The roof over Kentuck Knob

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SDR
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by SDR »

The great majority of Usonians whose drawings I have looked at show no steel in vertical support members. One exception is the Lowell Walter house.

Curtis Besinger has something to say about the hybrid wood/steel sash and doors that are seen in drawings for at least a couple of houses, one of which he had much involvement in, the house for Albert Adelman in Fox Point, Wisconsin. He writes:

"In the house for Lowell Walters [sic] Mr Wright had wanted to use steel doors and windows in combination with mullions made of steel T's. In this house for Ollie [Adelman], he also wanted to use steel T mullions, with windows and doors having top and bottom rails of wood but with stiles made of small, aluminum T-sections. This would have reduced the width of the mullions and given greater emphasis to the horizontal sweep of the bands of windows and doors. The leg of the T was to be let into a notch in the rails and held in place with countersunk bolts.

"In the completed set of working drawings, the doors and windows were detailed to be made in this manner, but when the builder tried to get sub-bids for the millwork he encountered a problem, a conflict between two labor unions. Since the stiles were shown as metal, the metalworkers insisted that the windows should be made by metalworkers. Since the rails were to be wood, the woodworkers insisted that the windows should be made by woodworkers. The problem was resolved by making the doors and windows of wood."

from Curtis Besinger, "Working With Mr Wright . . .", Winter 1947-1948, pp 184-5. © Cambridge University Press, 1995

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

I think I'd gotten used to the idea that most Usonian mullions were steel reinforced.

The Besinger excerpt reminds me of the drawings for PeterM's house. I think Wright tried to do something similar there as well.
It would have introduced a new tone into the Usonian "genre"

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by SDR »

I've seen no evidence of unusual sash detail in the Lamberson file. Granted, the house has a number of unorthodox elements; the off-center roof ridge does not result in pitches that are numerically related to each other (where the practice generally resulted in a pitch doubled on the steeper slope).

The most alarming component of the drawing set is the wild variety of plan configurations . . .

https://library.artstor.org/#/search/Wr ... =1;size=48

S

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

Curious
Before we had access to ArtStor PeterM posted drawings of his house in a thread here somewhere.
I remember seeing drawn details of exposed vertical steel stiles w/ wood rails. I talked about it on a post but don’t remember being responded to. I remember thinking it a “high tech” look.
I was so surprised when you posted confirmation of this via Besinger - whom I have never read.

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

See:
Lamberson House Restoration (thread)
page 42
Blueprint #8

SDR
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by SDR »

Huh. And only two years ago . . .

Image

I see three glazing conditions: glass sandwiched between wood, at left---the perforated window panels we call perfs; glass sandwiched between angles, at bottom---if I'm reading it correctly; sash with a single T, set between T-section mullions. I don't see how the glass is set, in the hybrid wood/aluminum sash.

S

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

I have not looked at the ArtStor Lamberson file yet. What’s available on ArtStor is certainly great yet it is limited.

The connection of the Besinger excerpt with the Lamberson blueprint stands out to me. I think it’s a find.

BTW, can you remember the thread where you bring the interior shots toward the fireplaces together of Robie and I think … Rosenbaum ?

… it might be in the thread about the first Usonian come to think …

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

Yep
I found it
First Usonian thread

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by SDR »

When you find a thread that others might want to consult, nothing could be easier than copying the URL of the page---minus the search term, which will be highlighted unnecessarily in red throughout---and posting it in your response ?

S

Tom
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Re: The roof over Kentuck Knob

Post by Tom »

viewtopic.php?p=12900

Learning all kinds of new tricks on my phone!

On page 13 of the thread you posted 3 shots. I think it's a good comparison.

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