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DRN
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Post by DRN »

Root, root-root I will.
It should be noted the rather novel term “perf� shows up for the first time on Chat in this thread in October of 2008. Was this term commonly used amongst the intelligentsia prior to that? Did Lawrence learn that term here? Just sayin’...

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I associate it with Palli. I'd have to go back and see if I might have heard it first from her, here . . .

John Sergeant, and the authors of the Weltzheimer book, use the term "fretwork."

SDR

JVS
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Post by JVS »

The term perforated board, abbreviated as perf. board, appears on the Standard Detail Sheet for "Usonian Type" Houses (23-Sep-1940). Photo taken at the 2017 MoMA FLW exhibit "Unpacking the Archives".

Fretwork is a common term for ornamental cutouts (typically geometric) usually done with a fretsaw (though CNC or laser is more common now): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fretwork

Image

I'm new here, how do I fix image link to display?
EDIT: found a workaround... key is link needs to end in .jpg
Last edited by JVS on Fri Mar 23, 2018 4:24 pm, edited 10 times in total.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

John, it appears that your image protocol is correct, so I suspect that the image is not "hosted" online. To be sure, double-check the URL for correctness, including terminal punctuation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_hosting_service

If that is correct, you will need to find a web host. Free ones are available; they typically include advertising (which you see) and some limitation to the size and/or number of images you may store.

I use Yahoo Small Business Web Host, for which I pay $12/mo. There is no advertising, and no limitation on number of images. I have been very satisfied with the service and the operation of the utility.

I presently have approximately 20,000 images hosted, with more being added every day.

While you sort out your issues, I am happy to post images for you. Just email them to me.

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

JVS provides the title block of the 1940 Usonian Standard Detail Sheet, showing the "perforated" abbreviated as perf.

This sheet must have been conserved at the Avery; within this field on the image published in "FLLW the Masterworks" there is a push-pin hole and a diagonal fold. The remains of the fold can be made out on the lower left margin,
starting below the Taliesin catalog number . . . along with several others.


Image

JVS
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Post by JVS »

Thanks SDR for helping with posting image (sorry for the large size!). I found a workaround for now.

Here is another piece of the same Usonian Standard Detail Sheet:

Image

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Right. Good to see how these perfs were to be configured. The filler/placement strip outside of the glass and sandwiched between the inner and
outer panel is specified by means of an X inscribed on each section, indicating solid wood. Seems reasonable; the builder is left to choose his own
means of "collecting" the sandwich.

You're missing a horizontal section through the sash, with a bit more data, just to the right of the piece you've got.

I choose the size of my posted images as I process them through iPhoto and move them to my documents folder. The above was given to me at roughly
4000 by 3000 px; I chose to display it at 1300 wide. My image posts here have increased in size over 10 years; I haven't had any feedback from readers.

SDR

JVS
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Post by JVS »

Here's one more close-up section from the Standard Detail Sheet. Unfortunately, I didn't capture all the text on the right side. However, you can see the reference to the use of a fretsaw (ie, "fretwork"). There are also notes on construction of the window sandwich.

Image

JVS
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Post by JVS »

BTW, I would love to see Palli publish her extensive research on Usonian perforated boards.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Your image is of much higher resolution than the one published in "The Masterworks"; here is the relevant portion from that image.


Among the many things we learn here is the location of the perimeter unit line of the planning grid relative to the wall construction . . .


The horizontal section shows the perfs overlapping the post. How many Usonians have their perfs overlapping the posts, and how many have the perfs inset between posts ?



Image

JVS
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Post by JVS »

Thanks SDR, that fills in the gaps! Now I understand how the unit lines tie back to the planning grid.

Found this listing on Google Books from the Chemical Engineering Catalog Issue 6 (1921) describing "Vulcatex":

https://books.google.com/books/content? ... 405&edge=0

JVS
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Post by JVS »

SREcklund posted a picture of the Weltzheimer perf (later addition). Since the other perf is so far "out of family", I was curious how the features on this one compared to the "typical" set collected earlier. So, first I traced his photo in Inkscape to get vector representation. I then used the MS Lens app to unwarp the perspective from the rendering. Here is the comparison:

Image

This image was then run through the feature extractor. Here are a couple of intermediate images during feature analysis:

Image

In the bottom image, the green dot is the center of the design window. The visual center of the openings is the red dot.

Here's the results:
  • 50% of the design window area (bounding box enclosing the openings) is open, a very typical ratio
  • The geometric scaling between openings is poor with R^2 ~ 0.86, which is at the low end of most other perfs.
  • The visual balance is at relatively poor compared to other perf designs (rcm ~ 0.6 vs usually below 0.25).
So while still within the overall range of measured feature parameters, this design is definitely at the edge of the distribution.

-JVS

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks, John. (Wouldn't you love to know what Vulcatex was made of ? Would it perform as well as even our most basic vinyl caulk of today ?)

Now, for us lunkheads, can you restate what geometric scaling is -- roughly -- and what parameters you used to determine "visual balance" ?

I agree with your placement of the red dot; is that a subjective choice, or did you find a way to quantify that item as well ? Please pardon my failure to properly absorb everything you wrote, and thanks in advance . . .

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

By the bye, I didn't find any perf installations which weren't made as seamless as possible (well, almost seamless) on the exterior. This was definitely
"cladding," or at least partially-operable sash treated as cladding . . . made of plywood, not solid planks. But apprentices and builders had to improvise and
compromise, as ever, on site.

Here's a paragraph of a letter from Gordon Chadwick to Wright, from the Pope job but sticking in a note about Euchtman, which he must also have been supervising:

"The smaller items are about hardware and plywood. Piano hinges are out of the question unless you know some way of getting them very cheaply. Brass
hinges for Euchtman would be $80 more. Hardware people tell me brass-plated hinges are no good at all outside. [Correct.] This means painting. How do you
feel about this ?
Cypress plywood is unheard of in these parts, would have to be specially made, hence expensive. May I use Douglas Fir ?

Later, in a reply from Wright and/or Gene:

"Re: Euchtman -- instead of cypress plywood use cypress boards on the ceiling and wide boards for interior core of walls rather than plywood (if
saving justifies it).
Mr Wright wants brass piano hinges. Where have you gotten your prices ? Have [you] tried the Auto Molding and Manufacturing Company, 2326 South Canal Street, Chicago ?"

SDR

DRN
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Post by DRN »

It was my understanding Pope and Euchtman were built concurrently and that Chadwick combined the lumber orders to achieve some economy of scale.

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