Wright Chat

 
FAQ FAQ Register Register
Search Search Profile Profile
Memberlist Memberlist Log in to check your private messages Log in to check your private messages
Usergroups Usergroups Log in Log in

>> Return to SaveWright Home Page

MY OWN PHOTOS... WALKER RESIDENCE, CARMEL-CALIFORNIA
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9049

PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2009 1:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

wjsaia, well that's Hollywood. Never let reality interfere with a good shot. What I heard about the roof is that, not only was copper scarce and expensive, the manufacturer of the enameled panels was pushing for the job, hoping to find a new outlet for his product other than Maytag. And, yes, Dorothy McGuire was a lovely lady, as much so in person as on screen.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dkottum



Joined: 09 Jan 2005
Posts: 417
Location: Battle Lake, MN

PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2009 3:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is a wonderful little house with one of the most gorgeous views in America. Some years ago I bought some copies of various working drawings for it off Ebay. They were apparently very early, indicating a desert masonry house with copper roof and cypress wood. The plot plan shows a three bedroom, three bath house, with a fireplace in the original master bedroom, but that fireplace is not indicated on subsequent sheets, and is replaced by a small table on the floor plan. There were certainly a lot of changes in detail as this house was designed and built, but the finished house is indeed near perfect.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
rosalyndoe



Joined: 18 Aug 2006
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 2:50 am    Post subject: Summer Place Movie Reply with quote

I watched the DVD.....is there really a lower level of the Walker house.....it showed Molly's room to be on the lower level that has a windnow or terrace that opens out???? How much of the so called house shown is truly the Walker house? thanks
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wjsaia



Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rosalyndoe, only the building exteriors that are included as backdrop to the dramatic action of the film are of the actual Walker house. Several outdoor scenes were shot on location at the Walker house in 1958.

Nothing in the film that shows interior spaces is reality – that was all designed and built in Hollywood on a sound stage, and it doesn't represent the FLlW design. For example, the Walker house is a actually single story building, but in the film the house has an interior stairway leading down to bedrooms situated on a lower floor.

(SDR, might we anticipate your coming forward with posts of clever, amusing cartoons to further tout or excoriate the Hollywood corruption of our beloved Walker house design?)

WJS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17339
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 11:38 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, Bill. . .I think we can count on that.

Those Hollywood directors aren't the only ones who can just. . .move cars around in driveways, any old way they want !

SDR
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9049

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 3:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reminds me of an episode of "The Streets of San Francisco" with Michael Douglas and Karl Malden, in which two villains lived in two mansions in the City by the Bay, one a Moorish palace on Hollywood Blvd near Laurel Canyon, the other the ubiquitous Ennis House. The view from Ennis dining room did not do San Francisco justice. But I doubt many noticed the disconnect; in those days most Angelenos thought Ennis was the Forest Lawn mausoleum, an old army fort or an asylum.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17339
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 6:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 6039
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 11:49 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nice Dadaesque collage, SDR. I would want to stay at that motel!

OK, I will try one more time...

I am trying to see if anyone could even speculate as to how the table at the head of the beds in the guest bedrooms would be designed/constructed. This room is nearly identical to
our smallest bedroom at Lamberson, and the bed would be situated in the same position. I am including my previous post...

4
Drawing by Madelaine Thatcher, Published in the March 1954 Issue of House and Home

Referring back to the House and Home 1954 plan (which I assume from wjsala's description, is the as built plan)... Have any of you seen, and if so, could you describe, the small triangular table/headboard which appears in both of the guest bedrooms. Could it be that this table is flush with the top of the bed?

This is a detail that I have been curious about since I first saw the plan.[/quote]
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
wjsaia



Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 224

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 12:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well, this is really quite terrific, SDR. It has a certain, oh I don’t know . . . Peyton-Place-meets-A-Summer-Place charm to it, perhaps.

I gather your proposal includes the addition of lower level bedrooms à la the “A Summer Place” movie set further enhanced with sub-surface windows that provide view outlooks into the pool. That way they might understandably command much higher hourly rates than would those puny guest rooms with views only to the beach and ocean (with those messy kelp beds) that FLlW included for Mrs. Walker’s friends.

(Now, remember kids, this is not the sort of thing any of us should try to do by ourselves. Maybe one day if you accumulate the experience of contributing over 3,000 posts to this forum as the legendary SDR has done, you too will be able to goof off just the way he can and not get excommunicated by our site moderator, but for now you just have to keep eating all your carrots and broccoli while merely aspiring to SDR’s greatness.)

WJS
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dkottum



Joined: 09 Jan 2005
Posts: 417
Location: Battle Lake, MN

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 2:06 pm    Post subject: peterm question on Walker bedroom tables Reply with quote

Peter, there is a photo of the Walker second guest bedroom on page 81 of "Frank Lloyd Wright Selected Houses" vol 7, showing the bed in a different position than your referenced drawing. There is a tall built-in cabinet at the head of the bed. This may be the desk shown in your drawing. Unfortunately it does not show the opposite side of the room.

If there was a table designed to fill the space at the head of the bed, it is unlikely to be flush with the bed, but to serve as a headboard to keep the pillow from being pushed onto the table. It would also be in the same "grammer" as the other woodwork in the house, and would typically include a bookshelf above it.

An interesting feature on that Walker bedroom photo is that as the windows rise and step outward, the bedroom partitions do not, leaving an opening between the bedrooms.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 17339
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 2:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

[written before reading dkottum's post]

To address Peter's plaintive plea first: I would think these head-board structures could (would ?) be simple boxes of 3/4" plywood, open at the
back and fastened to your brick wall via a Gardner cleat fastened to the brick at the mortar bed (if that is a hard mortar). The height is ad libitum
-- it could be flush with the top of the mattress, as the side-table unit in the master bedroom here might be -- but being at an angle from the wall,
I would suggest that the bed be moved 4-6" from the wall, and the headboard box be raised to perhaps 26" (two units) above the bed
surface*, with the face above the bed angled back to make for comfortable sitting in bed.

How Wright and Co might have detailed this piece is yet to be determined. But my feeling about Usonian-era built-ins is that they are always
minimally and logically designed to suit their function -- and that designing in this way, and building with the appropriate wood specie, will not
produce an object that is at odds with Wright's aesthetic for these houses.

*or somewhat less

Thank you Bill. I will here throw overboard any remaining credibility I might have had, and suggest that the Walker Motor Lodge, a seaside
franchise of the Howard Johnson® entity, would in fact be built from scratch in Disney-esque replication of the original house, but on a larger
footprint and with the portion visible in the illustration arranged on a lift so that an entire three floors of rooms -- and the bar lounge occupying
the original living room -- are made accessible to the pool deck on an on-call basis. (I get this idea from episodes of "Futurama" in which housing
towers of the Fourth Millennium are arranged without elevators; when a resident wishes to access his unit, or leaves the premises, the entire
building rises or descends as required.)

I had wanted to include a neon beer sign in the window near the Coke machine, but couldn't reduce an available image in a convincing way.
Perhaps when I get to the Price Tower Condo/Casino conversion, I'll have that under control (as it were). . .


SDR

PS -- dkottum, would that gap in the bedroom partition be glazed, do you think ?

Your mention of shelves above the headboard is a good one. I suppose in this case they would be triangular, in reflection of the headboard object
below -- unless they extended further along the wall in either direction ?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9049

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 3:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

peterm, I suspect the built-in is the height (or thereabouts) of the window sill. There might be a lip of an inch or so, but basically the headboard should be flush.

SDR, I wish I could do the things you do, but when I try, the pilot light on my computer goes out.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 6039
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 6:31 pm    Post subject: Re: peterm question on Walker bedroom tables Reply with quote

dkottum wrote:


An interesting feature on that Walker bedroom photo is that as the windows rise and step outward, the bedroom partitions do not, leaving an opening between the bedrooms.


So this would mean no acoustical privacy between bedrooms? And one could actually lean around the corner and peek into the next room?

Interesting...
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dkottum



Joined: 09 Jan 2005
Posts: 417
Location: Battle Lake, MN

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Regarding that gap between partition and stepped-out windows in Walker, looking more closely the photo seems to indicate the gap is glazed, with clear glass. The architecture was always more important to Wright than accommodation, and strict bedroom privacy was not always provided if it interfered with art. Many bedrooms had only bifold doors at the entrance. It looks like you could play volleyball over the partition between master bedroom and living room at Russell Kraus.

It is the unconventional nature of these houses that always favors the aesthetic that makes them so special to us.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 6039
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon Jul 27, 2009 9:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Glass makes sense, as ethereal and tenuous as that is when used to make a portion of a bedroom wall. Schindler also was dividing interior spaces in a similar way in the forties...
And using clear glass in order to have the view continue beyond the screen wall seems appropriate in this situation.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    Wright Chat Forum Index -> Click Here for General Discussion Posts All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7  Next
Page 5 of 7

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group
Protected by Anti-Spam ACP