Article: Laurent Foundation looking to raise funds to purchase original chair

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DavidC
Posts: 8237
Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Article: Laurent Foundation looking to raise funds to purchase original chair

Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Article: Laurent Foundation looking to raise funds to purchase original chair

Post by SDR »

Mr Wright confessed to difficulties with chair designs. In the entry in Taschen III where this chair is displayed (p 87) the architect is paraphrased by the editors: "He admitted that to design a chair that was both comfortable and beautiful was a constant challenge." To that list might be added "structurally sound." A furnituremaker has only to glance at the drawings and photographs of this piece to predict trouble with the connections between the legs and the seat---as attested to by the addition of brackets of various shapes to examples of the chair. There simply isn't enough surface area at these right-angle joints to afford a lasting connection.

An honest bracket, shaped to reflect the large plywood ones supporting the arms, might have been quarter-circular in shape (comparable to ones added to the barrel chairs at the Taliesin dining table). No one seems to have taken that approach, however . . . and as late as 1960, when the chair was drawn once again for Allen Friedman, these unreinforced joints are still being indicated.


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