Wright Chat

 
FAQ FAQ Register Register
Search Search Profile Profile
Memberlist Memberlist Log in to check your private messages Log in to check your private messages
Usergroups Usergroups Log in Log in

>> Return to SaveWright Home Page

Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 63, 64, 65, 66, 67  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3717
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 1:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

https://is.gd/JLWP3Q
_________________
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5589
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Sat Apr 01, 2017 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There's stuff to like here. Unfortunately, the fisheye lens makes it so difficult to determine what's actually going on.

There are better photos here on Facebook:
https://m.facebook.com/pg/lifeatquarryhouse/about/
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3717
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

obviously lived in by a Wright fan...

http://www.oregonlive.com/hg/index.ssf/2017/04/mt_hood_wright_like_glass_home.html
_________________
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3164
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

from the article:
Quote:
Meyer said the interior reminds him of Taliesin West, Wright's winter home in Scottsdale, Arizona.
Huh?

The house is striking and has its own charms as an experience, but relationship to Wright seems limited to some furniture choices...I don't see how anyone could be reminded of Taliesin West by that living room. The house doesn't know if it wants to be Brutalist with its exposed concrete on the exterior and in its bathroom, or "woodsy cabin" with its pine ceilings, or Craftsman with its cabinetry, or production builder with its drywall and trim, or NPS Visitor Center with its form, siting, and curtain wall. It definitely lacks the unified grammar of a Wright building.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3717
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 3:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.realestate.com.au/news/stunning-kew-home-inspired-by-frank-lloyd-wrights-fallingwater/
_________________
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3717
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

FLYING L RANCH, BANDERA, TX

From William A. Storrer, PhD

Here is what I sent to Susan Jenkins of the Flying L Ranch and Zeke MacCormack of the San Antonio Express News.

On a visit early in April I met Susan Jenkens of the Flying L Hill Country Resort in Bandera, Texas. With me was Zeke MacCormack and a photographer from the San Antonio Expess-News. The claim of Wright authorship had been the subject of articles in the San Antonio Express-News in 2016; they challenged the attribution of Wright’s authorship. I had seen photos of the supposed Frank Lloyd Wright buildings and was unconvinced of their source. Yet, when someone is convinced that a building is by Wright and offers documents to prove the point, one must be concerned with what leads someone to their conclusion. I had given a lecture in the School of Architecture at the University of Texas at Austin earlier in the week and Bandera was but a couple hours away drive through beautiful Texas hill country.

Ms. Jenkens was a gracious host and one might wish she had the proof we sought. Jenkens’ evidence included a 1946 Life magazine article on the opening of Flying L Dude Ranch, a photo comparison of Wright’s Playroom Addition ) to his Home and Studio (S.0003, S.002 *S.004 respectively in my Catalog of Wright’s build work) with the Quonset hut Pilot’s Lounge. She also had articles from newspapers dated 1960 wherein was claimed Wright’s involvement.

The first problem with the documentation was that the 1960 articles were most certainly riding the wave of interest in Wright given his death the year earlier. There was nothing in the articles that gave specific support to the claim of Wright as architect. Then the Life article had no mention of an architect though, if it were Wright, one expects that would have been mentioned. And would not Wright have attended such a splendid opening of “one of his works”?

Applying my prime consideration of a work reputed to be by Wright — I get one or two every year — “does it look like Wright” to the Lounge, the answer was no on several grounds, mostly including the lack of Wrightian detail in any major element of construction. Wright may have done a barrel vault back in 1895, but not in 1946. Then the cottages; they have many fine features and are nicely laid out, clearly very modern with excellent use of space. Yes, someone not overly familiar with Wright’s work might think these were by the master. Whatever details could suggest Wright’s involvement were also details any architect interested in modern architecture in the post-war era could have picked up from the many articles about Wright in pre-war magazines.

So, while Ms. Jenkens purpose in believing the Flying L Ranch buildings were by Frank Lloyd Wright was sincere, I have to conclude on my “does it look like Wright” standard that the answer is, no, there are no Wright-designed buildings at the Flying L Hill Country (formerly Dude) Ranch.

For the record, much is posted regarding this project on the Chat site of the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy. Their findings have been confirmed by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. The architects of the Flying L Dude Ranch were the San Antonio firm of (Harvey P.) Smith, (De Haven) Pitts and McPherson with the first two being the designers. This firm’s designs deserve recognition. The Texas State Historical Society should replace the Wright historical marker with one honoring Smith, Pitts & McPherson.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Susan Jenkins' response:

The Iconic History of Flying L Ranch
Founded in 1947, the history of Flying L Ranch has been hidden for decades. In 2015, I discovered enough information to be awarded a Texas Historical Marker for the Pilot’s Lounge and Cottages. The following research indicates that Frank Lloyd Wright (FLW) designed the Flying L Ranch.

Foster Baird Doane
Doane built the Hilltop Hacienda House in 1947, the same year the Flying L was built. According to three Bandera Courier articles dating: 7/24/2008, 3/14/2013, and 11/27/2014 “The immense fireplace dominating the 18 ft. by 65 ft. La Sala Grande with its’ 13 ft. ceilings, is an architectural marvel in itself.” Designed by Doane’s fellow Chicagoan FLW, the fireplace is a massive asymmetrical creation in limestone equipped with built-in vents for better convection of heat outwards on three sides. A meticulously hand carved wooden plaque entered above the hearth reads, “The house was built in the year 1947 by Foster Baird Doane that he might share it with those friends who by their presence do honor to its’ rooftree and hearthstone.”
There is a fireplace designed by Wright offering the quote, “Truth is Life Good Friend, Around These Hearth Stones Speak No Evil Word Of Any Creature.”
Doane also invented Magnaflux; a type equipment used in aircraft testing. There may be further undiscovered correlations between Foster’s invention and the Flying L Airpark.

Stanley Marcus - Son of the Co-Founder of Neiman Marcus
In his book, Minding the Store, Marcus states, “In 1947, we believed that the sportswear markets needed stimulation, so we organized and financed a weekend party at the Flying L Ranch, located in the Hill Country West of San Antonio.” Life Magazine covered the Fashion Rodeo Show. FLW was featured in many Life Magazine issues. In the article “Where Dallas Once Stood” by Charles T. Marshall, Marshall states that Stanley Marcus had lured FLW to attend a Neiman Marcus fashion show where he approved of the simple skirt lines.

In the same book, Marcus mentions that he had previously commissioned FLW to design him a house in Dallas for $25,000. FLW’s design came in $125,000 over budget, leaving Marcus no choice but to reject the rendering for the house.

Elizabeth Gordon – Editor of House Beautiful Magazine
FLW was a close mentor and friend of Gordon. In his book, Minding the Store, Marcus states, “To judge the show and to give added publicity, we impaneled a jury of Jinx & Tex McCrary, tennis champion Jack Kramer, the late “Prince” Mike Romanoff of Beverly Hills, and Elizabeth Gordon, editor of House Beautiful Magazine.” Two of Elizabeth’s magazines in House Beautiful Magazine are attributed to FLW.

Evidence Crediting Frank Lloyd Wright with Designing the Flying L Ranch:
a. The Dude Wrangler – July 1963
i. “Another is the layout of Guest Cottages throughout several acres of towering oaks. The plan of the late Colonel Jack Lapham & Mrs. Lapham and the plan executed by the late architect FLW, was to provide privacy for each of the large double cottages.”
b. A 1979 Survey from the Atlas on the Texas Historical Commission’s website states that the “Style” of the cottages was by Frank Lloyd Wright & Associates. The “Theme” is accredited to AAFLW (American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright).
c. Bandera Bulletin March 3rd 1963 & San Antonio Express News March 30th, 1963 quotes widow Mrs. Lucy Jane Lapham stating, “Outstanding features of the ranch include guest accommodations designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright and airport facilities for landing private planes.”
d. Oral Testimonials
i. Judy Hicks – Owner of Mayan Dude Ranch, Her and Husband Don bought the Flying L in 1963
ii. Judge Evans – Bandera County Judge
iii. Elenora Dugosh – Member of Bandera Historical Commission
iv. Harper Jacoby

Buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Texas:
a. 1945-Stanley Marcus’ House-Dallas
b. 1946-Rogers Lacy Hotel-Dallas
c. 1947-San Antonio Transit Company
d. 1949-Windfohr House (plans never completed)
e. 1950- John Gillin House-Dallas
f. 1950s-Dallas Theater Center
g. 1954-William Thaxton House-Houston
h. 1955-Kalita Humphreys Theater-Dallas
i. 1957-Sterling Kinney House-Amarillo

FLW visited the Dallas/Ft Worth area in 1935, 1946, 1949, 1950, 1956, 1957 and 1958.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home & Studio Playroom were Quonset shaped as is the Historic Flying L Bandera Air Park.

Colonel Lapham had the precast cinder blocks for the Pilot’s Lounge & Cottages made of crushed seashells and dyed with coral to make a rose color to blend with nature.

FLW made innovative use of building materials such as precast concrete blocks. The primary material used in the construction of Florida Southern University in 1941 was an ornamental cement block that Wright developed, using concrete, sand and crushed coquina shells that created truly indigenous and imaginative forms. The Brandes House built in 1957 and designed by FLW was built with rose colored cinder blocks and tinted horizontally raked mortar.

• When Wright built brick buildings, he underscored the horizontality of both building by the use of what bricklayers call “Racked Horizontal Mortar Joints” combined with flush-pointed vertical joints.
• He amplified this by using two different colors of mortar which was filled with a brick matching mortar, while the horizontal spaces are filled with a contrasting color of mortar that stands out and supports the illusion of lateral lines.
• Frank Lloyd Wright & Mason City: Architectural Heart of the Prairie. By Roy R Burens. Similar Mortar features are apparent in the Pilot’s Lounge and Cottages.
• FLW’s Robie House has cantilever roof lines, as seen in the Flying L Cottages, supported by a channel of steel. Wright’s Usonian Houses commonly featured flat roofs and a fireplace as a point of focus also apparent in the Cottages.

One of Wright’s earliest uses of glass in his works was to string panes of glass along whole walls in an attempt to create light screens to join together solid walls.

• Wrightian work utilized Copper Pipe Hydronic Radiant Floor Heating Systems directly embedded in concrete, thus removing the necessity of air ducts.
• Innovative and futuristic, the Floor Heating System is a true signature of Wright’s work. The Flying L Cottages appear to have a similar metallic pipe protruding from the foundation.

Buildings with no solid documentation that they were designed by FLW:
Mitchell House (1894)- The house represents an important period in Wright’s career when he was officially working for Louis Sullivan, and thus, concealed his unapproved commissions by building under the names of friends. (Cecil Corwin)

In the words of William Allin Storrer, Ph.D. - 2015 (famous FLW scholar) - At the celebration dinner for the completion of my manuscript for The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright: A Complete Catalog, Dean of Architectural Historians Henry-Russell Hitchcock pointedly told me that FLW would drive him through the streets of Evanston, River Forest, Oak Park and Hyde Park and would point to a building and often say, “I did that, but nobody will ever know.” This book offers the 700 William Street houses as houses to which Wright pointed as he drove Hitchcock through the neighborhood so near the architect’s home. These homes are by FLW and were produced anonymously as to conceal Wright’s involvement at a time his scandalous affair with Mamah Borthwick Cheney, wife of a client, would have demonized the project. So, enjoy the discovery of 27 new homes by America’s creator of Prairie architecture as his American architecture, the first stage of his developing a Democratic American architecture.

Architects have come forward suggesting the firm Smith, Pitts & McPherson are accredited for the designing of the Flying L Ranch. Harvey P. Smith studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, the same city Wright’s home and studio were located. To conceal his identity, Wright would often mask his works using other Architect’s signatures. In close, sufficient evidence of Wrights involvement with the Flying L Ranch warrants further investigation to validate the evidence stated above.
_________________
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
SREcklund



Joined: 26 Feb 2013
Posts: 611
Location: Redondo Beach, CA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 4:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul Ringstrom wrote:


Susan Jenkins' response:

* snip *

In close, sufficient evidence of Wrights involvement with the Flying L Ranch warrants further investigation to validate the evidence stated above.


I don't know who she is, but I'll give her credit - she's not going down without a fight. I'll say this ... while I might support her statement, the investigation and validation should have come _before_ the plaque and publicity ...

Someone get the popcorn ...
_________________
Docent, Hollyhock House - Hollywood, CA
Humble student of the Master

"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Apr 27, 2017 5:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heh. Well, I wouldn't be sold on the proposition based on that astounding collection of false arguments ! Is there a GSA merit badge for most non sequiturs on a single page ? Or maybe that's a Guinness Book category . . .

If no-one gets to it first, I will compose a Reply to the Response -- something an available bright eighth-grader ought to be able to come up with. How about a homework assignment, parents out there ?

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7492

PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2017 2:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since the Oak Park Playroom is "Quonset shaped," or in a more general term, "Barrel vaulted," I suppose FLW could be credited with designing the Lisbon Cathedral in 1147.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 29, 2017 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay -- here goes.


Susan Jenkins' response:

The Iconic History of Flying L Ranch
Founded in 1947, the history of Flying L Ranch has been hidden for decades. In 2015, I discovered enough information to be awarded a Texas Historical Marker for the Pilot’s Lounge and Cottages. The following research indicates that Frank Lloyd Wright (FLW) designed the Flying L Ranch.

Foster Baird Doane
Doane built the Hilltop Hacienda House in 1947, the same year the Flying L was built. According to three Bandera Courier articles dating: 7/24/2008, 3/14/2013, and 11/27/2014 “The immense fireplace dominating the 18 ft. by 65 ft. La Sala Grande with its’ 13 ft. ceilings, is an architectural marvel in itself.” Designed by Doane’s fellow Chicagoan FLW [citation ?], the fireplace is a massive asymmetrical creation in limestone equipped with built-in vents for better convection of heat outwards on three sides. A meticulously hand carved wooden plaque entered above the hearth reads, “The house was built in the year 1947 by Foster Baird Doane that he might share it with those friends who by their presence do honor to its’ rooftree and hearthstone.”
There is a fireplace designed by Wright offering the quote, “Truth is Life Good Friend, Around These Hearth Stones Speak No Evil Word Of Any Creature.”

That Wright decorated his Oak Park home's fireplace with that message does not mean that he designed every house containing a somewhat similar message

Doane also invented Magnaflux; a type equipment used in aircraft testing. There may be further undiscovered correlations between Foster’s invention and the Flying L Airpark.

What ? How relevant ?

Stanley Marcus - Son of the Co-Founder of Neiman Marcus
In his book, Minding the Store, Marcus states, “In 1947, we believed that the sportswear markets needed stimulation, so we organized and financed a weekend party at the Flying L Ranch, located in the Hill Country West of San Antonio.” Life Magazine covered the Fashion Rodeo Show. FLW was featured in many Life Magazine issues. Being covered in the same publication -- in unrelated issues of the magazine -- does not suggest a connection. In the article “Where Dallas Once Stood” by Charles T. Marshall, Marshall states that Stanley Marcus had lured FLW to attend a Neiman Marcus fashion show where he approved of the simple skirt lines.

In the same book, Marcus mentions that he had previously commissioned FLW to design him a house in Dallas for $25,000. FLW’s design came in $125,000 over budget, leaving Marcus no choice but to reject the rendering for the house.

That Wright designed an unbuilt home in the same state is not proof of any connection.

Elizabeth Gordon – Editor of House Beautiful Magazine
FLW was a close mentor and friend of Gordon. In his book, Minding the Store, Marcus states, “To judge the show and to give added publicity, we impaneled a jury of Jinx & Tex McCrary, tennis champion Jack Kramer, the late “Prince” Mike Romanoff of Beverly Hills, and Elizabeth Gordon, editor of House Beautiful Magazine.” Two of Elizabeth’s magazines in House Beautiful Magazine are attributed to FLW.

Again, Wright's connection with House Beautiful, and with Stanley Marcus, is no proof of a connection to the present subject.

Evidence Crediting Frank Lloyd Wright with Designing the Flying L Ranch:
a. The Dude Wrangler – July 1963
i. “Another is the layout of Guest Cottages throughout several acres of towering oaks. The plan of the late Colonel Jack Lapham & Mrs. Lapham and the plan executed by the late architect FLW, was to provide privacy for each of the large double cottages.”
b. A 1979 Survey from the Atlas on the Texas Historical Commission’s website states that the “Style” of the cottages was by Frank Lloyd Wright & Associates. The “Theme” is accredited to AAFLW (American Architect Frank Lloyd Wright).
c. Bandera Bulletin March 3rd 1963 & San Antonio Express News March 30th, 1963 quotes widow Mrs. Lucy Jane Lapham stating, “Outstanding features of the ranch include guest accommodations designed by the late Frank Lloyd Wright and airport facilities for landing private planes.”
d. Oral Testimonials
i. Judy Hicks – Owner of Mayan Dude Ranch, Her and Husband Don bought the Flying L in 1963
ii. Judge Evans – Bandera County Judge
iii. Elenora Dugosh – Member of Bandera Historical Commission
iv. Harper Jacoby

Credit in print to Frank Lloyd Wright is not proof that the publication's sources were sound; hearsay evidence by misinformed persons, unsubstantiated, is not evidence of a connection.

Buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in Texas:
a. 1945-Stanley Marcus’ House-Dallas
b. 1946-Rogers Lacy Hotel-Dallas
c. 1947-San Antonio Transit Company
d. 1949-Windfohr House (plans never completed)
e. 1950- John Gillin House-Dallas
f. 1950s-Dallas Theater Center
g. 1954-William Thaxton House-Houston
h. 1955-Kalita Humphreys Theater-Dallas
i. 1957-Sterling Kinney House-Amarillo

FLW visited the Dallas/Ft Worth area in 1935, 1946, 1949, 1950, 1956, 1957 and 1958.

Other building activity in Texas by Mr Wright is no proof that he was involved in any way with the subject property; Wright's visits to the state similarly prove nothing.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Home & Studio Playroom were Quonset shaped as is the Historic Flying L Bandera Air Park.

There are millions of barrel-vaulted spaces in the world; coincidence is not proof.

Colonel Lapham had the precast cinder blocks for the Pilot’s Lounge & Cottages made of crushed seashells and dyed with coral to make a rose color to blend with nature.

FLW made innovative use of building materials such as precast concrete blocks. The primary material used in the construction of Florida Southern University in 1941 was an ornamental cement block that Wright developed, using concrete, sand and crushed coquina shells that created truly indigenous and imaginative forms. The Brandes House built in 1957 and designed by FLW was built with rose colored cinder blocks and tinted horizontally raked mortar.

That Mr Wright used a particular material in one place is not evidence that every such instance of use in the country is his work.

• When Wright built brick buildings, he underscored the horizontality of both building by the use of what bricklayers call “Racked Horizontal Mortar Joints” combined with flush-pointed vertical joints.
• He amplified this by using two different colors of mortar which was filled with a brick matching mortar, while the horizontal spaces are filled with a contrasting color of mortar that stands out and supports the illusion of lateral lines.
• Frank Lloyd Wright & Mason City: Architectural Heart of the Prairie. By Roy R Burens. Similar Mortar features are apparent in the Pilot’s Lounge and Cottages.
• FLW’s Robie House has cantilever roof lines, as seen in the Flying L Cottages, supported by a channel of steel. Wright’s Usonian Houses commonly featured flat roofs and a fireplace as a point of focus also apparent in the Cottages.

One of Wright’s earliest uses of glass in his works was to string panes of glass along whole walls in an attempt to create light screens to join together solid walls.

• Wrightian work utilized Copper Pipe Hydronic Radiant Floor Heating Systems directly embedded in concrete, thus removing the necessity of air ducts.
• Innovative and futuristic, the Floor Heating System is a true signature of Wright’s work. The Flying L Cottages appear to have a similar metallic pipe protruding from the foundation.

Again, similarities of building details between two projects is not, and has never been, proof that the same architect was involved in both projects. Mr Wright influenced hundreds of practicing architects during the twentieth century; many of them copied his details.

Buildings with no solid documentation that they were designed by FLW:
Mitchell House (1894)- The house represents an important period in Wright’s career when he was officially working for Louis Sullivan, and thus, concealed his unapproved commissions by building under the names of friends. (Cecil Corwin)

Because one undocumented building is credited to Mr Wright is not proof that any other undocumented building must be his work.

In the words of William Allin Storrer, Ph.D. - 2015 (famous FLW scholar) - At the celebration dinner for the completion of my manuscript for The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright: A Complete Catalog, Dean of Architectural Historians Henry-Russell Hitchcock pointedly told me that FLW would drive him through the streets of Evanston, River Forest, Oak Park and Hyde Park and would point to a building and often say, “I did that, but nobody will ever know.” This book offers the 700 William Street houses as houses to which Wright pointed as he drove Hitchcock through the neighborhood so near the architect’s home. These homes are by FLW and were produced anonymously as to conceal Wright’s involvement at a time his scandalous affair with Mamah Borthwick Cheney, wife of a client, would have demonized the project. So, enjoy the discovery of 27 new homes by America’s creator of Prairie architecture as his American architecture, the first stage of his developing a Democratic American architecture.

Again, evidence in one case is not evidence in any other. Professor Storrer has specifically disavowed this property as Wright's work.

Architects have come forward suggesting the firm Smith, Pitts & McPherson are accredited for the designing of the Flying L Ranch. Harvey P. Smith studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, the same city Wright’s home and studio were located. To conceal his identity, Wright would often mask his works using other Architect’s signatures. In close, sufficient evidence of Wrights involvement with the Flying L Ranch warrants further investigation to validate the evidence stated above.

Mr Wright did not "often" conceal his identity or mask his works; we have precisely one instance on record of his doing so. There is insufficient evidence that the Flying L Ranch is Wright's work; there is ample and convincing evidence that it is the work of Smith, Pitts & McPherson.


Signed, SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3717
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 1:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

State agency backs away from Bandera dude ranch’s Frank Lloyd Wright claim

FLYING L RANCH in Bandera, TX
http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/article/State-agency-backs-away-from-Bandera-dude-11116349.php
_________________
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you. Now that we live in an era of "alternative facts," nonsense is perhaps more easily swallowed -- and propagated ?

It might be helpful if the Foundation or the FLWBC were to weigh in; I can understand their reluctance to be involved -- but the establishment of a "Frank Lloyd Wright museum" on the Flying L premises, based on false information, can't be in anyone's interest but that of the property owners, and perhaps the county historical commission ?

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5589
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 3:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good news! Maybe your letter, SDR, played some small part in swaying the state agency towards reality.

If the purpose of a museum dedicated to Wright's work would be to further perpetuate this bogus myth, then it should be stopped. It seems they have enough material to create a small, rural museum based on the history of the ranch. That might prove to be more of a draw, anyway.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3164
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 3:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Isn't amazing how an unsubstantiated quote in a newspaper over fifty years ago can create such confusion? It is also notable how dependent history is on the accuracy of the press and its editors. One wonders how accurate history is....are some eras tainted by yellow journalism? Will this era be clouded by a shrinking responsible press, a growing blogosphere, and an infotainment industry?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed May 03, 2017 8:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It seems that the further from events we go, in time, the more research, data, and analysis accumulate, until, collectively, something like the truth eventually emerges. Sadly, this timeline does nothing to help those in more immediate in need of the truth !

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3 ... 63, 64, 65, 66, 67  Next
Page 64 of 67

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP