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Rose and Gertrude Pauson house
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, David. Better and better. I enjoyed the rest of Bob Mosher's story as well. I haven't seen either of these books before, and will go back at my
leisure to read more.


SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 4:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

DRN kindly contributes this pair of images:


44

45
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 5:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent reporting on one of the most important designs of FLW's career. I admit that I didn't scrutinize every word (the eyes glaze over when confronted with too much text on a computer), but if it has not been addressed, what is the structure of the short return in the corner? The mitered window is half on the ledge of the terrace and half within the terrace wall. Is the return masonry or wood?

To Spelling Nazi, SDR, I'm sure would like to know...:
Muntin [also glazing bar, astragal, muntin bar] is a strip of wood or metal separating and holding panes of glass in a window or door.
Mullion is a vertical structural element which divides adjacent window units or double doors.
Transom is a horizontal structural element above a door or window, also lintel. It is also used as a shortened form of transom window, which is a window hinged to the transom above a door.
Common (non-architect) usage has all but eliminated muntin in favor of mullion to define the dividers between lights, while some differentiate between horizontal transoms and vertical mullions.
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Jeff Myers



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 1761
Location: Tulsa

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 5:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay I was correct in my placement which is scary since I did not know where the house was. Any guesses as to what the Hexagonal(thing) is. If any body is going to Phoenix and plans on going to the Biltmore please get us a picture of the aerial of the house.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

All good. Reading the Arizona Highways article is worth the time, as it gives some interesting information about the arrival of the owners on their first day in the house, and some unique impressions of the house as experienced at different hours of day and night.

Bill's photo 40 (previous page) seems to show clearly a wood box, the full height of the masonry parapet, occupying the corner of the living room.

As I use it, astragal is reserved for the molding that allows a pair of doors or windows to close to each other. (I also learned, not too long ago, that
doors are "french" only as pairs.) But dictionaries vary in their definitions of these terms, I suppose. I am disappointed that my smallish
architectural dictionary isn't as useful for such terms as is my old Webster's New World College Edition. Thanks to the traditionalists,
muntins will be with us for a while, I guess -- even when buried, flat and unconvincing, within insulating glass !

Nowadays, a spelling or definition is only a click away. When I'm unsure, I just Google the word.

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 6:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To assist in the matter of the corner construction, this photo seems to show that no masonry was employed in that area, on the left side
of this view. Oddly, we have no photo of the finished house taken from this terrace -- at least, I have seen none.

46

This photo has a further use; it confirms a detail of the floor plan published in the Arizona Highways piece, namely the "carpet" contained within the
stone border of the floor. Inside, this area was covered with carpet -- envisioned in the original design ? -- while outside it presumably was left bare.

SDR
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Jeff Myers



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 1761
Location: Tulsa

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 7:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For whatever reason I am not working on the sketchup model for the reason it has taken me time and I have finished the house to the best of my abilities and I leave it to anyone who knows how to use sketchup is welcome to finish it. I am proud of what I have done and I think I have done the best to what I can do. It is my greatest honor to have researched this home and someday I plan to write a book on this House.
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wjsaia



Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 211

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 7:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, I see SDR has jumped on this quickly, even as I was preparing a response to Rod Grant. Well, here it is anyway; thanks, SDR. I've got one more coming after this, too.

Roderick Grant wrote:
. . . , but if it has not been addressed, what is the structure of the short return in the corner? The mitered window is half on the ledge of the terrace and half within the terrace wall. Is the return masonry or wood?


It was wood in this case, basically a solid closure. The evidence is that a concrete element would have survived the fire and none appears in this photo of the ruined building:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/donkeyfunk/124050753/in/set-72057594100018689/ [It's the same post-fire shot from the terrace that SDR has just posted. How do you do that, SDR?]

How to treat these elements is difficult, and I've confronted it myself repeatedly. On the one hand, one seeks to accentuate the continuity in this case of the low concrete building wall under the tall windows behind the bench seat running out to to become a free-standing exterior parapet wall. To my mind, an ideal solution is for the returning piece of glass to drop down off the parapet wall to floor level, but that would require notching the glass, which we used to think couldn't be done (it can), or assembling together two or more pieces of glass to appear as one. Actually, I think this does happen at the Berger house, but I'm not positive. John Lautner certainly was never daunted by such a prospect. To miter and return the windowsill to the first mullion is perhaps a safer and less challenging solution, but I don't like it so well. Even then, however, there is still the option of glazing below the returning sill, but that wasn't done here. I think the question of how to terminate the bench played a role, so a solid "infill" solution was employed . . . and made thick enough to form a substantial corner ledge so as to accommodate the placement of objects.

Additionally, I can too easily imagine thinking it desirous to express an accentuated degree of continuity for the two major glazing arrays in this Living Room. That might, for one thing, suggest using the same sash detailing in the mitered corner window section, extending the typical wood sill and bottom stile (or "bulkhead") pieces and mitering them around the corner, perhaps to terminate against the first terrace mullion. But I think FLlW handled this masterfully here. (No surprise to that!) He acknowledged that there are two distinct arrays of glazing, and he separated them by means of this minimally framed, mitered glass corner assembly really, a magnificent outcome. It's fairly apparent from what little we've seen that how to handle this particular detail remained indefinite up until the last minute. The preliminary plan even includes FLlW scratchings of active sash coming to the mitered corner, incidentally. Such an "explosion of the box" demonstration, however, would have meant, at minimum, the presence of two vertical meeting rails in the corner we have now come to love so much for its expansive stationery glass miter!

Well, it goes on and on. Personally, I like keeping this thread near the top of our forum's list of discussion topics. Thanks to all who have expressed a shared delight in this particular exploration and, as always, to SDR for precipitating it to begin with.

Bill Schwarz
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wjsaia



Joined: 26 Aug 2006
Posts: 211

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 8:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Jeff Myers wrote:
. . . Any guesses as to what the Hexagonal(thing) is. . . .


Jeff, thanks for your efforts along the way on this thread of our forum discussion.

Has this question been dangling before us? If so, I have not consciously absorbed that there has been a general wonderment, because I naturally assumed EVERYONE would know that it was a pre-existing water storage tank that FLlW had to accommodate into his design for the project. Whether he enclosed a round wood tank with hexagonal concrete walls and a roof, I'm vaguer than vague about. There seems to have been a rectangular element that partially intersected the hexagonal element, too. (?)

I have no idea how I came to this understanding, but I have thought it common knowledge for longer than I am particularly happy to acknowledge. You know what . . . maybe that's not a water tank.

SDR, did you draw that lovely site plan to start off this thread? If so, what was the source of your information? I have forgotten where a complete plan of the project has been published. I know there is one somewhere that would include the carport and . . . um . . . the . . . um . . . water tank.

Bill Schwarz
WJS
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 8:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Heh-heh. I've been there too ! I must admit I've never heard that there might have been a water tank there -- though it makes perfect sense.

No, I didn't draw that nice little plan; it's found on page 58 (at very small size -- out comes the pocket lens for the camera) of Sergeant's book. It
wasn't until today that I noticed, via my enlargement, that one or two segments of the hexagonal roof in the drawing (the only reference to
anything existing there, until today, that I have seen*) have a different texture. And, thanks to DRN and a Mr Gronek, I had an instant photographic
confirmation of something taller than the hex roof, casting its shadow from the same portion of that roof.

Do you agree that the lighting of that form, in the aerial photo, suggests that the roof (or whatever) might be concave ?

By the way, I came up with that terrace shot from an online source like yours, perhaps (?); because it wouldn't let me drag it to my iPhoto library,
I just took a shot of my screen.

SDR

*though one of your color photos has some masonry forms at that location, come to think of it
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PrairieMod



Joined: 24 Feb 2006
Posts: 457
Location: www.prairiemod.com

PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The discussions around this fascinating house made me remember something that might be of interest--when the PrairieMod Squad last visited Taliesin West, we were told that these perforated designs found in the house were originally from the Pauson House:



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Jeff Myers



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jun 02, 2009 11:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

They saved them from the fire?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

So, they are mounted outside of clear glass, somewhere at T West ? They appear to be light in color. I wonder if they could be pierced ceramic plaques ?


SDR
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Jeff Myers



Joined: 22 Feb 2009
Posts: 1761
Location: Tulsa

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 12:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Either that is Sun Trap at Taliesin West or Drafting room or Office but I can't remember that much from 2 years ago when I went in October 2007.
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Wed Jun 03, 2009 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Scroll down about halfway on this page to see some more photos of Pauson (though the first one is obviously mislabeled) - mainly of the ruins. There is also a rendering of "Oasis", the plan for an Arizona State Capitol.


David
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