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Robert Herberger House projects, 1955

 
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13936
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:21 pm    Post subject: Robert Herberger House projects, 1955 Reply with quote











Upper level

Ground level







Main level

Upper level

Ground level

all images 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7316

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As the drawings show, the house was quite modest at the beginning, shown in the first perspective, then blossomed into what would have been a significant accomplishment in the redesign with the concrete dome over the living room.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13936
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 12:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wright's only hemispherical concrete dome ? Shades of B Fuller, but in a vastly different material. This appears to be clad in Desert Masonry, as well.

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Herberger was planned for a hilltop, so the dome was intended as a sort of architectural apex. FLW did a similar thing for Donohue Triptych. That property was a hilltop that had been bulldozed flat, and which FLW wanted to restore. In that instance, the dome was to be of glass with adjustable shades to mitigate the extravagant heat gain of the desert location.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For a transparent/translucent dome, Wright might have explored a number of metal-and-glass geometries. (Fuller patented a "geodesic" dome in 1954.) The glass dome that comes to mind was the one for an ultimate version of the Jester project, made of horizontal layers of Johnson-style glass tubing ?

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While the Jester progeny for Huntington Hartford employed a full half sphere, the Donohoe dome was flatter, an enlargement of the Johnson dome ... as was the original Guggenheim dome.
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Tom



Joined: 30 Jan 2011
Posts: 1930
Location: Black Mountain, NC

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 1:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Never seen or heard of either of these projects before.
May need to bite the bullet and acquire the Taschen volumes.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13936
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Believe me, there's plenty in Taschen that none of us has seen before . . .

SDR
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Rood



Joined: 30 Oct 2010
Posts: 868
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 2:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Though now virtually surrounded by a large housing development, the site of the Herberger House remains virtually untouched, and clearly visible from Taliesin West, but particularly from the roof-top perch of the nearby David Dodge residence.

That Mr. Herberger was a good business man goes without saying https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herberger%27s , but purchasing hundreds of acres of empty desert north of Taliesin West in the 1950's, at a time when there wasn't a road within miles ... is probably the wisest business decision he ever made. For that we might suppose he has his son, Gary, to thank for at the time Gary was an apprentice at Taliesin West.

https://asunow.asu.edu/content/founders-day-honorees-gary-and-jeanne-herberger

www.mim.org/about/mission/jeanne-l-herberger/

www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2002/12/16/daily6.html
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 647
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like both designs.
I can't help notice that rendering technique on the perspectives is miles from the John Howe touch.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13936
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jul 15, 2016 9:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yup. No doubt Howe instructed many other drafters in his preferences if not his specific techniques -- with varying degrees of success. The effects are ultimately the result of Mr Wright's choices and preferences, we must assume.

SDR
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Rood



Joined: 30 Oct 2010
Posts: 868
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

PostPosted: Sat Jul 16, 2016 12:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR wrote:
Yup. No doubt Howe instructed many other drafters in his preferences if not his specific techniques -- with varying degrees of success. The effects are ultimately the result of Mr Wright's choices and preferences, we must assume. SDR


Don't know for sure, but I'd say a lot of the first presentation drawings were from Mr. Wright's hand.

The second set of drawings look more like the work of a young apprentice. Gary Herberger, perhaps?
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JimM



Joined: 06 Jan 2005
Posts: 1321
Location: Burlington, WA

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 4:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Predating Herberger by 4 years, the second scheme somewhat takes its cue from the concrete roof of the Cabaret Theater.

While very nice I wonder if the second scheme was a result of the first scheme not feeling quite at home in a desert landscape. The cantilevered rubble stone terrace looks incongruent with the general design, to me. A typical Wrightian prow would seem to have been fitting with the angular roof lines.

Actually, I never understood the cantilevered rubble stone terrace either. It appeared more and more, and David Dodge's later house comes to mind. Maybe the experiences with wood weathering in the desert took its toll??
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 13936
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2017 7:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the first scheme, I'm not able to coordinate the plan with the views sufficiently to locate and identify the cantilevered terrace under the side (flat ?) roof. Does that terrace in turn shelter something below ? That would be the only reason (other than a s e x y appearance) to cantilever it . . . I guess.

SDR
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