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FLW and mortar joints questions
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pharding



Joined: 25 Jun 2005
Posts: 2203
Location: River Forest, Illinois

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR, Those pieces are absolutely beautiful! They use aesthetic principles of Frank Loyd Wright without replicating his work.
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Paul Harding FAIA Owner and Restoration Architect for FLW's 1901 E. Arthur Davenport House, the First Prairie School House in Chicago | www.harding.com | LinkedIn
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 9:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Gustavo. Nice to have you here on Wright Chat.

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 7:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Paul. It will be obvious to many that Wright has had a big influence on me -- I was introduced to his work at an early age. In addition to being a Wrightian, I am also a constructivist; in most of my work I like to see the bones of the thing and am happiest when every part is a necessary part and you can see what it is doing. For me a satisfying design marries a robust structure to a desirable form.

Most of the tables I have been doing are "opened" with glass or even punctured, so that the interior and the structure are part of the experience. A flat opaque slab has little interest for me. As a result, these dining tables aren't always the best ones you could find for spreading out the laundry or wrapping the birthday presents !

A table is like a building in its essence, to me; maybe that's why I pursue this object so relentlessly. Besides, making things -- in the mind, on paper, and with material, is just such a kick -- and if some wit can come through in the results, it might even succeed. . .

Thanks for your kind words. And thanks to David for letting me digress on his thread ! Stephen

http://www.flickr.com/photos/14287804@N07/sets/
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Michael Shuck



Joined: 06 Apr 2006
Posts: 176
Location: Wichita, KS

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 8:44 am    Post subject: Last Post on Oct 21 Reply with quote

Stephen,

I thought your remarks about a table being like a building. and your other remarks in that post to be just wonderful.

I wish you'd write a book about all this stuff you know...seriously!

Mike
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 7615

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 3:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first "building" I have fond memories of when I was very short was comprised of the underside of a massive Duncan Phyfe dining table with ten chairs and a crocheted table cloth.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 4:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I like that. Did the lace hang down in silhouette, like a band of art glass ?

Table as tree ? As four-legged animal ?

Tables with interesting structure, particularly those with solid tops, are often more interesting from below.



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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 5:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you, Michael. I'm sure others know more about all these things than I do. It takes a while to begin to see what one's own contribution might be. I appreciate the indulgence of others to let me "think out loud" about what is what.

In the meantime, I'm happy to answer questions. There are certainly a lot more tables and other pieces, on paper; I've been accumulating work for a long time, without exposure or feedback, in blissful isolation, following my nose, as it were, in search of meaningful structure and form. Certain themes have emerged. . .

SDR
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5994
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

From the low-angle view, the tables look like wonderful bridge structures.

Stephen, thanks for posting your terrific work and ideas. I really enjoy seeing and (hopefully) learning from them, too!


David
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2007 6:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This may be the most unforgivable Usonian tribute yet -- but it is
based on an idea, to create an indoor/outdoor experience in an
ordinary room, with a roof-like overhang above which the indirectly-
lighted space is of indeterminate dimension, like the sky. . .


Text reads: "idea of last week - (shameless idolatry) - cabinetry
(modular), to be used continuously around the room. . .w/ integral
lighting, of course"



A couple of tables:



And a bed:
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Oct 24, 2007 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Various objects involving lighting:




Furniture structural systems










Lanterns made with tapered siding (?)


Torchiere


Up-down lighting









Lamp with miter-folded cellular polycarbonate shade
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Oct 25, 2007 2:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote


A table designed to a playful order: boards in each of the axes -- x, y and z -- are con-
sistently oriented. There would be a piece of glass, or a raised server, in the center.


An echo of the Prairie


Design for a small deck with bench, planter and hot tub
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Oct 26, 2007 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What you see in these examples are simple, (mostly) rectangular parts and pieces, assembled as simply as possible into visually and physically robust objects, usually symmetrical in form but often with a liveliness of profile.

To the extent that this description resembles the work of Mr Wright, these objects resemble that work. It is certainly distinct from the more restrained, less romantic sort of modernism that most laymen think of as "modern design."

Other work, which I will show in a new thread, has less to do with Wright's influence -- at least in an obvious way. But once under the influence, we are never the same, I believe. What architectural designer, in love with his materials and with richly-articulated space, can fail to be in love, lifelong, with Frank Lloyd Wright ?

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2007 2:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Still looking for answers to the question of Wright's earliest use of raked-bed-filled-head brickwork: Here's the presentation panel for the Husser house of 1899 (Wright passing through the Renaissance, on his way "home" ?).



The inscription reads: "Exterior walls faced with dry-yellow Roman bricks. Horizontal joints wide and raked out to emphasize horizontal grain. Vertical joints stopped flush with mortar the color of the bricks. Stone trimmings. Terra cotta capitals. Frieze in stucco relief. Soffits plain in plaster. Roof covering of light red flat tiles without modelled trimmings. Hips and ridges clean."

"Interior walls of lower entrance and principal rooms lined with slender Roman bricks - light tan in color carying gold insertion and inlaid bands of olive oak. Plaster dead gold."

SDR
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 5994
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great work, Steven! That moves things up a few years further.


Looking through Storrer once more, makes me wonder if Rollin Furbeck (1897)


(image from "delmars.com")


or the second-story brickwork on Heller (1896)


(image from "bc.edu")


could also be of similar design?



David
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 14603
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Mon Nov 05, 2007 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good questions, David. Storrer is little help to us here, though he says the Heller house has yellow Roman brick and "white stone" so it may be that this house matches Husser in regards to brick detail. But it doesn't really look like it in your photo (are the uppermost walls maybe made with alternating courses of slightly differing bricks ? Note that the rear chimney seems to reverse this order)) so maybe Rolin Furbeck is our earliest candidate. . .

SDR
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