Videos: Burlingham "Pottery House" - Santa Fe, NM

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DavidC
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Videos: Burlingham "Pottery House" - Santa Fe, NM

Post by DavidC »

Santa Fe, NM Frank Lloyd Wright house-2nd Fly around DJI drone - [3:17]


And, a video from 5 years ago that shows the interior:

Home of the Week: Frank Lloyd Wright Pottery House - [2:21]


David

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

At about 0:36 on the left side of the screen, is a neighboring house also of a marquis design, that looks interesting.

The principal problem with the Pottery House is the scale, which was significantly enlarged from the original. The landscaping could be corrected easily enough.

The drone gets very close at one point, down at peeping Tom window level. I guess the video must have been done by the owners?

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


SREcklund
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Post by SREcklund »

DavidC wrote:Poe restores pottery house


David
It's only a Wright in the eyes of a greedy real estate agent, so I hope Mr Poe enjoys his wannabe and "significant upgrades" ...
Docent, Hollyhock House - Hollywood, CA
Humble student of the Master

"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

It's unfortunate that the original design, which was realized in Phoenix, has been demolished. The built version is not an unappealing place, but its change in scale did not improve it.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

So, the Klotsche Pottery House was too big, and the other one built in Phoenix (now demolished) for the Bendheims was too small, was Burlingham just right?
Storrer has a pic of each here:
http://www.franklloydwrightinfo.com/wrightxtaa.html

Bendheim’s courtyard (the pink one) is a bit tight....

DRN
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Post by DRN »

I Googled “Bendheim, Wright, Phoenix� and found this archival newspaper article:
https://www.newspapers.com/newspage/120240838/
It is a April 27, 1986 Arizona Republic article about the controversy that emerged when the Bendheims learned another Legacy house was being built from the same source design. The article was not completely scanned at Newspapers.com, and has some missing sentences, but you can gather the scene.... I pasted it here:

The Pottery House in northeast Phoenix is based on an unbuilt design by Frank Lloyd Wright. Plan's profitable twin upsets Valley couple
By ANN PATTERSON Arizona Republic Staff
Ronnie Bendheim makes kiln-fired earthen vases and bowls to sell to collectors. What could he more natural, then, than that her husband, Otto, a Phoenix psychiatrist, should give her the Pottery House as a special gift? "It was designed (originally)by Frank Lloyd Wright for two potters, a husband and a wife," Ronnie Bendheim said. "The whole house is like one big vessel." The Bendheims' delight in their new bowl-shaped house on a northeast Phoenix hillside has been marred,however, by an unforeseen event. The couple has learned that their Pottery House, completed in "January, has a twin in Santa Fe, N.M. "My husband was under the impression that he had bought a 'one and only,' " Bendheim said. "I was really upset when our daughter showed me an article in a Tucson paper about another Pottery House in Santa Fe. It was a big disappointment to us." In bittersweet tones, she added, "But they (the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation at Taliesin West, which contracted for both homes) don't seem to feel bad about it, because they have another house." How the Pottery House almost came to be built in the 1940s, and later how it was put up in two places within a year, is a study in microcosm of what's been happening to Frank Lloyd Wright's material legacy since he died in 1959. Ronnie Bendheim said the couple first approached Taliesin to ask about a Wright design in 1982. They were introduced to then Taliesin Associate Charles Robert Schiffner, who is best known for the House of the Future, a computerized home at Ahwatukee. Almost immediately Schiffner suggested the Pottery House for the Bendheims. In part this was because he sat next to Taliesin associate Charles Montooth, who tried in 1980 to flesh out Wright's renderings of the. Pottery House for another client who later reneged. "I also knew about it because this was one of Mr. Wright's more published designs," he said. In fact, Wright sketched several versions of the Pottery House between 1941 and 1943 for Lloyd Burlingham of El Paso, Texas, who wanted it for a sandy site northwest of the city. Wright's rough drawings, Schiffner said, are small about 3 inches in diameter and inexact, portraying a house of rammed earth and, in different stages of development, one or two stories high. Letters in the Taliesin archives indicate that in 1942 Burlingham asked for "substantial additions and alterations" to enlarge the bedrooms and add a chapel. Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer, Taliesin archivist, said negotiations were broken off later that year and dropped altogether after Burlingham died. The concept, however, continued to intrigue Wright enthusiasts who often divide the master's work into periods for example, his early prairie-school period. They seem unable to classify the Pottery House. "this house is so unique in Mr. Wright's work. There's nothing you can say this grew out of or evolved from nothing," Schiffner said. Schiffner worked with other Taliesin associates to translate Wright's concept into a concave Gary Ulik' Republic Otto Bendheim gave the Pottery House to his wife, Ronnie, a potter, as a gift, pot-shaped fireplace inside the living room. Wright's drawings, Schiffner Among innovations that architect Charles Robert Schiffner added were a said, called for a fireplace half in and half outside the structure. home before he did, he said, but was not deterred. "Ours is the only house by Frank Lloyd Wright that's adobe," he explained. Today, Sotheby's International Realty lists the Pottery House in Santa Fe for sale for $2.2 million. It is offered by a bank trust. What was the role of Taliesin in all this? After all, the foundation controls Wright's unbuilt designs, his letters, lectures, photographs and related memorabilia. Archivist Pfeiffer said Taliesin requires that clients wanting an original Wright design hire a Taliesin architect and pay a fee of 15 percent of the project. William Wesley Peters, foundation chairman, - Wright, SS 2,000-square-foot, 3-bedroom, 3-bath house in northeast Phoenix. He retained the original oval shape but formed it of plaster over wood forms, raking the surface to resemble the uneven texture of a pot made with clay coils. "I made an analysis for building it with adobe but ran into problems with codes," Schiffner said. "There was also the cost factor." Arizona building departments typically make it difficult to build with adobe. Schiffner finally chose a one-story floor plan, coloring the house the red of Camelback Mountain and centering a swimming pool in the interior patio to provide a setting for a stone sculpture by the Bendheims' son, Fred. "The original house had three eucalyptus trees and a fountain, but not a pool," Schiffner said."This house is an interpretation of Mr. Wright's conceptual design which had to be molded by the site, the codes, the client's needs and the budget." But by the time the house was completed in January (construction was delayed by contractor troubles), it was already the second Pottery House. Santa Fe developer Charles Klotsche finished a 5,000-square-foot version in April 1985. He built it as a "spec house," that is, one constructed for resale. "I read about it in a book," he said. "We find they (Wright designs) are pretty salable." Klotsche lived there three weeks just time for the tony magazine, Architectural Digest, to photograph it. Then the owner of Klotsche Properties sold it for an undisclosed sum. Klotsche knew the Bendheims had started their Architect

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks. Needs some editing; maybe those are picture captions mixed into the text ? Anyway, an interesting and informative account, taken at face value.

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Burlingham, as presented in Monograph 7 and in Taschen II.


Image Monograph


Image Taschen


Image "Preliminary studies" (no number)


Image 4202.02

Image (inverted)



Image 4202.007


Image 4202.001


Image (detail)

images © 1986 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., © 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH Ltd., and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

DRN
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Post by DRN »

Thanks for the images SDR...this is a link to a pre-outage thread with links to other Pottery/Klotsche/Bendheim discussions:

http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... 1f4bbfff6a

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The giant banana slug creeping across the roof, at left in the above rendering, is a mystery. A skylight ? If so, the perspective view of a structure of arching parallel ribs is truly atrocious. Just as some material choices in Wright's work were, at the time, beyond what current technology could properly support, so too did his late-period geometries occasionally tax the drafting staff . . .it seems.

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The stairs in the corner of the dining room rise to the banana slug, which appears to be some sort of shade?

One original detail that I am sure did not get built right is the rows of tiny "portholes" along the bedroom wing. They were intended to be open for ventilation, but are capped with glass, making them seem spurious.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


SDR
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Post by SDR »

Image Image ?

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


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