Similar Floor Plans

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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Lowes was to be a frame structure. The client eventually turned to Rudolph Schindler for a rather strange but beautiful house, which was demolished many years ago to make way for a freeway. FLW was not satisfied with Storer, and probably would have preferred that Lowes had followed through with their version.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks, UOHG, and welcome at last to the forum !

And, this example shows that we needn't be speaking only of the Usonian era, in this discussion.

S

UpOnGoblinHill
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Post by UpOnGoblinHill »

Thank you Roderick! Thank you SDR!

I had also wondered if it was going to be the same frame and stucco methods used at Hollyhock house. The limited details in the Lowes drawing implies broad stucco sides and repetitive ornament. [The overhanging fascia and in the base of that large raised planter I think?]

SDR
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Post by SDR »

David Gebhard, "Schindler," 1980, pp 42-4:



ImageImage
Image

DRN
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Post by DRN »

The Goetsch-Winckler house in MI (1939) and the Brandes house in WA (1952) share a similar plan. Brandes is a mirror image of G-W but with a drive through carport and a workshop.

In the early part of the century, Wright used a floor plan with relatively minor alterations for the Walser, Horner, Barton, and DeRhodes houses.

In the 1950’s Wright proposed a nearly identical plan for 3 clients: Clifton, Gross, and Jankowski. Sadly, none were built...this was one of the very few repeated plan types that was not built for any of the clients for which it was proposed.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Excellent.

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewtopic.php?t=6992



G-W and Brandes:

Image

Image


Clifton:

Image

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

While Barton, DeRhodes, Horner and Walser were all built variations of the same type (plus an unbuilt version for Sutton), Baker was a recycled unbuilt design first proposed for Guthrie.
This was possibly the first such instance of a design that passed from one client to another virtually unaltered.

In 1907, an unbuilt cottage at Lake Delevan was designed for an unnamed client (Mono 3/44; Tasch 1/294) and resubmitted to Clarence Converse in 1916 (Mono 4/136; Tasch 1/518).
The earlier design was among the first flat-roofed residences, and had hints of a more modern, abstract type than most of FLW's work had shown before.

A 1906 unbuilt scheme for Joseph Seidenbecher (Mono 2/250; Tasch 1/273) was also passed around a few times.
But the most famous built house with an unbuilt predecessor is Coonley, which was originally designed at a more modest scale of b&b for Elizabeth Stone in 1906 (Mono 2/248; Tasch 1/278).
Imagine if Stone had built her version, we would never have got Coonley!

SDR
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Post by SDR »

An interesting point, that last: how many instances are there in Wright's career of the repeat of the successful exploit of an architectural idea, once built; how many are there of an idea dropped, once demonstrated on the ground ?

S

Rudder
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Re:

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Sat Jun 08, 2019 5:38 pm
Lowes was to be a frame structure. The client eventually turned to Rudolph Schindler for a rather strange but beautiful house, which was demolished many years ago to make way for a freeway. FLW was not satisfied with Storer, and probably would have preferred that Lowes had followed through with their version.
Wow, you really don’t like the Storer. Eric Wright would disagree with you about his grandfathers sentiments. There was an issue with the severity of the siting which was solved by planting eucalyptus trees etc. that’s true of the arid setting of an unirrigated LA back then.

Roderick Grant
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by Roderick Grant »

On the contrary; Storer is one of my favorite houses. I was not making a claim about FLW's reaction to the house. It is in Sweeney's book that he was dissatisfied.

Rudder
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Thu Sep 23, 2021 2:11 am
On the contrary; Storer is one of my favorite houses. I was not making a claim about FLW's reaction to the house. It is in Sweeney's book that he was dissatisfied.
Sweeney had a personal grudge going on as he was denied access for some tours he was doing, or something like that, as I was told.

Roderick Grant
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by Roderick Grant »

Joel was very accommodating for some time after restoration of Storer. Shortly after he hosted a dinner for a Rennie MacIntosh group from Scotland, someone got into his back yard and stole a set of table and chairs reproduced from the Midway Gardens. After that, he was circumspect, to put it mildly.

Rudder
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by Rudder »

Roderick Grant wrote:
Thu Sep 23, 2021 11:09 am
Joel was very accommodating for some time after restoration of Storer. Shortly after he hosted a dinner for a Rennie MacIntosh group from Scotland, someone got into his back yard and stole a set of table and chairs reproduced from the Midway Gardens. After that, he was circumspect, to put it mildly.
He must have gotten another set then as it was there when he sold it.
He basically allowed Eric Wright to show it whenever he wanted but no one else.

Roderick Grant
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by Roderick Grant »

Just so. As soon as it happened, he bought a replacement. Being rich is so convenient.

If I owned a FLW treasure, I would be very reluctant to open it up for tours. I don't blame Joel one bit for putting an end to it. In 1976, a "Frank Lloyd Wright Week" was declared, and at least Sturges, Freeman, Ennis and La Miniatura were open. (Hollyhock, of course, as a public building, but I don't know about Oboler, Storer or Pearce.) Jack Larsen and James Bridges, owners of Sturges, expected a few people to show up on Saturday and Sunday, but were horrified to see lines of lookie-loos down the driveway and around the street below both days. After that, they refused access. Same with La Min; no one got into it for years after that rampage.

SDR
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Re: Similar Floor Plans

Post by SDR »

Some of Joel's enviable collection of furnishings and objets d'art were on display in photos taken of Storer after his restoration. I wouldn't have wanted the public anywhere near that treasure, were it mine. Photos of Auldbrass are hilarious, for their inclusion of an endless cornucopia of marvelous stuff . . .

S

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