? thank you!

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »

I don't have the magazine but the information re the article (via Steinerag - scroll down a bit over halfway) is as follows:

Date: February 1959
Title: House & Home - February 1959 (Published Monthly by Time Inc., New York)

Author: De Reus, Jim; Edited by Morgan-Ryan, Kathryn

Description: “Builder Jim De Reus tells you: What we learned from Frank Lloyd Wright.� Carroll Alsop House, Oskaloosa, Iowa. Includes Includes nine photographs and nine illustrations. (Sweeney 1287)

Size: 9.25 x 12.5

Pages: Pp 126-133

S#: 1287.00.1206


David

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Three different issues of House & Home, with a total of 23 pages, are reproduced at quarter-page size in Sergeant's book. I won't post them here unless there's enough demand, as the pages are barely legible in the book, and would probably be unreadable after further scanning and reproduction. The list is as follows:

Sept 1956, pp 136-141 -- Zimmerman

March 1958, pp 90-104 -- Lamberson and Alsop

Feb 1959, pp126-133 -- the Jim de Reus piece on Alsop, with good drawings and photos


SDR

outside in
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Location: chicago

Post by outside in »

thanks SDR - I'm really only interested in construction photos and/or drawings/illustrations used to describe the construction of primarily Alsop, but Lamberson as well. I have found the glamor shots through the Chicago Historical Society and Hedrich/Blessing archives.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Well, the H & H drawings will probably show up okay, so I'll select those and post here, tonight . . .


SDR

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

outside in- I think the current owner has construction photos which were taken by Phil Fedderson. I can give you his phone number (I don't think he does email...) I'm on my way back to Chicago. If our car is not picked up by a tornado, I'll get that number to you tomorrow...

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Here are the Alsop drawings from the Feb 1959 House & Home -- as they appear (somewhat smaller than this) in John Sergeant's FLW's Usonian Houses:


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