Robie Lamp house - Wright or Griffin?

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4482
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

News from Madison:

In other action, council members voted unanimously to accept a special committee’s report on a block containing a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home and approved an ordinance to create a protected buffer zone at the entrances of health care facilities, including an East Side clinic that provides abortions.

Lamp House: The acceptance of the Robert M. Lamp House Committee’s report was met with praise from preservationists but scorn from the landmark home’s owner.
Last month the special committee adopted guidelines for allowing redevelopment on the Lamp House’s block, bounded by North Butler, East Mifflin and North Webster streets and East Washington Avenue. The guidelines are meant to maintain the landmark home’s views toward Lake Mendota, mitigate the impact of potential new building’s shadows and preserve some of the residences that surround the Wright-designed Lamp House.
But Bruce Bosben, who currently owns the home, told the council that while he supports preserving the house, the area, which sits just two blocks off the Capitol Square, needs to be allowed to grow taller and grow tax base.

“I think those are very serious considerations that are being overlooked in the enthusiasm for the idea of the view from this roof,� he said.

The City Council will consider adding the report’s recommendations to the Downtown Plan at its next meeting.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

RonMcCrea
Posts: 331
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 6:10 pm
Location: Madison, Wisconsin

Post by RonMcCrea »

I've been in both the Edwin Cheney House and the Lamp House, and the French doors opening onto an elevated terrace in both have the same feeling. Both date to 1903 in Storrer. Didn't I read somewhere that the Wrights took the Cheneys to visit the Lamp House?

Wrighter
Posts: 491
Joined: Fri Sep 09, 2005 11:22 am
Location: St. Louis, MO

Post by Wrighter »

Have never seen the Lamp house with the rooftop pergola intact:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... l_roof.jpg

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

That image is published in "FLW and Madison: Eight Decades of Artistic and Social Interaction," 1990, on page 19 in the segment authored by John O. Holzhueter. On page 25 is a winter view from a similar stand point, showing the house as it appeared after the roof garden had been enclosed in 1913.

This is one of those books that every FLW library should have. The cover is the night view of Monona Terrace, the same drawing on Io's book, "Architecture, Man in Possesion of His Earth."

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4482
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

I think the WBG's Carter plan most closely resembles FLW's Willitts plan not the Fireproof plan.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I agree.


Image Wright, Willits, 1902


Image Griffin, Carter, 1909


edit -- changed Willits date from 1901 to 1902
Last edited by SDR on Mon Aug 18, 2014 9:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

The plan of Ward Willits is based upon the Davenport House which preceded it.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Image


So, we can skip Willits, and say that the Griffin house is a direct descendant of Davenport.

The difference that a decade of experience in Prairie proportions and details makes, is clear ?

Or is the comparative luxury of space in the Carter house is a matter of budget ? (The scale of the two plan drawings doesn't match, as a look at the stair treads and doors makes clear.)

SDR

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

It began with the "Ladies Home Journal" publication of "A Small House with 'Lots of Room in It.'"

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

FWIW -- see near bottom of page. Plan of "A Small House . . ." and discussion of origins:

http://www.savewright.org/wright_chat/v ... hp?p=11273


Image

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4482
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Roderick Grant wrote:It began with the "Ladies Home Journal" publication of "A Small House with 'Lots of Room in It.'"
Refresh my recollection... what was the date on this article?
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Paul Harding doesn't include dates in his linked discussion from 2007. The first LHJ article appeared in February 1901; the house, called "A Home in a Prairie Town," has a hipped roof and a nearly symmetrical cruciform plan. "Later in 2001" (BBP, Taschen) Wright published a second prairie house design in LHJ; this one is the Willits plan, and the point according to Wright in that issue was the gabled roof, similar to the ones seen on the immediately preceding Bradley and Hickox designs. The Davenport house has a similar roof treatment; Willits has a hipped roof.

SDR

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

From a previous post that I made:

Conventional wisdom has it that the design of The Small House with Lots of Room in It preceded the design of the Davenport House. My theory is just the opposite that the design of the Davenport House preceded the design of The Small House with Lots of Room in It. I have copies of the drawings for two iterations of the Davenport House. Sketches on the drawings modify scheme 2 to create scheme 3, the built version. Scheme 1 has a covered terrace out front with no bay. The roof does not sweep down from the second floor roof down to the first floor roof. Each of the gable ends of the cruciform plan is symmetrical. The house is completely stucco with horizontal wood batten strips. Each of the 3 schemes shows clear development with major changes from the previous iteration. Conventional wisdom has it that the Davenport House is the built version of The Small House with Lots of Room in It. If that were true why are there 3 schemes for Davenport that show major changes and continual development? The 3 schemes show development from a cruciform plan with rather ordinary exterior articulation to the very dynamic and modern built version. Even the interior wood trim morphs into The Small House with Lots of Room in It detailing. Why go through all the time and effort to develop the 3 schemes only to arrive at a smaller version of The Small House with Lots of Room in It? I personally believe that Davenport House design preceded The Small House with Lots of Room in It. I will post images this evening that further explain my theory.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I gave up on chronology of FLW's work decades ago. There are too many dates applied to too many projects. Storrer settled some of that long ago, but too late for me.

I would say that the LHJ designs were prototypes that predicted work of the Oak Park years. "A Home in a Prairie Town," hip or gable, presaged Hickox, Henderson, Dana, A. P. Johnson, Westcott, D. D. Martin, Cheney, Sutton, Brown, Irving and a number of unbuilt projects. In 1909, the basic tripartite plan of LHJ was extended to 5 elements by the insertion of transitional spaces between dining, living and library, the cross axis moved to within 4' of the living room fireplace rather than through the center. This scheme was also used at Balch and finally Barnsdall. Such designs as Barton, Horner, etc. were variations on that theme.

The second LHJ house is represented by Bradley, Willits and Davenport, using Storrer's chronology.

When FLW got a good idea, he used the basic scheme repeatedly. Lotsa Room morphed more quickly into plans that only marginally resemble the original scheme, such as Heurtley, a compact spin on the pinwheel.

Another set of related designs goes all the way back to Winslow Carriage House of 1894. Rather than plan related, they are based on elevation, and include Rollin Furbeck, Fricke, W. E. Martin, Tomek, Robie, Booth (built) and its apotheosis, Booth, the first project. Each consists of a tower with radiating horizontal wings. The tower scheme was attached to a version of the LHJ #1 for the unbuilt Metzger Project, looking very much like the cross-species it was.

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4482
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Lamp House roof garden

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Lamp House roof garden enclosed as early as 1912

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/Content ... :All,Dxp:3
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Post Reply