LeGuin, Maybeck and Frank Lloyd Wright

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
jay
Posts: 284
Joined: Mon May 02, 2016 8:04 pm

Post by jay »

LeGuin's descriptions of fictional material culture, cities, streets, parks, houses,
clothes, music, food, agriculture, rocketships, are all secondary but well drawn and appealing.
Nature is well described too.
Her center of attention however is personal, social, political - in a broad sense.
Her essay celebrates how the Maybeck house allowed the "inhabitants" to fulfill the total aesthetic experience. Therefore, the spatial house becomes the stage, the residents become the actors.

Or to my examples earlier, "Wonderland" is the stage––the mental space the reader "lives in"––while Alice and her adventures are the center of attention, the actors, the inhabitants.

Michael Pollan has a good line about the process of writing.... 'The subject is the landscape, the story is the path that leads through the landscape.'

I believe Le Guin is discussing the relationship between spaces and their occupants, how she sees it idealized in physical architecture, and how she's reflected that relationship in her mental spaces of literature.

SDR
Posts: 19463
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Sounds like an appealing and believable description of her work. Now to find out, by actually reading some of it ?

S

Tom
Posts: 3194
Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

May I recommend: "The Left Hand of Darkness"
This is one of her early works before her famous "Earthsea" trilogy.
I read the "Earthsea" books first. Absolutely love them.
"The Left Hand of Darkness" however is unique and a real sleeper.
It's about a planet whose inhabitants are and can be both male and female.
It's respectfully done and the emotions are never overblown.
Very cool book.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10205
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Sometimes a writer's first attempt is superior to later efforts. "Renascence" is greater than, or at least as great as, anything Edna St. Vincent Millay wrote subsequently. Thornton Wilder's first novel, "The Cabala," was much better than his last, "Theophilus North," which was basically a revision of the first. Harold Robbins' second novel, "The Dream Merchants," was brilliant (even though the movie sucked). In reviews of his many subsequent novels, one critic called him a famous typist.

Post Reply