Prairie Style landscaping advice, circa 1915

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Paul Ringstrom
Posts: 4349
Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Prairie Style landscaping advice, circa 1915

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

Tom
Posts: 3209
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

I downloaded.
Pretty cool

KevinW
Posts: 1287
Joined: Sun Feb 06, 2005 6:41 pm

Post by KevinW »

Landscaping for a an organic, integral approach to an organic Architecture still never seems to be resolved. Granted, home owner associations, planners etc don't really give a damn what is really appropriate.
If the concept of planting what is or was native to your region, much could be done to help with pollinators, reduce water consumption, reduce chemicals, etc..
I enjoy the times my native gardens go dormant nearly as much as when they are in full bloom.
KevinW

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10302
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

I suggested to my brother as he was building his suburban house that he use native plants for the landscaping, but he said the community disallowed them. Kentucky blue all around.

I have always felt that the over-hybridized rose was less attractive than the wild rose, which is very small, and invariably pink.

Rood
Posts: 1171
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Roderick Grant wrote: ...... I have always felt that the over-hybridized rose was less attractive than the wild rose, which is very small, and invariably pink.
" ... the wild rose, which is very small and invariably pink." And ... very tasty!

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