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Sikkens Cetol 1 & 23 Plus / Natural Light
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5622
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stafford swears by this product, which was used for some exterior cypress at the Willey House:

http://www.cabotstain.com/products/product/Australian-Timber-Oil.html

Anyone else familiar with it?
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7615

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 2:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Paul, what do you think of wood brush sanders? Aren't they intended to remove finish without excessively altering the wood?
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dtc



Joined: 05 Mar 2007
Posts: 739

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 3:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just read the info on Cabot Stains... "re-apply every 1 to 2 years".

Really!
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5622
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe a little less work, but twice as often as Sikkens. Hmmm...
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you referring to a flap sander, Roderick ?

http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en&q=flap%20sander&oe=UTF-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi


The problems with sanding finished wood are twofold: the finish materials clog the sandpaper to one degree or another, and the finishes are often
harder than the wood, so it is difficult not to deform the wood when portions of the material remain coated with finish.

SDR
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classic form



Joined: 05 Dec 2006
Posts: 182
Location: Kalamazoo, Mich.

PostPosted: Mon Jan 23, 2012 8:03 pm    Post subject: Fladder Reply with quote

May be thinking of the Fladder sanding system

www.fladder.com
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sjnorris



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 74

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 11:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is what I had to say about Timber oil in my emails to Peter

After six years this is the screen,  the light areas are where the perforated bricks cover the screen.

Screen has one coat maybe two of Cabot Australian timber oil  and that was applied six years ago and hasn't been touched since.

There are a lot of good products that will work and last a long time.   If the  , Proper prep , Proper application and Proper maintenance is carried out.

I would like to add this was used on one screen at the Willey house only as test.

All other wood on the Willey house is treated with Cabot's semi-solid stain.

I don't know if  I would recommend for an entire house but it seems to work on the screen

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

dtc,

Cabot's Grey was specified in 1933 for the Willey house and some of the stain from 1933 is still intact on a few doors and covered windows.

The Willey house was coated with Cabot semi-solid oil stain over six years ago and has not been touched since.

I have applied thousands of gallons of Sikkens so i'm very familiar with the application , maintenance and the beauty if done correctly.

Link to Sikkens Application Guide

http://www.sikkens.us/en/Products/Decks/Documents/Decks%20Application%20Guides/Cetol%201%2023%20application%20guide.pdf

--------------------------------------------

There are many clear exterior finishes available today that will last a lifetime if the proper prep, application and maintenance is done by the home owner.

So do your homework and pick the best one for you<>

A few to get you started.

http://www.readyseal.com/

http://www.sadolin.co.uk/homeowner/products/exterior/

http://www.penofin.com/

http://www.permachink.com/llexterior.htm

http://www.timberprocoatings.com/wood-finishes/log-siding-stain.html

http://www.cabotstain.com/

http://www.sikkens.us/en/Pages/default.aspx
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7615

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 2:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Flap and Fladder come with sand paper. A brush sander is a rotating brush. Not sure what the bristles are made of.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 2:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks. Anything which is able to scour away hard finish material is likely to attack the softer parts of the wood grain, resulting in a texture much admired by certain Japanese crafters, I think. If one wants to retain a flat surface (and relatively crisp edges) to the wood, I would think that a sanding block would be the way to go. Broad surfaces would be sanded with an electric orbital disc sander, perhaps, and the recessed batten areas and exposed wood edges would be hand-sanded with a block shaped to fit the beveled edge profiles of the boards. Brass screws could be removed selectively in the areas being sanded, or they could be sanded in place if set fully flush with the surface.

Since we know that hard-film finishes will eventually weather and separate, unevenly, from the wood surface (an action accelerated by the movement of the wood due to fluctuations in temperature and humidity), it would seem advisable to investigate penetrating finishes such as oils, etc. These would seem, on the other hand, to invite air-borne contaminants to adhere to the surface of the wood, at least when the finish is still viscous, and to darkening over time ?

I would like to know what certain restored Usonians, such as Jacobs and Rosenbaum (both of which look great in post-restoration photos) were (re)finished with . . .

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7615

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 3:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I saw the contraption on "This Old House." The brush sander was used to smooth out old wood without removing its patina, as is usually the case with sandpaper. The surface was smooth, without that raised grain problem.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm. Wish I'd seen that. Sounds like a gentle process. Were they removing finish, do you know ?


S
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7615

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 9:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No. The boards were salvage from a 300-year-old house they were upgrading. They had grown dark with age. The boards were used for a table top, so the smooth quality of the finish would have been very important.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2012 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ah -- that makes sense. (I'm constantly seeing something new -- or old -- and useful on that show.) A powered brush, rotating about an axis parallel (not perpendicular) to the surface, might work well on Usonian siding, particularly on wood not subjected to film finishes. On a previously oiled surface, for instance, I can imagine a rotating brush cleaning the surface quite effectively . . .

SDR
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5994
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 9:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roderick Grant wrote:
I saw the contraption on "This Old House." The brush sander was used to smooth out old wood without removing its patina, as is usually the case with sandpaper. The surface was smooth, without that raised grain problem.



This Old House - Season 31 - Episode 14

The segment begins at 8:09 and is chapter 5 of 8 (after yet another commercial). The part of chapter 5 that is specific to the brush sander begins at 10:33.

The color of the brush sander made me think it may be a Makita product. And sure enough, it is: Wheel Sander.


David
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Jan 25, 2012 11:28 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting. I've never seen this tool. The brush "wheels" (cylinders) are about 4" wide. In the owner's manual PDF, page nine, several wheel options are shown, including a nylon brush (the default "sanding" wheel, apparently) as well as a wire brush wheel, a cotton buffer wheel, and an unspecified wheel . . .

It isn't apparent that this tool would work in the recessed batten area of a Usonian wall. However, for the plank surfaces, this might be just the thing. Any soft-pad sanding method is capable of softening sharp edges when it encounters them, however.

The literature mentions the the sander is capable of sanding into an inside corner; it isn't evident from the illustrations how this is possible. One would want to avoid running the machine at right angles to the grain of the wood . . .

SDR
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