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Rose and Gertrude Pauson house
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 708
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 6:06 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Roderick,
Speaking of Montezuma -- I'm not versed in the different cultures of Aztec, Incan, and Mayan.
I know FLW had the phase where it was attributed that he drew inspiration from some or all of them.
I saw in a movie where one of those civilizations would chop off the head of an unlucky sacrificial human and throw the decapitated body down a monumental flight of temple stairs as part of the ritual. You don't think FLW was dangerously flirting with monumental stairs leading up to a structure on a temple mount, do you? if so, perhaps it wasn't draperies after all, but rather a lightning bolt from an angry & impatient god who had not received a timely sacrifice...
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SREcklund



Joined: 26 Feb 2013
Posts: 611
Location: Redondo Beach, CA

PostPosted: Tue Nov 22, 2016 6:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The roof of the loggia at Hollyhock House would make a wonderful site for a sacrificial altar ... there's even a set of "monumental stairs" ... Very Happy


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"Youth is a circumstance you can't do anything about. The trick is to grow up without getting old." - Frank Lloyd Wright
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7492

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 2:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

... and we're back to Shannon Tweed in all her glory.

The bifurcation of approaches at Northome, Winslow and Tomek were a definite attempt to take inevitably grand or long entrances down a notch, to force the visitor off axis, make the monumental less monumental. The problem with Pauson is that the monumentality is not mitigated in any way. Judging from the drawings, the stair was planned as built, but it is a one off. There is nothing else like it, a long, grand pedestrian approach to a modest-sized house. Probably it was FLW's way of dealing with the difficulty of a vehicular approach up the hill in the simplest, most direct way. Contriving a different approach might have been too cute by half.
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David



Joined: 27 Sep 2016
Posts: 100
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 5:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If one day I can visit a reconstructed version of the Pauson house and I put myself right in this place:



What song would I put on my headphones? Stairway to Heaven, maybe?
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Rood



Joined: 30 Oct 2010
Posts: 897
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 6:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David wrote:
If one day I can visit a reconstructed version of the Pauson house and I put myself right in this place: What song would I put on my headphones? Stairway to Heaven, maybe?


We would all love to see a reconstructed Pauson House ... one ever better constructed than the original. However, it won't be at the original site, because a four-lane extension of 32nd Street runs through it.

The approximate location of the house can be seen north of Camelback Road and south of Lincoln Drive ... between East El Camino sin Numbre on the east and East Palo Verde Drive on the west side of 32nd Street. It can't be missed, because a steep road cut can be seen on both sides of 32nd Street, which eviscerated much of the hill.

The triangular Boomer House is located just west of 30th Street ...and almost straight west of the Pauson site. See the Google Map (below) and click on the "earth" view.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/32nd+St,+Phoenix,+AZ+85050/@33.523029,-112.0133837,76m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x872b704362319e03:0xc6a341059097f07b!8m2!3d33.6828513!4d-112.0138136
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

David's impressive and exciting model, and the unique view presented above, really do bring us once again into Wright's head. Suddenly we have a phantom object far more convincing than the fantasy architectural creation in Hitchcock's "North by Northwest" (yet another example of fictional evil associated with modernist building going back at least as far as Edgar Ulmer's 1934 "The Black Cat").

When I first apprehended Kallmann McKinnel & Wood's design for Boston's new city hall, I found myself humming parts of Francis Poulenc's Concerto for Organ, Strings and Tympani. The exciting power and compelling movement of the two compositions seemed akin, and I imagined a visual presentation that would combine them temporarily into a single entity.

What music, if any, does the Pauson residence suggest to readers ?

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 708
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beethoven's 7th
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5589
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2016 11:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Nimrod Enigma Variation lX, Elgar- mainly because of the tragic loss of this perfect work of architecture, but also the feeling of the infinite space surrounding it. Had the building survived, it would certainly be another choice of music. But in the case of Pauson, I can only feel loss.

Most will probably say this music is much too sentimental, but isn't Pauson an example of Wright at his most romantic?

Here is an extremely moving performance:

https://youtu.be/hEl4WrfX8lg
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1343
Location: Northern CA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Janacek Sinfonietta
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David



Joined: 27 Sep 2016
Posts: 100
Location: Spain

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 4:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR, good question. Now that the model is made, I obviously hope to make an animation someday. The question therefore is very timely and I take good note of your suggestions.

Classical music is usually the first choice for the practical reason that the copyright has prescribed.

I found this on the internet:

Lloyd Wright compared his theory of organic architecture, the theory of growing a design from a single seed and elaborating on it, to Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. He saw parallels between architecture and the way that Beethoven took five incredibly simple notes and built an entire complex symphony out of them.

I am sure you know this old animation:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KoaxrJOk5A

I like the way the author has linked the motion of the camera with the music (even if it seems a bit fast in this case)

Another option is a music more associated with his time. Maybe Jazz music? (Even if I'm not a big fan).

The peterm idea seems good to me, I also imagine a slow music and a slow camera motion and the emotional connection with the loss of the building is a good reason to do it that way
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Last edited by David on Thu Nov 24, 2016 3:39 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7492

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 12:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Elgar is fittingly somber, so also Samuel Barber's "Adagio for Strings," if a bit shopworn. I would also suggest Grieg's Air from "Holberg Suite." A bit into Tchaikovsky's morose 6th, the tempo takes off, and one can practically feel the heat from the Pauson conflagration.

For the Kallmann et alia Boston City Hall, perhaps something from Justin Bieber, the early years?
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 1:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Guess one doesn't have to be a Bostonian to hate on the City Hall !

I think of it as suave Brutalist, or Romantic Constructivist, perhaps ?

Happy T-giving, wherever you may be . . .

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

While we're throwing around great works of music, I'll mention a piece I just heard, in an exemplary performance (by the East Coast Chamber Orchestra), the 1880 Tchaikovsky Serenade for Strings. After the first movement we enter a world of delicious discord -- suspension and resolve piled one upon the other, modern as all hell, still moving when employed to equal effect by Samuel Barber in 1936 in his well-known Adagio. These things bring tears to my eyes -- perhaps especially when in a vulnerable state following too much work and not enough sleep . . . !

SDR
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3164
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 5:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As I never developed an ear for classical music, I'm unable to name pieces, but I'd imagine a piece that builds as one ascends the stair, has a respite in the tunnel, bursts a bit with the sunset at the western view, a short brood in the entry passsage, followed by a big climax upon reaching the living room view to the mountains.
Could be classical, but Dick Dale could do it justice on a Stratocaster too I imagine.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14328
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2016 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't see why not.

My own experience leads me to think that our musical -- indeed our aesthetic and even gustatory -- tastes are largely determined early in life, either genetically or by early exposures. Experiences missed cannot influence us at all, either positively or negatively.

As to the assignment of (any) musical work to an example of (any) visual art, this is not logically defensible, and is going to vary widely among individuals. But it's an interesting exercise. My case, mentioned above, wasn't a conscious effort; it was spontaneous, as I guess any indefensible choice had better be !

SDR
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