Whiteford Haddock House - Ann Arbor

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks for that information; I've never read how these houses were to be built. I've always liked these drawings . . .


Image

Image


Sticking with both the vertical and the horizontal module, in this case, for the stair would result in an uncomfortably small riser/tread number; where the ideal is 17" or 17 1/2" for riser + plus tread (see Architectural Graphic Standards), here the number would be 13 1/2" . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I think everything all around would be uncomfortable. The rooms are tiny for structures that could not have been built on the cheap. Heat gain/loss would have be a serious problem. Leaving 9"x17' awning windows open in a high breeze brings to mind all sorts of problems.

This was obviously a work in progress which didn't get very far, although the 103-unit scheme was intended to be constructed on property bounded by La Brea, Slauson and Overhill (in what is now Baldwin Hills) by developer Harold Espey.

Education Professor
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Post by Education Professor »

The drawings are interesting in concept and would definitely make for lots of 'vertical' living and movement. I agree with Roderick that the design has the 'work in progress' feel.

Macrodex, was your post of the Petersen perspective and floor plan on page one of the thread taken from the FLLW Complete Works book? If so, I wonder if additional drawings of Petersen are featured in the Monographs?

EP

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

Yes, the picture was taken from The Complete Works.

Image

Here is a lesser-known All-Steel project; possibly a precursor to the Rentz/Gordon style.

Image

There's another version of the Peterson style for the Carlsons. I think Wright used the design another time, but I can't remember.

Education Professor
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Post by Education Professor »

Thanks, Macrodex.

EP

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Edith Carlson was the client for "Below Zero," in 1939 -- the first appearance of this "style" (form might be a better word). Then came Roy Petersen
(note spelling), 1941, and William Slater, in 1946. The first built version (1979) is the subject of this thread.

The colored illustration immediately above is shown on page two of the thread, in black and white.

Rentz/Gordon ? All-Steel ?

SDR

[ed - substitute "form"]
Last edited by SDR on Sun Feb 02, 2014 12:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

Education Professor
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Post by Education Professor »

Macrodex, the precursor project is interesting.....and a bit less vertical in concept than Rentz/Gordon.

SDR, it seems that Whitford Haddock was based primarily upon the Petersen version of the design. Is that your understanding? I wonder if the documents for the Legacy Projects were sent to Columbia or remain at T-West, perhaps in the T-West Library?

EP

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

Rentz/Gordon ? All-Steel ?
Considering the balcony on one end [right or left] with the open-space, two-story living-room on the opposite end.

Image

[Same project, refined perspective]

Image
Image

There's also the Ellinwood project.

No plan of that All-Steel project exists, though. So, it's hard to say what came from it.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I have edited errors and omissions to my plan module list on page 2. Foremost among these is that I had listed the rhombus grids at 45º; these are actually 60º rhombi, of course. Wall seems to have been the first of these, with a unique 2' side dimension. All subsequent rhombi (through 1952, the extent of this initial list) have 4' sides. Secondarily, I had omitted two equilateral-triangle plans, following Reisley (apparently the first), namely Palmer and (in 1953) Dobkins.

Further refinement of the list would note two subsets of grid type. The first of these are the orthogonal plans with 45º-cranked plan elements. All of these are based on a 4' square grid, with the exception (through 1953) of Alpaugh, whose module is a 5' square.

The second subset are orthogonal plans with 60º-cranked plan elements. These, with one exception, also have square modules, but they vary much more in dimension. The list:

Manson -- 3.5'
Walter -- 63"
Bulbulian -- 2'-8"
Alsop, Lamberson, Edwards, Carr, Lindholm -- 4'
Neils -- 3.5'
Glore -- 4'-8"

Rubin has a 2' x 4' grid, unique among this group. Like Lamberson, its plan is more thoroughly involved with angled elements than other rectangle-grid houses.

The list will have to be completed through the end of the career. When done, I will post it under its own heading. There will be few surprises. The four-foot square continues as the "default" grid, along with the 4-foot-sided 60º rhombus. The orthogonal portions of the Guggenheim plan are drawn an 8-foot square grid; Marin County Civic Center has a 16-foot module, subdivided. The initial Erdman prefab (Van Tamelan) has a 32-inch grid; others are on a 4' square. The Usonian Automatics all have 2-foot-square grids. Only one plan varies from 2' or 4' square modules: the Walton house has a 2'-8" square grid.

After Dobkins, only three further plans are drawn on an equilateral-triangle plan: Fawcett and A Friedman have a triangle with a 4' elevation, while the Pilgrim Congregational Church is drawn with a triangle with 4-foot sides. Finally, Hagan has a unique grid, a "triangular tartan" whose lines are 4 feet apart in all three directions.

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Macrodex, there are floorplans published in the Spring 1997 issue of JTF in an article about the Ayn Rand Project, which was based on an All-Steel unit redesigned in stone and concrete. There are other plans at Taliesin which have not been published.

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Education Professor wrote:I wonder if the documents for the Legacy Projects were sent to Columbia or remain at T-West, perhaps in the T-West Library?EP
The Legacy Projects were either part of TAA and/or individual Taliesin/apprentice architects. The TAA and apprentice archives remain at T. West.


David

Macrodex
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Post by Macrodex »

I shouldn't say "exists", per se; but, I haven't seen it published.

jay
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Post by jay »

This listing was shared on the FB Wright group yesterday.... 100 photos!

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/3935 ... lpage=true

Rood
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Post by Rood »

Wow. The best of the bunch.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

This is a beautiful house, which is not surprising, given that Charles Montooth was in charge of construction; he was one of the best.

The price is bothersome, high for such a modest-sized house. Seems like it's expected to be a teardown with the 10 acre lot to be redeveloped. Hope that doesn't happen.

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