Hanna House Table?

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Matt2
Posts: 295
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Hanna House Table?

Post by Matt2 »

Does this look legit? And how did it end up in Sequim, WA?

https://seattle.craigslist.org/see/atq/ ... 84363.html

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

This might be legit. It has six sides as does the Honeycomb House grid.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20441
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

While a hexagonal table with a triangular base sounds "Wright," no such table is seen in photos of the Hanna house, nor is it mentioned in the chapter of the Hannas' book where furnishings are enumerated. In fact I know of no table of this design among Wright's furniture. Nor is any supporting evidence included---as it ought to be---on the Craigslist page.

S

DRN
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by DRN »

The seller seems careful in their language: “belonged to the Hanna family”, “came out of the Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hanna house”, “one of a kind”. The claim that the table is actually a Wright design is not made.

Possibilities:
Mr. Hanna had a workshop(woodshop?) in the uphill addition to the house...did he design and make it?

Might this piece have been made by an anonymous woodworker engaged by the Hanna’s?

Might the piece be the design of TAA as part of post-1959 alterations?

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Roderick Grant »

The price should reflect the lack of provenance, and reduced to perhaps $200? If the owner tried to get away with this on Antiques Road Show, the Keno twins would put an end to it quickly.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

Heh---I would hope so. But what would their assessment be based upon ? Is the table made of redwood ? What would they look for by way of evidence ? The rounded arrises---more than would occur through normal use---raise my suspicion immediately.

Any of Dan's scenarios seems a good possibility---assuming that the table had anything to do with the Hannas. Paul Hanna collected hardwood lumber for use in his workshop, and did make furniture designed by Wright. A photo of the table in situ would be proof positive. There must be many more photos of the house than have been published in the primary sources ?

As obvious a form as it may seem, the combination of equilateral triangle and hexagon, in a furniture piece, seems not to have occurred to Mr Wright. I'd be interested to see an example that would prove me wrong.

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Roderick Grant »

The January, 1963 HB, devoted to Hanna, includes photos (pp 59-61) of tables of this scale, about 15, 16" tall. The tops are hex, but the legs are straight down from the corners. The material looks like metal, but the photos are not clear enough to know for sure. There are small triangular tables, about 12" tall, that go alongside the larger table.

Another instance of combining hex and triangle is the hex table with triangle seats from Heritage Henredon.

SDR
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

How do we know what the scale of this table is ? The mechanics of perspective seem to indicate that the top rises to the middle of the back of the armchair in the background.

I have written to the seller:


Image

Roderick Grant
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Roderick Grant »

You're right, SDR, the scale is not readily apparent. A larger than end table size would seem even less likely to be legit.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

Mr Collins has replied to my query. The table did in fact come from the playroom at the Hanna house; the poster is selling it for the widow of Bob Hanna, the son of Wright's clients. Bob Hanna died last year; his wife wants to move to a smaller home.

There is a hexagonal table shown in the playroom, on the plan of the original construction. The single photo of the playroom in the Hannas' book unfortunately does not include the table.

Image

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Roderick Grant »

A similar photo, but slightly broader in scope, in the HB article shows no evidence of anything other than an array of play things for the children. If it was designed for that room, the scale might have been anything to match the size of the children from toddlers to teens. The remodeling took place in the 50s, so the space was used as a playroom for about 20 years.

SDR
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

Enlarging the photos reveals solid wood for top and base; the top appears to be made from four thick planks. I suspect this is a very heavy table.

S

Roderick Grant
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Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by Roderick Grant »

There is an edging that may be wider than the planks are thick.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: Hanna House Table?

Post by SDR »

I would have hoped to find that. What I see, instead, is monolithic end grain, four or more wide planks, with arrises well eased, and no indication of a separate edging. This is unlike tables drawn for Usonians, which universally have plywood tops, typically with 4/4 solid edge bands of varying heights. (Even in the Prairie period, thick tabletops are shown to have veneered surfaces and edges, the latter sometimes mimicking end grain.)

The Hannas may have had their workshop/guest quarters built as early as 1950; the contract was signed in January of that year. The bedroom remodel was accomplished by 1957. When the playroom became the dining room is unclear; I find only this mention, on page 87: "The dining end of the living room was adequate for dinner parties of eight to ten persons. After some years we were able to convert the playroom to its planned ultimate function as dining room. Then the living room, with the dining function removed, could be at its best." No date is given for that change.

The Hannas did have furniture made for them, at the start. They report making some furniture for themselves while the cabinetmakers still had their tooIs and equipment in the house. I have not seen Taliesin design a table with a solid 6- or 8-quarter hardwood top; this hexagonal table strikes me as Paul's work. But it could not have been properly made without a jointer, to prepare the planks for gluing-up into the massive top. A jointer (but not, oddly, a planer) was part of the equipment in their new postwar workshop. (Planks of narra, teak, dao, Honduras mahogany, ironwood, kamagon, and rosewood were acquired during the Hannas' foreign travels; they were on assignment in Panama and the Philippines in '47 and '48. Other locations included Africa and "the Orient.")

So, when was this table made, and for what use ? Son Bob said it was in the playroom, and I'm sure we can rely on that. But when ?

S

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