Essay from Heritage Auctions on FLLW

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Tom
Posts: 3214
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Essay from Heritage Auctions on FLLW

Post by Tom »

https://blog.ha.com/2018/10/draftsman-f ... og4-101118

Interested to hear what some of you have to say about this.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Too bad Harold Price, Jr. didn't build that version of Jester. He told me that the house he did build was wonderful, bot "so damn big!" Of course, by the time he and Caroline stocked it with children, they would have long outgrown the house, but it would have been great to see a perfect version of one of FLW's finest designs built. Pfeiffer is nice, and it adapts to the desert environment, but the original version would have been so much nicer with the stone pillars and the "infinity" swimming pool.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Or, how about Affleck II, also based on Jester---thought Pfeiffer oddly omits that in his Monograph text, referring only to the larger Loeb project.


Image

Take your pick of plans:

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The second view is the one sold by Heritage Auctions . . .

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Image

images © 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

© 1986 A.D.A. EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

We haven't seen elevations of this second house for Gregor Affleck---but one of the surprises revealed by the two mismatched view drawings is that
one of them has the upturned radiused roof-edge detail that is found at Lowell Walter, while the other has an unheard-of downward-turned roof edge.

S

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Nice catch on the down-turned roof edge.
I missed it.

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

On the Affleck II plan and the VC Morris plan from the other thread, both circular house schemes show living rooms with columns in the corners.
This is unusual, no?, as all residential Wright designs after the 1940s or so featured living rooms with cantilevered corner window "releases" with mitered glass....?

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes. What makes the difference is that the Jester family of designs---see the plans above, on this page---depend on a peristyle: a continuous row
of columns creating a rectangle in plan. In this instance Wright recalls the Greeks---another of his "exceptions that [somehow] 'prove' a rule."

Draw one of those plans with the corner column missing. How does it look ? How far apart do you place the columns nearest the missing corner ?
It really derives its visual strength from the completion of the "box"---in this case. And not just visual strength; how would the architect support that
cantilevered pergola outside the peristyle, with the corner column missing ?

Of course, Mr Wright plays with the peristyle as only a modernist would, by interrupting it with solids, deploying a pattern and then causing it to
intersect other patterns, solids, and voids: symmetry made asymmetrical, astronomical collisions in a solar system, a universe of his own devising.

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Perfect, SDR. For other examples see Mono #8 for C. R. Pieper page 198, Jack Hennessey 246, #1 for Duey Wright 251, and Harvey Furgatch 377.

In each case, had the plan consisted of rows of square or rectangular piers instead of round columns,
the corners would have been either open or would have terminated in a wall. See Sunday House, S. 393.

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

Thanks SDR, a very illuminating reply... Were there any perspectives drawn for the Affleck II or Morris living room? (The Jester living room is circular a la Lykes)

DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

Another modernist to take the peristyle for a test drive was Paul Rudolph at his Wallace house of 1961. The plan and general feel is more formal/classical in some respects than Wright’s, likely due to its symmetry.
Worth a look to compare and contrast approaches:

https://www.paulrudolphheritagefoundati ... -residence

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Usonian-era interior perspective views are, oddly, quite rare; indeed they were not often produced in any period of Wright's career. (Two that I can think of
from the Prairie period, for the Shaw and Robie projects, turn out to be the work of George Mann Niedecken.)

There were a couple made of the Suntop Homes, and one of Hoult; both of these are section-perspectives in which some connection to the exterior of the
building is included; indeed this is true of the majority of the late-period interior views---Miller-Monroe and Price Tower are two more that come to mind.


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Image . . Image

jay
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Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

Ah well... I have a limited ability to imagine spaces from floor plans; in this case, not having a Wrightian 'peristyle' to reference at all, I'm afraid I can't really grasp how the main space would appear.
(Certainly not the intersecting patterns, solids, and voids you are able to see.)

In the Affleck II design, perhaps Wright isn't making an exception to his rule, regarding "released space"––I notice the roof over the living area, which he labels the "patio living room", has a "glass top".
I assume that feature would more than adequately make the living room a fully "released" space, regardless of corner columns.
This line of thinking comes from one of my favorite quotes from the Donald Hoppen book:

"Wright hated the "trapped space," the dark corner where the cornice joins vertical wall to horizontal ceiling in the traditional house.
At one Sunday talk Mr. Wright said to us, "Boys, you must learn to avoid the re-entrant angle––the acute angle in a ceiling terminating against a wall––
which traps space and avoid an angle in which space cannot be released through an opening or skylight.""

The VC Morris house does not appear to have a skylight feature in the living room.

SDR
Posts: 19816
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I don't have enough data about any of these unbuilt living rooms to be able to conceive of how they might feel. I do see the top-lighted "lantern" over the Affleck II space; a precedent here is the Lowell Walter living room:

https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/cont ... rmat=1000w

We might note that this is not the only feature shared by the two designs; there is the upturned eave detail and the heavy cantilevered and punctured eyebrow around the central space.


The V C Morris House 2 living room is surmounted by a roof terrace which serves the "penthouse" master bedroom.

S

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