Fallingwater photo

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JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

on another note, regarding those trellis gutter and balcony flashing details, looking at Monograph 5, there are details answering our previous questions:

Regarding those trough-like gutters built integrally into the trellis/skylight assembly, this detail is provided including specific materials (hard to read without a microscope).
I think the notes say:

A:
"corner chipped off and filled with Carey's mastic"
"Carey's mastic under lead"

B:
" ???? caulked with lead and sulphur"
"lead counterflashing over Carey's mastic"

C:
"1 x 1 3/4" pine wood strip fastened to slab with expansion bolts 4'-0" o.c."
" 1" thermal "

Image


Then, the "baseboard"- like flashing within the balcony:

Image

The note reads:
"caulked with lead and sulphur"
"lead counterflashing over Carey's special flashing compound"

Then underneath the stone pavers, it looks like Wright's hand note says something about "Carey's 4 ply asphalt roofing ..." suggesting a version of a 'built up' roof system.

Image


I hope that Mr. Carey got some credit for his special compounds and caulks. FLW was relying heavily on his sealant mojo.

DRN
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Post by DRN »

Notice the ceiling where an array of bare light bulbs await the installation of the translucent light tray.
The incandescent bulbs and sockets were removed when the wood and fabric screen was added around the time the final furnishings arrived. Fluorescent light fixtures were connected to the wiring that originally energized the sockets, with the intent to more evenly light the fabric "diffuser". Fluorescent lighting was also added to closet tops and high decks throughout the house. It was noted by docents during my 1979 and 1983 tours that the fluorescent lighting installation at Fallingwater was likely one of the first residential uses of the type....not sure if that has been verified. The Kaufmann's presumably would have been familiar with fluorescent tubes from their store's earlier Art Deco renovations by Benno Janssen.

It is not clear to me if the flat seam lead roofing on the roof detail shown was to be used on the larger expanses above the third floor. The flat seam has the ability to take paint which would enable a monolithic appearance on trellis tops or flat plane roofs visible from the second or third floors.
Last edited by DRN on Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

I don't generally like flourescent light -- too cold and shadowless. There's nothing cold (visually) about the FW living room, so they must've managed the light temperature effectively,

Regarding the detail drawings above, and applying to the typical detailing throughout the exterior, I wonder specifically how their formwork was fabricated to achieve the half-round radiused edge at most all of the concrete. Specifically what material was used to fabricate that negative shape -- large concave wooden pieces? or a metal half pipe? or something plastic?

DRN
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Post by DRN »

There's nothing cold (visually) about the FW living room, so they must've managed the light temperature effectively,
The warmth of the fabric and the paint color on the concrete helps, but I've wondered if warm color tubes normally used in refrigerated meat cases were installed.

Relative to the parapet tops, could the forms have been partially stripped and the soft concrete screeded? The concrete has a troweled finish...could the tops be built up? Though, I find it hard to imagine a rounded top was applied to an earlier pour given the risk of cracking, and the fact that of all the cracks found throughout the house, none seem to be at the parapet tops.

JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

In these photos the light temperature is as warm as you'd want it to be, but of course in recent photos curators would surely have been able to avail themselves of current day warm lamps.

http://www.wright-house.com/frank-lloyd ... ater-L.jpg

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... rior_5.JPG

I wonder when the first color photo shoot would've been done there by a professional. Do we know that? Color photos dating to the 30's & 40's would've likely shown the original fixtures.
In old analog photography fluorescent light goes green when shot on tungsten film, which is used to work with incandescent fixtures.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Hoffmann, p 78, has Edgar, jr, "busy making changes to the lighting. He thought that fluorescent tubes, which were already in commercial use, might be used with baffles to create better indirect lighting, and so most of the lighting
became fluorescent." Hoffmann doesn't always keep the reader informed as to dates, but we seem to be in 1938, here. A few pages earlier, we learn, about the living-room ceiling, that "Wright planned to conceal the lights behind
panels of Japanese rice paper (which he was to buy in Chicago) . . ." but that, in the end, "the panels were filled in with beige muslin rather than rice paper." Hoffmann provides two photos, on page 7:


Image


The color temperature of concealed lighting can be modified by painting hidden reflective surfaces . . .

An enormous trove of Fallingwater photos, taken in July 2011, can be found here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/5991039591/

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Also in Hoffmann's book, on page 75: ". . . some of [Wright's] drawings for the more elaborate furnishing of the living room show that he was working within a pattern of floor modules two feet square and three feet square . . ."

And, again on page 78, in re Hope's sash and screens: "Between the spring and fall of 1938, for only 18,000 dollars, the architect Walter Gropius built a house for himself in Lincoln, Massachusetts, without a single specially
designed part. [Could that be true ?] Edgar Kaufmann, jr, was surprised to find better hardware from Hope's than had been supplied to Bear Run. He complained to Hope's, and between October 25 and December ten sheets of
drawings were made for revisions to the hardware of the double folding-out doors to the terraces, the single side-hung doors, the casement screen doors and so on. Nine more sheets were finished by January 14, 1939. Most of
the screens were yet to be made. When they arrived, Edgar Kaufmann, jr, suggested that they be left in the factory finish, a blue-gray, for contrast with the Cherokee red of the steel sash."

Photos in the above-cited flickr album appear to show the screens in that condition . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

...[Could that be true?] Yes. 18 grand in 1938 would be the same as $322K in today's dollars. Actually, I suspect that much money during the Depression would have bought even more than $322K-worth. I have seen the Gropius House. It's of very modest size, no special materials, nor complicated construction. Nice house. Not very special.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Perhaps it's merely a perception, but it seems to me that photos of the living room of FW are often taken from a lower point of view than those of other FLW houses. Does that make sense, or is my eyesight playing tricks on me?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I wouldn't be surprise if research bore out your impression, though I can't offer much by way of explanation -- except that the ceiling "landscape" including the lighting feature can best be appreciated from a lower vantage
point, while the floor looks especially delicious when daylight bounces off its waxed irregular surfaces, as seen best from ditto.

By the way, photos in the Wally Gobetz flickr gallery include at least a couple that show that the floor grouting, with its raised bead bridging the varying gaps between slates, was faithfully recreated in the living room following
major surgery.

My question about the Gropius house had to do with the immediately preceding phrase, "without a single specially designed part." I thought I recalled an unusual handrail detail -- but perhaps it was made from stock sections ?

https://burakagbulut.files.wordpress.co ... 0429pr.jpg

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I stumbled upon this little video today . . .

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDbSWxtTXoo

S

TrevorWest
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Re: Fallingwater photo

Post by TrevorWest »

I would have never noticed such small details.

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