FLW and the Architects of Steinway Hall: A Study in Collaboration

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Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4467
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

FLW and the Architects of Steinway Hall: A Study in Collaboration

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
Posts: 20441
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Re: FLW and the Architects of Steinway Hall: A Study in Collaboration

Post by SDR »

Nicholas Hayes's new book on the Shorewood ASBH cottage presents Wright as the victim of a scheme gone awry; here we seem to have the opposite pole addressed---Wright as a less-than-wholly-original designer ? One will have to read, to see if that is in fact the tenor of the work. One-sentence reviews like mine can hardly present the whole picture, of course.

S

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4467
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Re: FLW and the Architects of Steinway Hall: A Study in Collaboration

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

SDR,
Is any artist a wholly-original designer? Isn't all art inspired, in one way or another, by work by other artists?

Only one-man architectural firms have designs by wholly one person, but even those may not be wholly-original designs.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10688
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: FLW and the Architects of Steinway Hall: A Study in Collaboration

Post by Roderick Grant »

Inspiration comes not only from artists working together, but from artists looking around them at the world as it is, both natural and man-made, by dealing with advancements in technology* that can be used to create new aesthetics. But the process of being inspired by all of these influences necessarily varies from one person to another. What sets FLW apart from most artists is the same thing that sets Picasso, Bach, Giotto and Shakespeare apart: FLW wasn't unique, just better than the rest, including Sullivan. Compare the works of Spencer, Perkins and Hunt to Wright's work, and decide for yourself which of the lot is best.

* In a 1950s interview, FLW was asked why he disliked 20th century "serious" music. He replied that music for the acoustical orchestra had run its course, and it was time to move on to the use of electronic instruments to find new ideas.

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