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Great pics of Ennis and Millard

 
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Robert



Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 42
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:27 am    Post subject: Great pics of Ennis and Millard Reply with quote

OK, I'm new here, so some of you may have seen these, but in my recent forum search I didn't see any mention of these great pics of both Millard and Ennis houses (interiors and exteriors), as well as many pics of several other well-known dwellings.
Interior pics of both houses include areas rarely photographed, like the entrance area to Ennis and no less than three pics of the main Ennis bedroom from different angles.
There is also the following picture. If one right-clicks on it to save it, the name of the file is The_bar_downstairs. This is the first picture I've ever seen of that downstairs area and I'm wondering about the orientation of the picture. I'm guessing it's facing east, which would put the entrance off to the left of the pic - am I right? If the photographer were facing west, there would be those three little cubby-hole windows that face out into the motor court behind the bar. So this is the room that Mr. Nesbit had turned into a billiards room at one time. Awesome.



The website is in French, so I'm guessing the picture sets labeled Dessins and Rendus are unbuilt designs and renderings, but I don't know whether they are FLW. In any case, they are fantastic.
Sample:


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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1517
Location: Fremont CA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 9:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The photo of the bar faces east, putting the entry hall behind the photographer and the front door behind and slightly to the left (as you face east)
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Robert



Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 42
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reidy wrote:
The photo of the bar faces east, putting the entry hall behind the photographer and the front door behind and slightly to the left (as you face east)

Yes thanks, that's what I figured. As you might guess, I've never visited the house. Being in Tucson though, I'm sure I'll get to L.A. again one of these days and hopefully the tours will be going again by then.

Before the renovation work started, the Ennis House website used to have several books available, including one for $10 that was basically a history of the house, including pictures of it's construction. I was wondering if anyone here has that book and what they thought of it.
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 9290

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 12:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The exterior wall of the billiard room is directly below the dining room. The "three little cubby-hole windows that face out into the motor court" are in a utility room used for laundry, located next to the entry and below the guest room adjacent to the dining room. Behind the bar is a trap door in the floor leading to steps down to a dirt-floored space that extends under the rest of the house, I believe all the way to the farthest bedroom ... although I never ventured that far.
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1517
Location: Fremont CA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 2:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If it's the book I remember, $10 was a lot to pay (unless you thought of it as a donation to the restoration, which was going noplace in those days). Some of the pages were semi-transparent paper which was probably supposed to lend an air of Serious Graphic Design but instead made the book hard to read.

Sweeney's book has good construction photos and costs, per page, only a fraction as much.
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Deke



Joined: 27 Jul 2006
Posts: 692
Location: Los Angeles

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 5:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Taggert House sure looks great. Did they replace all the wood? Looks brand new.

Deke
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1517
Location: Fremont CA

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 6:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes, the house received a major restoration a few years ago. It was in progress at the time of the 2005 Conservancy conference in LA.
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Robert



Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 42
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roderick Grant wrote:
Behind the bar is a trap door in the floor leading to steps down to a dirt-floored space that extends under the rest of the house, I believe all the way to the farthest bedroom ... although I never ventured that far.

That's interesting, I've always wondered what was under the floor. Is the space high enough for a person to stand up in, or do you have to crouch?

Interesting about the laundry room. According to floor plans I've seen, there is another little room on the other side of the entrance, just in front of the stairs. What's in there?
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Robert
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Robert



Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 42
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Fri Aug 22, 2008 10:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reidy wrote:
If it's the book I remember, $10 was a lot to pay (unless you thought of it as a donation to the restoration, which was going noplace in those days). Some of the pages were semi-transparent paper which was probably supposed to lend an air of Serious Graphic Design but instead made the book hard to read.

Sweeney's book has good construction photos and costs, per page, only a fraction as much.

OK, thanks for the info on the $10 book.
I have the Sweeney book, it's very nice and very informative.
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 6:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Robert, the space under the living room and bedrooms is irregular due to the dirt, which is more like the top of the hill than a level dirt floor. But it's on the tight side, averaging about 4 blocks high.

To the left of the entrance is a powder room and coat closet. As planned, instead of the large front door with sidelights located where it is between the two piers, the north part of the entry should be open, and the main entry art glass double doors at the inner set of piers. The perforated block walls flanking the entry (forming inner walls for laundry and powder room) were to be backlit making the entire walls light fixtures. Also, no floors should be marble; that's one of the changes Mable made that angered FLW so much.

I don't know what's what anymore, since I haven't been up there in years, but the original 1925 demand water heater was still there through the 90s. It was located in the laundry, and heated the master bath some 100 feet away. Needless to say, it took a while to get the shower hot.
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Robert



Joined: 19 Aug 2008
Posts: 42
Location: Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Aug 23, 2008 8:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roderick Grant wrote:
Robert, the space under the living room and bedrooms is irregular due to the dirt, which is more like the top of the hill than a level dirt floor. But it's on the tight side, averaging about 4 blocks high.

Interesting - thanks.

Quote:
To the left of the entrance is a powder room and coat closet. As planned, instead of the large front door with sidelights located where it is between the two piers, the north part of the entry should be open, and the main entry art glass double doors at the inner set of piers. The perforated block walls flanking the entry (forming inner walls for laundry and powder room) were to be backlit making the entire walls light fixtures. Also, no floors should be marble; that's one of the changes Mable made that angered FLW so much.

The way you explain it is pretty much the way I imagined Wright had intended, from everything I've read.

Quote:
I don't know what's what anymore, since I haven't been up there in years, but the original 1925 demand water heater was still there through the 90s. It was located in the laundry, and heated the master bath some 100 feet away. Needless to say, it took a while to get the shower hot.

I read that Nesbitt had a heating system intalled (I think it was he). Presumably it's forced air. Where are the mechanics for that located? The ducting presumably runs under the floor of the house, in the above-mentioned crawlspace. I think I remember seeing some registers in some pictures.

Another question: Is there a door between the entry area and the above-pictured barroom, or is it open?
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1517
Location: Fremont CA

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Don't know where the heater is. The bar opens off the entry hall through a regular door. It was originally a storeroom, converted in the Nesbitt remodel.
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Frankie-Oh



Joined: 07 Aug 2008
Posts: 27
Location: Iowa

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 4:18 pm    Post subject: Ennis House Reply with quote

Alas, the mention of the powder room and coat closet to the left of the entry brings up bad memories. A few years ago we were visiting my sister in Orange County. We drove up to tour the Ennis, and see Storer and Hollyhock, which wasn't open at that time. Apparently I had contracted a norovirus and began feeling green on the drive up. By the time we arrived at Ennis, I was desperately ill. I spent the entire time throwing up in that powder room or lying flat on my back on the bench in the entry. Darling hubbie, of course, toured the house, which I would have done too in his shoes. Pardon the graphic nature of this post, but I can also claim the distinction of having been sick on the grounds of Hollyhock. A charming trip all around.

A few months later, my little nephew, eight or nine at the time, filmed a commercial movie at Ennis. His parents got the free run of the place. This time I was green with envy. Shortly after that the mudslide occurred and the house was closed. I fear that it will never again be open to the public and that I lost my chance to see it. Hope I'm wrong.

I'll ask my brother-in-law to send me any photos he took during the film shoot. If they show any significant views I'll post them.
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RJH



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 682
Location: Fort Wayne, Indiana

PostPosted: Sun Aug 24, 2008 7:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Reminds me of Wright’s very first visit to the Mossberg house right after its completion. During the trip to South Bend, IN he became very ill. Upon arrival at the Mossberg house he walked right in and headed directly to the bedroom off the entry to lay down.

He knew exactly which direction to go!
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