Sure, we can call anything "Frank Lloyd Wright"

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SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Ooh-wee -- looking good, Paul ! Delightful landscaping, too. Those roof overhangs have never looked larger, somehow . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Although the Venice house is a higher-end version, that sort of design by numbers is popping up all over LA, stuffed onto properties meant for 1920s cottages. One might see a bit of Scandinavian design in them, but that would be either Lego or Ikea.

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

SDR wrote:Ooh-wee -- looking good, Paul ! Delightful landscaping, too. Those roof overhangs have never looked larger, somehow . . .SDR
SDR,
If you are referring to the Yelland House, I have to give credit for the landscaping design to John Eifler.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Really . . . well, that is a part of John's practice that I wasn't aware of. The Compleat Architect, we might say ? Just as it should be.

One of my roommates at school was (is) a landscape architect. He came from rural Massachusetts and waxed poetic about "the swamps of home,"
and went on to a career as a professor of the discipline in Toronto. Where is he today ? He's the revered alien presence of a community in Thailand,
still gardening -- and blessedly free of American politics. More power to him . . .

SDR

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4326
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Reidy
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Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

The article doesn't quite explain what a blind archery range is, but it sounds like a place I'd want to stay away from.

DavidC
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »


DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


John
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Moonlight Point

Post by John »

It actually has some "Wrightian" elements. Not bad. A fantastic graphics presentation.

Rood
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Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Perhaps best seen by moonlight and starlight.

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

DavidC wrote:100 Moonlight Point (unbranded) - [5:22] David
1) the digital graphic presentation of this house allows the "camera" view angles that would not be possible in the "real world."

2) the fast motion of the presentation caused many instances of "ghosting" in the images.

No way to judge this house's actual condition. What are they hiding about the current state of this twenty-five-year-old house? The realtor.com listing shows nothing but still images from the digital fly-thru presentation: https://www.realtor.com/realestateandho ... 2897-44602

3) the house has some nice Wrightian elements but has many rooms that are overly large for their purpose. Just one of those, for example, would be the laundry room.

4) price seems cheap based on the cost per sq ft and the acreage.

5) It has been for sale for nine years... because of price or condition?
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'm trying to imagine the process that produced the interior images of the house. The mechanistic camerawork seems more like something found in a video tour of a digital model. I've never seen this in real-world filming . . .

I'm not sure what is meant by 'view angles that would not be possible in the "real world"' -- but the result is nevertheless eerie and unsettling, as well as too quickly paced by far.

The location of this property seems very similar to another -- a neighbor, perhaps -- that was shown to us a year or two ago, by an owner who was looking for advice about his roof, as I recall it. Anyone recall that ?

SDR

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

SDR wrote:I'm trying to imagine the process that produced the interior images of the house. The mechanistic camerawork seems more like something found in a video tour of a digital model. SDR
The "process" is a 3D digital creation of the house because it is a video tour of a digital model, not the actual house.
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

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