Preservation Magazine Article about the Grant house in Iowa

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DRN
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Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

Preservation Magazine Article about the Grant house in Iowa

Post by DRN »


JPB_1971
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Post by JPB_1971 »

Thanks for the link to this article. I've always liked this house. The interplay between the massiveness of the roof form and the lightness of the fenestration has always been interesting. The stonework must have taken forever to complete given the size of the raw material!

I wonder just what exactly is meant by "massive restoration"? It is different from the Walter house - this will need a subsequent sympathetic owner to maintain it as a private residence.

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

This house has always intrigued me as it seems to be somewhat of an anomaly in Wright's Usonian period. It's too bad about the cold. Maybe this house would be a candidate for double or triple pane glass? The stonework is handled in an unusual way. Was that Wright's decision or the Grant's?

Rood
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Post by Rood »

peterm wrote:This house has always intrigued me as it seems to be somewhat of an anomaly in Wright's Usonian period. It's too bad about the cold. Maybe this house would be a candidate for double or triple pane glass? The stonework is handled in an unusual way. Was that Wright's decision or the Grant's?
The plan of the Grant House ... the 'idea' of the house ... was based on the slightly earlier Pauson House. As for the stone walls and other questions ... you can find most of the answers here:

http://www.flwrightgranthouse.com/

Paul Ringstrom
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Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

The quantity and quality of the masonry in this building is simply amazing and wonderful.

It is too bad that to make this house livable year-round will require a complete re-thinking of the living room glazing to incorporate some 21st century technology.

peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

We are going to Cedar Rapids sometime next week, and were wondering whether anyone had contact info for the residents or owners of the Grant house. Any tips would be helpful. Let me know and I will give you my email address...

Thanks.

hypnoraygun
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Location: Missouri

Post by hypnoraygun »

EDIT: relayed info to PeterM
Last edited by hypnoraygun on Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Yes, I still have the sbc... Thanks so much! I got your email and sent one off to the address you gave me. Hopefully it is still working. I'll keep you posted...

peterm
Posts: 6196
Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

We will get to meet David Grant (son of the original owners who, as a child, helped to build the house...) on Monday for a tour. Thanks for the leads, David and Craig, they worked like a charm!

Hopefully, he won't mind if I snap a few pics.

hypnoraygun
Posts: 561
Joined: Wed Mar 22, 2006 1:28 pm
Location: Missouri

Post by hypnoraygun »

We will get to meet David Grant (son of the original owners who, as a child, helped to build the house...) on Monday for a tour. Thanks for the leads, David and Craig, they worked like a charm!

Hopefully, he won't mind if I snap a few pics
I'm glad to see someone is having some luck getting in there, I don't know what the magic word is, but if anyone can share it, it would be appreciated!

Paul Ringstrom
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Joined: Sat Sep 17, 2005 4:53 pm
Location: Mason City, IA

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

This house is also included in the tours for this year's Conservancy Conference in Mason City on October 10-14.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Peter's photos, taken yesterday:


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peterm
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:27 am
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

This is truly an amazing house! First of all, the site is remarkable, sitting on 60 acres of verdant rolling hills. The stonework is unique to Wright, with thousands and thousands of small, thin pieces of limestone held together with deeply recessed mortar, creating the impression that the stone is just precariously stacked. The steel t mullions, painted Cherokee Red, are the same as those used at the Walter house (Cedar Rock) and create a crisp and thin skeleton for the expansive glazing. The interior woods are cypress, contrasting with much lighter birch in key spots. The house retains much of its original furniture.

Thanks for posting, SDR..

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Lucky for Grant that Cedar Rapids is not exactly the place to be, so it's less likely that the property will ever become more valuable without the house, as happened to Gordon. It was possible to save Gordon by moving it miles away, but hauling Grant anywhere would be impossible.

Peter, I've always wondered about one little oddity at Grant, and didn't find out its purpose when I saw the house years ago. There's a space open to the grand hallway between the two fireplaces in the living room and dining room; did you find out what that was about? If not, I hope someone who goes through the house this year asks about it.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
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Post by SDR »

Image

drawings ©W A Storrer

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