Plaster Over Rocklath Versus 2 Coat Veneer Plaster

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pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
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Plaster Over Rocklath Versus 2 Coat Veneer Plaster

Post by pharding »

Currently we are researching plaster systems to replace plaster assemblies that were removed for structural repairs in the Davenport House. The balance of original plaster walls and ceilings are in poor condition. These plaster surfaces will be repaired and will receive skim coat(s) of plaster. Rocklath, a US Gypsum product, was out of production. Now it is back in production and available in 2' x 8' sheets. Plaster over Rocklath is slightly more expensive than veneer plaster over blueboard. I would appreciate any comments about the pros and cons of these 2 systems.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Wes Barwick
Posts: 69
Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2005 9:47 pm

Post by Wes Barwick »

I know this may sound kind of corny but, maybe you could check on this old house, I believe it is thisoldhouse.com. I know they are kind of commercialized, yet they always seem to have a lot of information available about this sort of thing, just might give you some ideas. Just a thought.

D. Shawn Beckwith

stucco and plaster info

Post by D. Shawn Beckwith »

Mr. Harding:

To answer your questions on plaster and stucco a couple really good Restoration Architectural firms are Chambers, Murphy & Burge CMBARCHITECTS.COM and Schooley Caldwell Assoicates, SCA-AE.com.

What is the goal of your project? A preservation or restoration? Is cost a concern? The Westcott House just reciently tackled these same challanges, extensive stucco and plaster work. We had nine mock ups for exterior stucco color and texture and six interior plaster mock ups for composition and texture. We had to figure out what plaster was compatible with the encaustic wax finish we had to reverse engineer the process.

Another source is www.traditionalbuilding.com. If you donot subscribe you should with the work you are involved in. This is an invaluable resource for techniques that are desired but no longer in the McMansions.



D. Shawn Beckwith

Project Manager The Burton J. Westcott House

The Durable Slate Company

www.durableslate.com

dbeckwith@durableslate.com

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

Our research has led us to decide on plaster over rocklath, instead of veneer plaster on blue board. All of the plaster walls in the house, except for 2 panels which will be touched up, will receive a skim coat of plaster. We believe that plaster on rocklath will yield more consistency in terms of the finished product with the existing walls which will receive plaster skim coating. Intuitively I believe that plaster over rocklath to be the higher quality finish in general.



The existing plaster walls are relativley rough. We will match the relatively fine sand size in the existing plaster and I will probably put horse hair in the plaster mix just like the original. We will go for the same amount of lime as the original plaster had. We will try to create the rough pattern of trowel marks. I am not interested in making it look pretty or perfect. I am more interested in replicating what is there. Two of the original plaster panels will receive very minimal plaster patching so that the existing, original finish can be preserved. It will not be perfect, but it will be original. The disadvantage is that the plaster patches will show because of the sand finish. I accept that flaw in order to retain the original finish system which was covered up early on with wall covering because the thin plaster cracked. The existing distemper paint finish will cleaned and left as is, with the least amount paint finish applied only on the plaster patches. I hope that we can pull this off!
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

Pb Foot

Post by Pb Foot »

pharding wrote:Our research has led us to decide on plaster over rocklath, instead of veneer plaster on blue board. All of the plaster walls in the house, except for 2 panels which will be touched up, will receive a skim coat of plaster. We believe that plaster on rocklath will yield more consistency in terms of the finished product with the existing walls which will receive plaster skim coating. Intuitively I believe that plaster over rocklath to be the higher quality finish in general.



The existing plaster walls are relativley rough. We will match the relatively fine sand size in the existing plaster and I will probably put horse hair in the plaster mix just like the original. We will go for the same amount of lime as the original plaster had. We will try to create the rough pattern of trowel marks. I am not interested in making it look pretty or perfect. I am more interested in replicating what is there. Two of the original plaster panels will receive very minimal plaster patching so that the existing, original finish can be preserved. It will not be perfect, but it will be original. The disadvantage is that the plaster patches will show because of the sand finish. I accept that flaw in order to retain the original finish system which was covered up early on with wall covering because the thin plaster cracked. The existing distemper paint finish will cleaned and left as is, with the least amount paint finish applied only on the plaster patches. I hope that we can pull this off!


Hi,



I drove by the house a few days back. It is looking good.



Will you be joing the Wright Plus tour... maybe in 2007 or 2008?



Good luck.

pharding
Posts: 2253
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2005 5:19 pm
Location: River Forest, Illinois
Contact:

Post by pharding »

Yes it will be on Wright Plus in 07. I really want to get the front terrace on the house prior to Wright Plus. That is contingent on my architectural practice continuing to do well.
Paul Harding FAIA Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, 1941 Lloyd Lewis House, 1952 Glore House | www.harding.com | LinkedIn

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