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Paul Ringstrom
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Florida Southern's new Visitor Center

Post by Paul Ringstrom »


SDR
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Post by SDR »

". . . a Usonian house that Wright first envisioned around the turn of the 20th century." Hmmm ?


SDR

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »

Anyone to what extent of input the Foundation has in this venture?

I was told by Arnold Roy a couple of years ago that the Legacy program had ceased but was not officially dead and could be revived (via a vote of the Board, I assume) at any time. Is this perhaps a singular Legacy project?


David

JimM
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Post by JimM »

If you dig into the second link, there's a mock up of a corner with pierced blocks similar to the other structures. Usonian is a misnomer, I imagine it will look somewhat like the administration building. There's a life size cut-out of Wright posing with what seems like every one at the ground breaking ceremony. Of course, the Spivey House would be the way to go!

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Rood
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Post by Rood »

The Usonian House is undoubtedly the Faculty House featured in Frank Lloyd Wright Monograph: 1937-1941... plates 165-166.

The plan is a slight variation of the more commonly known Hause house project from the 1940 Usonia housing development for Lansing, Michigan ... the same design which, over the years, went through many variations, including but not limited to Loveness I.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

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Plate 165

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Plate 166

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Hause residence, Usonia II


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Plate 167
Last edited by SDR on Tue Jul 05, 2011 10:25 pm, edited 3 times in total.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Dotted line on the perspective, at left, may indicate intended expansion of the plan. The perspective shows the upper roof slightly pitched.
The elevations show modifications to some roof pitches.


The elevations show use of the FSC perforated block.

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

I've added the Hause plan to the above post, for reference. The two-by-four-foot plan module can be compared to the three-foot-square module of the FSC Faculty plan . . .

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Thanks for the Monograph location on this project.

That carport cantilever. All of those roof cantilevers! Gheeze

Deke
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Post by Deke »

Anyone else find the proximity of carport and entry odd? It looks like the front bumper of the car would be really close to the front door, and any visitors would have to squeeze by it. And no coat closet? I'd be interested to see the modifications made to the plan as it's being built.

Deke

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Reference Plate 166 plan drawing above posted by SDR

Took magnifying glass to plan in Monograph: about one module down from the N/E corner of the workspace a steel beam (A) extends east for about 28'-0". From the west end of that same beam at 3-1/2 modules heading east it is met by another beam (B) which extends south for 7 modules in line with the eastern most wall of the house. There is a third beam (C) which extends from the west end of the entry door 5 modules east. That's the system of cantilevers which hold up the carport. I think beams A and B lie in the same horizontal plane. I'll make a guess that beam C lies under A and B.
In the drawing it appears that the length of B is not called out although it is drawn in at 28'-0". A is called out as 28'-0". C appears to be called out at 24"-0."
I also note the eastern carport trellis in this drawing, the outer beams of which are thicker than the inner beams as Roderick Grant noted in the Fallingwater Structural discussion and because of that I am now more aware of this.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Doesn't it appear that the carport roof is too slender to contain overlapping structural steel of a sufficient dimension to be useful ?


These reproduced pages of a 1990 magazine article attempt to describe what was designed, what was built, and what was improved in the roof of the Goetsch-Winckler house. I'm not sure the situation is entirely clarified by the text, the photos, or the drawings. The carport is roughly similar to the one in the Hause and FSC houses.

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Tom
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Post by Tom »

Thanks for the article post. I've seen this before but it's been awhile and I don't think I understood how the framing worked at the time, well at least less so than I do now.

It sure does appear that the carport is too thin for overlapping steel to be of any use.

The framing plan for Goetsch-Winkler on page 44 of your article shows a near identical framing scheme to the FSC House, overlapping beams and all!

In Affordable Dreams the framing plan, if I recall correctly, seems even more impossible with no long steel E/W beam at the N fascia of the carport.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

It's not entirely clear where beams overlap; I can think of ways to have beams intersect in the same plane, though I don't know if these techniques were used by Wright builders.

Here's the relevant plan from Affordable Dreams, and a detail of same.


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Compare this to what was found in the house, as revealed in the magazine article above.

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Image
photo © Dave Anderson

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