usonian tile

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Guest

Post by Guest »

Speaking of bathrooms, anyone see the one at Taliesin West a few issues back in the Quarterly?



The article was about the recent renovations, so I assumed the bathroom shown was such. It is really wild in stainless steel. Wright was either a lot hipper than I ever imagined, or it's a modern addition, only added for "style".



Also, can someone please tell me with certainty if AC was added at TW before or after Wrights death? I can see him both resisting it to the end, or accomodating those who were maybe getting a little tired of camping. Did he himself start adding glass surfaces with or w/o AC as additional texture? or only as enclosures for AC?

KevinW
Posts: 1282
Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Taliesin West

Post by KevinW »

Regarding Taliesin West, the complex was never intended for year round use, but as it became headquarters for archives, Architects, etc... the need for it's current poor air conditioning was a reality. So, indeed that is a post FLLW addition.

The board and batten aluminum bathroom was in fact from the days of Mr. Wrights era, and the well researched renovation/restoration by Fellow Arnold Roy is a treat to examine.
KevinW

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