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Wright Employees in 1901

 
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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2221
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 12:03 am    Post subject: Wright Employees in 1901 Reply with quote

According to Grant Carpenter Manson, Wright employees in 1901 would have included Marion Mahony and Walter Burley Griffen. Who else would have been there in 1901?



Webster Tomlinson was his business partner at this time. I wonder if Webster did any drawing.
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Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn
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PSTraveler



Joined: 09 Jan 2006
Posts: 48
Location: Lake City, Iowa

PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 8:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

William Drummond entered Wright
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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2221
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Sat May 06, 2006 10:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The University of Illinois connection. Walter Burley Griffen graduated from U of I. William Drummond attended U of I for one year being forced to drop out because of financial reasons. I conject that Walter Burley Griffen or William Drummond worked on the Davenport House. I also conject that Marion Mahoney worked on the "Small House with Lots of Room in It" which was the precedent for the Davenport House.
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Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn
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Mackintosh



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 29
Location: Chicago, IL

PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 3:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

George Willis was head draftsman from 1898-1902. Charles White wrote about this in a letter. He later worked with Myron Hunt and designed buildings in Texas.
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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2221
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Sun May 07, 2006 4:32 pm    Post subject: Excerpt from Art and Craft of the Machine Reply with quote

The is taken from The Art and Craft of the Machine which was originally written in 1901 and revised twice. I think that this is the 1904 version. This lists staff and gives insight into how the work was produced. It is surprisingly similar to the way that architects produce work within an office today.



The few draughtsmen so far associated with this work have been taken into the draughting room, in every case almost wholly unformed, many of them with no particular previous training and patiently nursed for years in the atmosphere of the work itself until saturated by intimate association, at an impressionable age, with its motifs and phases, they have become helpful. To develop the sympathetic grasp of detail that is necessary before this point is reached has proved usually a matter of years, with little advantage on the side of the collegetrained understudy. These young people have found their way to me through natural sympathy with the work and have become loyal assistants. The members, so far, all told here and elsewhere, of our little university of fourteen years standing are: Marion Mahony, a capable assistant for eleven years: William Drummond, seven years; Francis Byrne, five years; Isabel Roberts, five years; George Willis, four years; Walter Griffin, four years; Andrew Willatzon, three years; Charles E. White, Jr., one year; Erwin Barglebaugh and Robert Hardin, each one year; Albert McArthur, entering.



Others have been attracted by what seemed to them to be the novelty of the work, staying only long enough to acquire a smattering of form, then departing to sell a superficial proficiency elsewhere. Still others shortly develop a mastery of the subject, discovering that it is all just as they would have done it, anyway, and, chafing at the unkind fate that forestalled them in its practice, resolve to blaze a trail for themselves without further loss of time. It is urged against the more loyal that theyre sacrificing their individuality to that which has dominated this work; but it is too soon to impeach a single understudy on this basis, for, although they will inevitably repeat for years the methods, forms, and habit of thought, even the mannerisms of the present work, if there is virtue in the principles behind it that virtue will stay with them through the preliminary stages of their own practice until their own individualities truly develop independently. I have noticed that those who have made the most fuss about their "individuality" in early stages, those who took themselves most seriously in that regard, were inevitably those who had least.



Many elements of Mr. Sullivan's personality in his art-what might be called his mannerisms-naturally enough clung to my work in the early years and may be readily traced by the casual observer, but for me one real proof of the virtue inherent in this work will lie in the fact that some of the young men and women who have given themselves up to me so faithfully these past years will some day contribute rounded individualities of their own and forms of their own devising to the new school.



This year, I assign to each a project that has been carefully conceived in my own mind, which he accepts as a specific work. He follows its subsequent development through all its phases in drawing room and field meeting with the client himself on occasion, gaining an all-round development impossible otherwise, and insuring an enthusiasm and a grasp of detail decidedly to the best interest of the client. These privileges in the hands of selfishly ambitious or overconfident assistants would soon wreck such a system; but I can say that among my own boys it has already proved a moderate success, with every prospect of being continued as a settled policy in future.



Nevertheless, I believe that only when one individual forms the concept of the various projects and also determines the character of every detail in the sum total, even to the size and shape of the pieces of glass in the windows, the arrangement and profile of the most insignificant of the architectural members, will that unity be secured which is the soul of the individual work of art. This means that fewer buildings should be entrusted to one architect. His output will of necessity be relatively small-small that is, as compared to the volume of work turned out in any one of fifty "successful offices" in America. I believe there is no middle course worth considering in the fight of the best future of American architecture. With no more propriety can an architect leave the details touching the form of his concept to assistants, no matter how sympathetic and capable they may be, than can a painter entrust the painting in of the details of his picture to a pupil; for an architect who would do individual work must have a technique well developed and peculiar to himself which, if he is fertile, is still growing with his growth. To keep everything "in place" requires constant care and study in matters that the old-school practitioner would scorn to touch.
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Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn
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