Teater Bracket

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Tom
Posts: 3312
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Teater Bracket

Post by Tom »

Have never taken a close look at Teater before so was surprised to find this condition.
Four pics showing Teater Bracket - the version with the perfs is great ... and it's seems humorous how on the east elevation drawing the bracket is drawn exposed:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54449844@ ... ateposted/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54449844@ ... otostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54449844@ ... otostream/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/54449844@ ... ateposted/

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by SDR »

Owner/restorer Henry Whiting could tell you anything you wanted to know about that bracket . . .

S

Tom
Posts: 3312
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Tom »

Does he have a book on the house?

I knew the general outlook of the house but what I didn't realize was that those boards concealed a diagonal brace.
My implicit assumption was one of structural continuity, not discontinuity, along the bearing line under the roof at that side of the house. I was surprised to see that overhanging beam terminate in the pier and anchor down into the foundation.
I think it's clever.
For whatever reason, it seems Wright had to employ something he rarely used: a 'clumsy' diagonal brace. But the way he 'clothes' it (or gives it the benefit of ornament) is architecturally speaking beautiful ... and as if continuous.

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by SDR »

Here is a generous helping of Teater, from the horse's mouth as it were. Henry has a long history with the house; like a few others in our company here he came along when his Wright house needed love, and love is what he gave it. Somewhere in here is some info and history on the unusual bracket:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_AaZn3t6_s

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Roderick Grant »

Henry has published 2 books on the house:
"Teater's Knoll" with Robert G. Waite (1987, Northwood Institute Press)
"At Nature's Edge" (2007, The University of Utah Press)
Neither book is listed on Amazon. I once mentioned to him that I had both books, and he rejoined: "Oh, you're the one." The books are well worth the effort to find, and explain all that has been done to the studio, including the construction of a separate but nearby guest cottage designed in an appropriate fashion. The knee brace was originally constructed without the enclosures, sticking out like an afterthought. Henry had the brace finished. To see how it looked before, check out Storrer's Catalog and Companion. The Catalog was published before Henry bought the house, but the Companion was published in 1993. I guess taking that long trek to the wilds of Idaho to update the brace was too much for Bill.

Duncan
Posts: 104
Joined: Sat Apr 21, 2012 11:05 pm

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Duncan »

In an article by Henry Whiting, Renewal: Restoring a Frank Lloyd Wright (HOME, October 1987, pages 38-45) Whiting states:

"The roof needed structural repair in three places. The Teaters had placed unisghtly metal supports to hold up the entry and a corner of the carport, and the dramatic cantilever above the patio, off the main studio space, had started to sag. Here Wright himself had designed a diagonal kneedbrace, a form without precedent in the rest of the building, to support the roof. Solutions to these structural problems were designed by Tom Casey, of Taliesin Associated Architects, who assisted on this phase of the restoration. Having studied with Wright in the 1950s, he had worked as one of the supervising apprentices at the Teeter studio. Casey replaced the entry support with a new kneebrace and then clad both the new and existing braces, at opposite ends of the west wall, in wood. These stepped bracket details visually extend the sloping lines of the windows, making the facade a very exciting part of the whole design."

HenryWhiting
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:10 pm

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by HenryWhiting »

There were several structural issues with the studio when I bought it in 1982, the kneebrace at the prow being the most egregious. (The pink metal post at the apex of the fireplace being a close second.) As you can see from erasures on the west elevation, supporting a 35 foot cantilever at the prow roof was a problem that Wright and his associates never really solved. Tom Casey's design from 1982 is an elegant solution, as having a second kneebrace at the south end of the facade, where the 15 foot cantilever over the front entrance had been supported by a metal TV antenna (not Wright's design), 'justifies' the first. I particularly like the way he extended the line of the windowsills (the vertical grid). In truth, the kneebrace at the prow holds down the roof as much as it holds it up, as we frequently have 50 to 60 mph winds in the Hagerman Valley.

I do not know how to post photographs here, so perhaps SDR could post one of the kneebrace to illustrate.

Roderick: Bill Storrer has been to Teater's Knoll at least 5 times, 2 with the Teater's, and 3 times in my tenure. As he has written elsewhere, it is one of his favorite Wright buildings. Bill's first love was opera, and when he was here, he and Lynn had many discussions, particularly about Wagner's Ring Cycle. Wagnerians, I learned, are every bit as passionate as Wrightians.

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by SDR »

Henry contributes a very helpful pair of photographs, the first being labeled "1982." Tom's posting of drawings (new to me) nicely completes, with these photos and with Henry's text, an explanation of the transformation of the prow kneebrace.


Image

Image

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Roderick Grant »

Henry: I assume that, as Bill and Lynn are captivated by Wagner's Ring Cycle, they both have the recording "Anna Russell Sings! Again?" which includes an analysis of the story of "The Ring of the Nibelungs."

Tom
Posts: 3312
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Tom »

Seems to me like a privilege to have the owner, Whiting, posting here.
Really appreciate those shots too.

HenryWhiting
Posts: 34
Joined: Thu May 16, 2013 4:10 pm

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by HenryWhiting »

Roderick: Lynn had studied Wagner and The Ring for decades before I met her, and she had attended several cycles with her mother, Harriet Fawcett, who also loved Wagner. I don't recall this recording, however. For her 50th birthday we heard James Levine conduct The Ring at the Met. I was/am no Wagnerian, but I tried to read up on the subject before we went, my favorite and most useful book being, 'Wagner Without Fear'.

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by SDR »

Roderick speaks of Anna Russell, a musician and actor who in the 'fifties toured with and recorded comedic musical material. Her parodies of Gilbert and Sullivan, and of Richard Wagner, were highlights. I was fortunate in having parents who enjoyed such matter; I presently have four of her LPs. I suppose she's of the tradition that contains Peter Schickele and others . . .?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anna_Russell

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10778
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by Roderick Grant »

Then there's the Hoffnung Festival of 1956, with "Concerto Popolare," wherein the orchestra was expecting to play the Tchaikovsky "First Piano Concerto," while the pianist thought it was the Grieg. After battling through, they both ended up playing "Beer Barrel Polka." If you know the Grieg, you can guess how that fitted right in.

I place Anna Russell with Victor Borge as two of the funniest performers of all time.

SDR
Posts: 20604
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Teater Bracket

Post by SDR »

Ah---yes. Imagine Borge and Russell together . . .!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPhFBE4UGvA (Shades of Florence Foster Jenkins ?)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZ_D2cE8_eE

Lest we forget, Peter Ustinov had a minor side gig doing vocal impressions of instruments of the orchestra; I think he may have parodied some Baroque music, a cantata perhaps ?

S

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