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The Heritage-Henredon furniture
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dtc



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 739

PostPosted: Sat Mar 28, 2009 5:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've visited the Rubin house numerous times during the past nine or ten years.
Although I did not turn the pieces over, to examine construction or looked for a Logo, I can remember Jeanne informing me that the Hexagonal table and six triangle stools or small tables were Heritage-Henredon pieces.

They were in excellent condition, as I can recall, with ribbon striped Mahogany book matched veneers.
I will try to examine them this up-coming week and report back.

dtc
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dtc



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 739

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 5:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Had time to inspect the table and stools at the Rubin.

They are not pieces produced by Heritage-Henredon. As for who produced them- It most likely was one of the carpenters who constructed the original loose and built-in pieces. (Bob Rubin, son of Jeanne and Nate can always remember the table and stools in use) The color, the grain, the texture of the mahogany, and the patina all appear and feel like other pieces in the house. Now that these Canton homes are 55 years old this furniture and their houses are semi-antiques and on their way to becoming true antiques. It is hard to believe that Wright's last body of work is on its way to the classification of "Antique".
The joints are dead on, with solid wood edging/fascia. The under-structure is 6/4 plywood with solid edging (two 3/4 thickness laminated together, which facilitated the central core joint).
Also we can not forget that Mr. Nate Rubin was a woodworker, he asked and received a woodworking shop designed by Wright, it is possible that he was involved in its making.
Pictures are one thing but I must say the pieces are really wonderful in the flesh. The stools are very comfortable for their short seat height (even for an adult, I'm 6ft 1 inch tall.) and we must remember that numerous small children, grand and great grand children had their meals at this very table during various Rubin family events.
Could not help but to think of Mrs Jeanne Rubin and all the wonderful stories she told me over the years, of her relationship with Wright, Allan Gelbin and her fond memories of having the house built, and of course living in this treasure with her family. As I sat at the table, I was reminded once again, how fleeting our experiences are and how temporal life is...

dtc
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15494
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks so much for that report, dtc. I'll look for some relevant photos that illustrate what you describe.

You said "two 3/4 thickness laminated together, which facilitated the central core joint" -- can you explain further ? It's good to know that these were
custom pieces. Could they have been made by Mr Rubin -- is that the assumption, now ?

Again, thanks for the good words. We can feel that much closer to "the source," now. . .

SDR
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dtc



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 739

PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 6:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was aware that Mr. Rubin was involved with some of the furniture, but also had help from professionals as well. He worked on a maquette for the upholstered plywood chair (which is now known as the Origami) before commissioning it to a cabinet maker.

If Dr. Nathan Rubin made the table he was a multi-talented individual indeed, practicing medicine by day-woodworker by night.

My hat goes off to him, and of course to dear Jeanne as well.

dtc
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William (Minic) Minnich



Joined: 15 Apr 2009
Posts: 3
Location: new hampshire

PostPosted: Mon May 04, 2009 8:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The tables were first made by Minic as prototypes for the furniture line that was to become the "Taliesin Line". The ornamental molding was done by Minic before Heritage-Henredon entered the picture. Elizabeth Gordon introduced Mr. Wright to Mr. Valentine Minnich of Minic in 1952 or early 1953. Mr. Wright showed Mr. Minnich a copper flower holder that he designed in the 1890's and asked if Minic could do it in wood. That is how the relationship between Mr. Wright and Minic came about. Yours, William Valentine Minnich
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MHOLUBAR



Joined: 03 Mar 2006
Posts: 132
Location: Oberlin, Ohio

PostPosted: Tue May 05, 2009 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is so nice to follow some of these threads over time and thank you Mr Minnich for supplying the missing link from our conjecture. I was wondering who supplied the prototypes for the HH designs and now some of the actual pieces and the maker have been identified. Wonderful work!
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mholubar
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christinamary4



Joined: 26 Jun 2010
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Sat Jun 26, 2010 9:33 am    Post subject: re: Reply with quote

thanks for postings Smile

Furniture Manufacturer Melbourne
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hypnoraygun



Joined: 22 Mar 2006
Posts: 560
Location: Missouri

PostPosted: Sat Oct 23, 2010 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw this original catalog on Ebay.

http://cgi.ebay.com/Orig-FRANK-LLOYD-WRIGHT-Henredon-Furniture-CATALOG-NR-/370448712444?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item564076c2fc
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3401
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In case any of us is interested, two pairs of Heritage Henredon triangular stools are for sale at a fixed "buy it now" price of $875 for each pair at the Toomey & Co auction house. The stools were lots that did not sell at a recent sale (sale 114) Lots 297 and 298.

A link to the lots:

https://toomeyco.com/product-category/passed-lots/
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1389
Location: Northern CA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 5:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any idea what the highest bid was?
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3401
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Apr 12, 2018 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

None. I was not following bidding for this auction. The auction catalog typically lists a range of what the auction house and seller expect/hope the lot will sell for; the price reached must have been below that range or minimum reserve. The original range is no longer available online and I don’t recall what it was...a print catalog would have that.

As of the time of this post, one pair of stools has sold.
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Matt



Joined: 25 Nov 2009
Posts: 352

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 11:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was watching this sale and looked up a past auction in which a table and 6 triangle stools went for just over $3000 which I consider a bargain.

I'd never seen the "stools" referred to as stools before and always thought they were smart pull-out tables that could be arranged more conveniently for a larger group. Were people really intended to sit on these stools and eat at the larger table? Seems impractical.

But this remains my fav HH design of Wright's.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15494
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 5:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I had the same impression, Matt. But in David Hanks, "The Decorative Designs of FLW," pp 188-9, we see the term "stools" used; Hanks I think is
reliable. Note the cushion on one of the stools -- and the fact that the photo stylist has not deployed Wright's grain orientation as an architect might
have wished.

The hexagonal tables, however, are not stools; this is probably a good thing, as they might have been less stable. Note the height of the stool: 22",
which is considerably higher than a chair seat. (I assume that the equilateral triangle might have an altitude of 11" and a side of 14" ?)





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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5720
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 5:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Correct dimensions:

https://www.wright20.com/auctions/2013/03/modern-design/243?search=Frank+Lloyd+wright

Height is 14.5”
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15494
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 5:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks; that's better. (Hanks not so reliable after all ? Guess anybody can make a typo.)

SDR
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