Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

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DavidC
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Joined: Sat Sep 02, 2006 2:22 pm
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Video: 'That Far Corner - FLW in Los Angeles'

Post by DavidC »


SDR
Posts: 19066
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

One among many aspects of the film: Millard is seen entirely unfurnished for a change, and we see the slab floor with incised unit lines. W A Storrer tells
us that Wright later called this his "first Usonian house." And, we view the exterior of the bedroom stack at the rear of the house, with continuous vertical
openings that might harken forward to the Fallingwater "tower" of spaces.

I'll leave the insidious suggestion of darkness and death in the Los Angeles houses to others . . .

S

Reidy
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Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2005 3:30 pm
Location: Fremont CA

Post by Reidy »

That wasn't the only time in LA that he presented a multistory interior as as a single space. The mitered corners of Freeman, though only two stories tall, resemble (maybe even more strongly) the corner tower at Fallingwater. The main facades of Storer and the bedroom wing of Hollyhock are other cases in point.

SDR
Posts: 19066
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Very good point.

Having again seen the Los Angeles houses together, I can repeat that my favorites are Storer and Freeman, the former most of all. I first read of the architect's
disappointment with Storer in Sweeney's "Wright in Hollywood," and I continue to be, in turn disappointed by that reaction.

My favorite block pattern, however, is Millard.

Favorite images of the two houses:

ImageImage

Image

Image

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The interior of Freeman places that house in the top ten, easily. Storer is wonderful on the exterior, and very good inside, but it cannot compare to the brilliance of Freeman.
Given a chance, but for Mabel, Ennis could have surpassed them all.

SDR
Posts: 19066
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

A matter of taste and personal preference, I suppose: Two quite different spacial experiences, sharing an axial symmetry but oriented and exposed quite differently to the view.

http://www.michaelfreemanphoto.com/medi ... orer-house

https://www.curbed.com/2017/6/8/1574211 ... os-angeles

For me Ennis lacks their clarity of plan, but of course it's got drama, even grandeur ?

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10014
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The difference between Freeman and Storer is that the former is like being out in the open among the treetops, while the latter is an enclosed redoubt.
The way the columned walls of the living block are arranged as 16" columns and 32" windows, does not invite the view much at all.
Yet both are splendid.

SDR
Posts: 19066
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

What is Freeman aligned with�Highland Ave ? I wonder if the tree(s) that partially block that vista are on the Freeman lot. A mix of foliage and view might be hard to maintain�but worth the trouble ?

It was interesting to hear the opinion expressed that a possible scenario might include the demise of a building once past its natural lifetime. We’ve heard something of this sort already, in connection with Freeman ... and the rejoinder that a complete recreation would be preferable to giving up altogether ? Now about funding ...

S

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