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A detail on the Herman Mossberg house.
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2298
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ridge beam over livingroom is about 44ft long.
Cannot make out the full note on the section but it's called out as 2-2x6.
Seems small to be 44ft long.
No flitch?

When did architects and builders start incorporating eave and ridge vents?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16027
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Assuming the ridge is supported at intervals -- perhaps by the rafters in many places -- its overall length is irrelevant, isn't it ?

The paired 2x6 ridge is a recurring feature of pitched-roof Usonians. Among other things it accommodates a thin roof plane, which is in turn a reflection of
Wright's habit of minimizing the size of structural members, perhaps another aspect of an economy that "pays for" a generous roof area, and which is
effectively disguised by his prominent fascia trim.

The occasional appearance of a plaster ceiling plane which is radiused at the ridge -- an unfortunate anomaly, as I see it -- may be explained by a builder's
insistence on a deeper ridge beam. At least, I have imagined that as the reason . . .

SDR
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2298
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Usually ridge supports rafters and elimiates rotation at the connection.

If the rafters of the living room on the garden side are continuous through to the flat roof then they are trussed -
... then it does appear they could possibly support the ridge.

Otherwise the length of the ridge seems like it would bend in the middle

... looking again at the section
I think that's it.
those gardenside rafters support the roof
very cool
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Schaberg:








A ceiling like this one would be impossible to decorate with trim parallel to the rafters -- like Mossberg and many others. Here's a case where
the span, and the length of the rafters (?), might have demanded a heftier ridge beam . . . ?

SDR
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2298
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 9:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

... or perhaps a collar tie.

at Kentuck Knob I think there is something like
a dropped ceiling plane .
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3545
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 11:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

To be clear, a wood member at a ridge behaves as a beam when there are no collar ties or attic/ceiling joists present to restrain the outward thrust of the rafters. No moment connections present at the rafters' connection to the ridge and plate will allow deflection of the structure in plan and section.

The slow progressive failure of the Sweeton living room roof was in part the product of a double 2x6 ridge with excessive span and a lack of rigid connections of the rafters to their bearing points. Steel flitches in the ridge and every 3rd rafter, moment connections, and halving the effective span of the ridge, solved the issues of the primary roof. The double cantilever at the corner of the house was another matter.

See the pics at this page:
http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewtopic.php?t=7523&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=sweeton&start=135&sid=f95f8d770204c3e96f7548122f947d9e
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2298
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 11:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Succinctly stated
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 12:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR wrote:
The rational architect seeks details that work -- for him -- and, once found, applies them repeatedly, while looking for ways to improve them. This is precisely how Nature does it . .

SDR


I wonder if the Livingroom "trussed rafter section" occurs elsewhere?
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