Wesley Peters Pearl Palace

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
Roderick Grant
Posts: 10292
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Ancient Persian architecture, seen mostly in mosques, the palaces not having survived quite so well, is magnificent, a beautiful representation of a great culture. Pearl Palace, not so much. I think peterm hit it on the head with his comment about McMansions. That's what this really is, a Persian McMansion. The lesser known Villa Mehrafarin looks much more interesting.

egads
Posts: 892
Joined: Mon Apr 13, 2009 11:42 am
Location: Long Beach CA

Post by egads »

Kitsch is kitsch even if it is Iranian. In fact, for those of us in Southern California, it often is Iranian.

How's that for elitist? As a group we all do have impeccable taste after all. :wink:

DRN
Posts: 3977
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

I guess this is as good a place as any to post this...
Some years ago, I found a faculty and alumni website for Damavand College, an English speaking institution north of Tehran that constructed a portion of a master planned campus by TAA and Wes Peters around the time of the Pearl Palace project. Some members of the community kindly posted pictures they had of the campus on the site so I could see them. Please note: with the exception of one aerial pic, these are not architectural photography focused on the buildings, they are instead snapshots of people with the buildings in the background. Nonetheless, they are about all we may ever see of a significant TAA commission that has been little known other than John Rattenbury's book.

Pics can be seen here: be sure to scroll down and look at both pages...

http://www.persepolis.com/programs/alum ... &PicPgID=0

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10292
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

There must be a transition between a vertical structure and a dome. FLW resolved that in both Marin and Orthodox. The Romans did a great job at the Pantheon. At Damavand, piers just support an inverted bowl. There's no relationship between base and dome. Otherwise, Damavand seems to be a fairly good design, what there is to be seen.

jackaroux
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 4:23 pm

Post by jackaroux »

Roderick Grant wrote:On pages 218-223 in "A Living Architecture, FLW and Taliesin Architects" by John Rattenbury (Pomegranate, 2000) are a few photos of both Pearl Palace and Villa Mehrafarin, a larger, more conventional building on the shores of the Caspian that the princess began to build shortly before the revolution forced her to relocate to Santa Barbara. The huge house was never finished. Only exteriors are shown, with the massive 12/12, blue, hipped, corrugated roof dominating, almost obliterating the walls below. Steve Nemtin went to Iran to oversee construction, so he might be the best source of information. Not so many years ago, several former apprentices, including Paul Bogart and Gratton Gill, went to Iran to see the buildings. I never heard what their impressions were, or even if their trip was successful. I'll ask Geiger about it.
Anybody have any idea where Villa Mehrafarin was located. I've done the GoogleEarth search in the area surrounding Chalus/Chalous with no luck. They do say on the internet that it was taken over by the local police. From the photos in the book mentioned above it looked like it was up in the hills. I did send an e-mail to Taliesin with no information received so far.

Rood
Posts: 1171
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

jackaroux wrote:Anybody have any idea where Villa Mehrafarin was located. I've done the GoogleEarth search in the area surrounding Chalus/Chalous with no luck. They do say on the internet that it was taken over by the local police. From the photos in the book mentioned above it looked like it was up in the hills. I did send an e-mail to Taliesin with no information received so far.
Chalus is located about 50-60 miles straight north of Tehran, on the northern slope of the Elburz Mountains, overlooking the Caspian Sea. I'm not sure of the exact location, but it's high enough upslope to give tremendous views.

The roof design was inspired by traditional thatched-roofed houses found in the area. However, only several guest houses were built before the Revolution stopped all construction.
Last edited by Rood on Wed Aug 31, 2011 7:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

jackaroux
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2011 4:23 pm

Post by jackaroux »

Rood wrote: Chalus is located about 50-60 miles straight north of Tehran, on the northern slope of the Elburz Mountains, overlooking the Caspian Sea. The roof design was inspired by traditional thatched-roofed houses found in the area. However, only several guest houses were built before the Revolution stopped all construction.
I had viewed the aerial image detail on Google Earth from Ramsar (West of Chalus), all the way to Ashraf Pahlavi's summer estate in Nour (East of Chalus), and in addition doing a deep scouring of imagery in Chalus itself. No luck picking up an exact location for such a structure thus far from aerial imagery - unless it was dramatically altered at some point, or removed completely. Really looking to discover the exact location of Villa Mehrafarin (in Chalus?). Anyone who worked on it or had visibility to building notes/instructions might remember where it was located (right in the town, in the hills, at beach, ...).
Closest guess I have on location is at 36°38'49.88"N 51°25'14.92"E with a large surrounding park-like area and many other structures.

plant1965
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Jul 15, 2012 1:38 pm

Post by plant1965 »

ok folks u r getting off message! We all do not have to agree on every architect or building. I dislike some of FLLW'S buildings. but for the most part love his work with a passion. I like the pearl palace but I do see truth in some of the criticism. We do not have to all agree on its beauty or gaudy appearance (to some) so let's move on!

goffmachine
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Apr 08, 2010 5:15 am

More Images

Post by goffmachine »

I found this page with many images.

http://caoi.ir/index.php/en/projects/it ... am%20Ameri

DRN
Posts: 3977
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

More recent pics of the Palace as it deteriorates...probably for the best from a social justice standpoint.

http://www.aroundtheworldin800days.com/ ... arl-palace

http://istanews.ir/print/48650

JimM
Posts: 1551
Joined: Thu Jan 06, 2005 5:44 pm
Location: Austin,Texas

Post by JimM »

That monstrosity (sorry, Wes) had some interesting feature. I wonder if the $3.5 million included architectural fees. Interesting Olga is not mentioned in the credits, but she certainly must have been on top of things.

Rood
Posts: 1171
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Paul Ringstrom wrote:As with most architectural firms projects completed by Taliesin Associated Architects were credited to the senior partner W.Wes Peters. The actual work was done by others.

Does anyone know who actually worked on this other than Montooth?
Wes designed the Pearl Palace, and I have a xerox copy of his original pencil sketch, but the project was large and complex ... Hence almost everyone in the draughting room eventually worked on some portion of the design, however small. I specifically recall John Hill going to Vienna to supervise the construction of the large and elaborate crystal light fixture designed for the ceiling of the dining room, and ... Cornelia Briely designed and supervised the landscaping, which was difficult, because of the heavy salt content in the local water and soil

Another relatively minor instance: Mrs. Wright suggested young apprentices submit drawings for a mural meant to augment a fireplace ... The design selected was an abstraction of flames ... drawn by a second-year student.

DRN
Posts: 3977
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Another cache of recent Pearl Palace photos (20 images) views and details not seen in other links:
http://onenewsbox.com/2017/05/03/shams-palace-in-karaj/

DRN
Posts: 3977
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

From this, it would appear a restoration (or stabilization) of some kind may be in the offing:
https://financialtribune.com/articles/t ... estoration

Newer pics:

https://yomadic.com/shams-palace-iran-tour/

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10292
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I suspect Shams makes a more interesting ruin than it would as a restored palace.

Post Reply