Name of mid-century glass alternative?

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Matt2
Posts: 230
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Name of mid-century glass alternative?

Post by Matt2 »

The mid-century architect I'm researching/writing about used an interesting alternative to glass. This was comprised of two sheets of fiberglass separated by a matrix of hexagon shaped dividers. The material allowed in some light but also provided a bit of insulation. Anyone heard of this stuff or know its trade name?

DRN
Posts: 3944
Joined: Mon Jul 10, 2006 10:02 am
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Post by DRN »

A product like what you describe is currently produced as "Panelite"
https://www.panelite.us/

Similar in some respects to Kalwall, but with a thinner section and little to no insulation in the sandwich that I know of.

At Carnegie Mellon in the '80's we experimented with a Kevlar and Nomex (honeycomb) sandwich as structural panels and tubes...the Kevlar was not at all translucent though.

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