FLW's first commission 1887

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Post Reply
Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4544
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

FLW's first commission 1887

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Unitarian Chapel for Sioux City, Iowa
https://digital.lib.buffalo.edu/items/show/30705
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

DRN
Posts: 4182
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Re: FLW's first commission 1887

Post by DRN »

Donald Leslie Johnson argues in his 2017 book about Wright's early years that the Sioux City design was indeed designed by Wright while in the employ of Joseph Lyman Silsbee, but that this was not a commission in classic sense. Wright had only been working in Silsbee's office for a couple of months when he produced this drawing in the manner of Silsbee as a sketch offered to his Uncle Jenkin, a noted leader in the Unitarian Church in the American Midwest, as an idea for a new congregation's church, that Jenkin had discussed. The design is a mash up of contemporary Silsbee elements and is based in part on Silsbee's design for Unity Chapel in Spring Green. Uncle Jenkin, according to Johnson's research, had an idea to have Unity Chapel in Spring Green be a model or prototype for new Unitarian fellowships then forming throughout the upper Midwest.

Johnson further argues that attribution of the Unity Chapel in Spring Green to Wright in any way or form is incorrect as it was designed prior to Wright's leaving UW in Madison...but Wright did paint walls and ceilings during his last summer working for his uncles. The 1887 Hillside Home School house was in design just as Wright arrived at Silsbee's. It is Johnson's position that Wright may have done some drafting relative to the project, but that the design was Silsbee's alone.

https://www.amazon.com/Frank-Lloyd-Wrig ... oks&sr=1-1

The notes in this book are numerous and fascinating...Wright's move to Chicago was very much based on the Lloyd Jones commissions with Silsbee and that Wright was initially supported and later greatly benefitted from Uncle Jenkin's myriad of connections in the Unitarian world in terms of employment, clients, and acquaintances.

Post Reply