Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

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DavidC
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Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Post by SDR »

One among many aspects of the film: Millard is seen entirely unfurnished for a change, and we see the slab floor with incised unit lines. W A Storrer tells
us that Wright later called this his "first Usonian house." And, we view the exterior of the bedroom stack at the rear of the house, with continuous vertical
openings that might harken forward to the Fallingwater "tower" of spaces.

I'll leave the insidious suggestion of darkness and death in the Los Angeles houses to others . . .

S

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

That wasn't the only time in LA that he presented a multistory interior as as a single space. The mitered corners of Freeman, though only two stories tall, resemble (maybe even more strongly) the corner tower at Fallingwater. The main facades of Storer and the bedroom wing of Hollyhock are other cases in point.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Very good point.

Having again seen the Los Angeles houses together, I can repeat that my favorites are Storer and Freeman, the former most of all. I first read of the architect's
disappointment with Storer in Sweeney's "Wright in Hollywood," and I continue to be, in turn disappointed by that reaction.

My favorite block pattern, however, is Millard.

Favorite images of the two houses:

ImageImage

Image

Image

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The interior of Freeman places that house in the top ten, easily. Storer is wonderful on the exterior, and very good inside, but it cannot compare to the brilliance of Freeman.
Given a chance, but for Mabel, Ennis could have surpassed them all.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

A matter of taste and personal preference, I suppose: Two quite different spacial experiences, sharing an axial symmetry but oriented and exposed quite differently to the view.

http://www.michaelfreemanphoto.com/medi ... orer-house

https://www.curbed.com/2017/6/8/1574211 ... os-angeles

For me Ennis lacks their clarity of plan, but of course it's got drama, even grandeur ?

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The difference between Freeman and Storer is that the former is like being out in the open among the treetops, while the latter is an enclosed redoubt.
The way the columned walls of the living block are arranged as 16" columns and 32" windows, does not invite the view much at all.
Yet both are splendid.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

What is Freeman aligned with�Highland Ave ? I wonder if the tree(s) that partially block that vista are on the Freeman lot. A mix of foliage and view might be hard to maintain�but worth the trouble ?

It was interesting to hear the opinion expressed that a possible scenario might include the demise of a building once past its natural lifetime. We’ve heard something of this sort already, in connection with Freeman ... and the rejoinder that a complete recreation would be preferable to giving up altogether ? Now about funding ...

S

Rudder
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Re:

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:51 pm
The interior of Freeman places that house in the top ten, easily. Storer is wonderful on the exterior, and very good inside, but it cannot compare to the brilliance of Freeman.
Given a chance, but for Mabel, Ennis could have surpassed them all.
I disagree. The Storer is far superior to the Freeman. Freeman has one great room with a great view. The rest of the house was underwhelming. I spent a lot of time in all of them, more than most anyone but Eric alright I guess: the Storer, the Freeman, the Millard and the Ennis. Each of them has certain wonderful aspects, but the Storer is easily the best of them all.
Last edited by Rudder on Wed Sep 22, 2021 4:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Rudder
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Re:

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 3:20 pm
The difference between Freeman and Storer is that the former is like being out in the open among the treetops, while the latter is an enclosed redoubt.
The way the columned walls of the living block are arranged as 16" columns and 32" windows, does not invite the view much at all.
Yet both are splendid.
Huh? The views at night were spectacular.

Rudder
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2021 1:52 pm

Re:

Post by Rudder »

SDR wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:40 am
Very good point.

Having again seen the Los Angeles houses together, I can repeat that my favorites are Storer and Freeman, the former most of all. I first read of the architect's
disappointment with Storer in Sweeney's "Wright in Hollywood," and I continue to be, in turn disappointed by that reaction.

My favorite block pattern, however, is Millard.

Favorite images of the two houses:

ImageImage

Image

Image
Sweeney had a feud with Joel when that was written. No one took or takes him serious. He is clearly wrong.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by Roderick Grant »

Bob Sweeney's major at Cornell was Library Sciences, so yes, he is not as much of an expert on FLW as he would think. He was furious about the review of his book that I wrote for the Taliesin Fellows Journal.

Rudder
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2021 1:52 pm

Re: Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Thu Sep 23, 2021 2:22 am
Bob Sweeney's major at Cornell was Library Sciences, so yes, he is not as much of an expert on FLW as he would think. He was furious about the review of his book that I wrote for the Taliesin Fellows Journal.
No problem! I have always been disturbed by his harsh comment, and especially for someone that doesn’t know the house.

As for my view comment, it’s different than the Freeman. Freeman is wide open but centered in Hollywood Blvd. the Storer is a series of views alarmist which if you read The Pattern Language is actually a more magical presentation. Plus with glass on all four sides. The view is of downtown if one wanted to trim back the trees even more though I personally like the greenery and privacy it affords. Nonetheless, there is plenty of distant views.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Re: Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by Roderick Grant »

One fact that must be taken into account for both Storer and Freeman is that the city they were built in no longer exists. From the living room of Freeman, one could see a few old houses and lots of orange groves, right up to the SW corner of Hollywood and Highland. The commercial development of Hollywood Blvd. ended at Highland Avenue with the two-story Hollywood Hotel (1902) on the NW corner. Even the Methodist Church (1927), which blocks much of the view, wasn't built until after Freeman. The view from Storer was similarly rural, with little more than bean fields stretching down to Wilshire. This meant that at night, there was nothing to look at from either house. Storer has a better prospect due to the large estate across the street, which predated Storer, and is still in the hands of the original family.

As to the quality of design, unless you are extremely old, Rudder, you never saw the lower level as FLW designed it. RMS redesigned the entire level when Sam and Harriet divorced, and both refused to give up the house. It was an egregious remodel; the same effect of dividing the space could have been accomplished with a non-structural wall at the east end of the lounge, which would have made restoring the level possible. The apartment added to that level was not a happy alteration, either.

As designed (I have a complete set of blueprints) Freeman was a true masterpiece, not derived from anything FLW had done before. Whether one is better than the other is just a matter of personal preference.

Rudder
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2021 1:52 pm

Re: Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by Rudder »

Roderick, I agree I never saw the as designed ground floor. I’ll accept that it was amazing then.

The Storer though has windows on all four sides of the main room and was pure magic. Especially at night. During the day the windows were light and columns relatively dark; at night the columns were lit and the windows dark except for the far views of the city. The downstairs was its weak point too.

The Ennis I never cared for though I supported it’s restoration. The art glass and owner changes like Carerra marble never fit in. It was designed for entertaining with just two bedrooms.

The Freeman had elements of magic but the Storer was the best r was loved and most livable design. It is structurally unsound built over that stream and I’m not sure anyone can fix it. Many have tried. I will give it credit for being the first though.

All of this imho but I’ve spent tens to thousands of hours in these houses!

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