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A detail on the Herman Mossberg house.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16258
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 26, 2018 8:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Part of the magic of a Wright interior is that it's hard to describe . . . ?

SDR
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JimM



Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 1388

PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2018 3:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Local code required 2-story houses...
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2316
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Thu Jun 28, 2018 4:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow, that's seems kind of unusual.
This then is a case where code forces a unique building
... or something like that
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JimM



Joined: 06 Jan 2005
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My bad...noticed on previous thread Roderick clarified it was a zoning limitation as opposed to code compliance; obviously very different issues (while both a bane to building these days!).
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 29, 2018 10:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

And yet, FLW finessed the situation beautifully. The only actual room upstairs is the daughter's bedroom. More floor space is spent on the stair hall, or, as the plan has it, mezzanine.
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 12:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Found out yesterday that the oldest family owned arms manufacturer in the country is named 'Mossberg'.
Anybody know if the house is related?
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 12:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not sure, but I believe Mossberg was in the auto industry, Studebaker specifically.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16258
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Storrer calls the second-floor arrangement a "charade played on the building committee . . ." He employs a Taliesin plan drawing, unmodified. Not the unusual plan module -- easily expanded to 72" if conditions suit ?




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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3585
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 8:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Herman T. Mossberg was in the printing business. See this link and scroll down:
https://wikivisually.com/wiki/Herman_T._Mossberg_Residence

The Mossbergs must have been fond of modern graphics as evidenced by their headstones:

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/39340014/herman-theodore-mossberg
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16258
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Jun 30, 2018 11:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Perhaps the most valuable and useful "treasures of Taliesin" that we have, on a par with the buildings themselves, for me, are the drawings that depict those
buildings in their ideal state. These construction documents are simultaneously records of Wright's design and detail thinking, evidence of how these buildings
were meant to be constructed, and works of drafting art.

The Mossberg house seen in section is like some kind of heavenly abode, a combination of Lego-like constructivism and a refined, perhaps Asian-inflected
residential form-making. The geometries are idealized -- see how eaves and other principal edges and space-enclosing planes fall precisely on unit or half-unit
lines. So simple: horizontal and vertical alignments seem effortless, details consistently applied, everything gracefully proportioned -- on the page and, one trusts,
in space.



"A"


A, detail 1


A, detail 2


A, detail 3





"B"


B, detail 1


B, detail 2


B, detail 3

© 1986 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 2316
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 12:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The section through the stairwell, exterior wall, and front balcony is similar to the section through the kitchen and rear balcony.
It's a surprise if one has never noticed before.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16258
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 1:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

That should be no surprise, Tom; Wright was nothing if not admirably consistent. Like problems, within the grammar and/or vocabulary (take your
pick) of a given project, get like solutions -- naturally. This consistency is the hallmark of a good designer in any medium, and it seems to have come to
Wright early on, and stayed with him for life.

For me, it is the counterweight, or continuo, to the much more noticeable eccentricity and novelty of the man's work . . . and a lesson for young
designers of any aesthetic bent.

SDR
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3585
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The fireplace hood steel detail is virtually the same as the steel shop drawing we have for Sweeton...why reinvent a wheel?
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Matt



Joined: 25 Nov 2009
Posts: 427

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 4:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is so much going on in the drawings that I'm left wondering if the only way to really understand them is to build a house. I know the School has students build shelters out in the desert, but they might consider having each class build an actual house somewhere. Pick an unbuilt design and built it somewhere.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16258
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Jul 01, 2018 5:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The rational architect seeks details that work -- for him -- and, once found, applies them repeatedly, while looking for ways to improve them. This is precisely how Nature does it . . .

I first encountered that fireplace detail among the Mathews drawings. I recall the spec that the diagonal rod is eight feet long. To what, and how, it is anchored at the top, I do not recall.

SDR
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