Before Eames Was Eames,...

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peterm
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Before Eames Was Eames,...

Post by peterm »

and still under the spell of Eliel Saarinen:

https://www.zillow.com/homedetails/4-De ... 7086_zpid/

Reidy
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Post by Reidy »

This could be a movie set of the era - Lubitsch or Cukor directing Irene Dunne and Melvyn Douglas, or a melodrama of infidelity with Joan Crawford in the lead.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Saarinen Sr is the note. Were all Cranbrook architects under the spell . . . ?

S

peterm
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Post by peterm »

I’m not sure. But the loosely structured curriculum must have created an environment that nurtured the growth of American modernism, with students and teachers like Harry Weese, Charles and Ray Eames, Ralph Rapson, Florence Knoll, Jack Lenor Larson, and Harry Bertoia. Maybe it was that Saarinen knew how to not get in the way of the curiosity of the students?

The exquisitely detailed, yet spatially classical and conservative Saarinen house at Cranbrook:

https://www.artandarchitecture-sf.com/t ... house.html

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Excellent. Definitely not a proponent of Loos and "ornament is crime" . . . !

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Did you hear that Florence Knoll died at age 101 in January?

SDR
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Post by SDR »


peterm
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Post by peterm »

A giant.

Meisolus
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Post by Meisolus »

I'm pretty in love with this Eames house. I'm just waiting for there to be a murder at a dinner party and Hercule Poirot show up, looking exactly like David Suchet, of course.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

There is a history of interesting properties being used as settings for (mostly) European TV-movie productions. I have shots of one that I'd like to identify . . .

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

This episode appeared on a PBS station in December of 2012.


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JChoate
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Post by JChoate »

That Poirot series is a treasure trove of great architectural settings, one right after another. A few years ago, my daughter & I enjoyed together watching reruns of that 1980's era series on DVDs I'd inherited from my father. Only then did I realize that the Deco streamline moderne building (Florin Court, 1936) represented as Hercule Poirot's residence (the fictional "Whitehaven Mansions") was a couple hundred feet from a brutalist YMCA building where I lived briefly (on the edge of the even more brutalist Barbican) in London. I was there in the mid-80's at the same time that show was being produced around the corner, but I didn't know it at the time.

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More about Florin Court:

https://thelondonphile.com/2013/04/17/florin-court/


SDR, if I find the time I'll go thru those DVDs in search of your mystery house to see if it is mentioned in the credits.


The Eliel Saarinen House interiors are beautiful. Note that the rugs on display were designed by his daughter Loja Saarinen. Earlier we've seen the custom rug she designed for Edgar Kaufmann's FLW-designed office -- discussed in this thread:
http://wrightchat.savewright.org/viewto ... bc879b6cb1

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Excellent. So, we wonder if the interiors of "Whitehaven Mansions" (gracious. . .) were accurately replicated for the studio set(s) of Poirot's quarters (and in one case, a neighboring unit) . . . or if the set design is a (delightful) invention.

I think the De La Warr Pavilion that was featured in an early episode of the show would have set the tone---the 'thirties London, but with a decidedly modernist bent ?

In a similar vein (i.e., European TV series) the hilarious "Crime Scene Cleaner" series which has appeared here recently has also had some interesting location sets. I wish I had grabbed shots of one I saw the other
day, a nifty Hamburg (?) office building of indeterminate vintage, of which we see both the suave street elevation, a tiled stair, and a luxurious wood-paneled office (square panels, some of them cabinets), all Moderne---or modern . . .

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-RkxpOVihtCQ/T ... ware13.jpg

"Following the launch of the ITV series Agatha Christie's Marple in 2004, the Poirot series was retitled Agatha Christie's Poirot. The previous titles and theme
music were dropped. The visual style of these later episodes was noticeably different from earlier episodes: particularly, austere art deco settings and
decor, widely used earlier in the series, were largely dropped in favour of more lavish settings (epitomised by the re-imagining of Poirot's home as a larger,
more lavish apartment)"

http://investigatingpoirot.blogspot.com ... -2005.html

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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

For the Agatha Christie film fan, don't forget the 4 Miss Marple movies from the 60s starring Margaret Rutherford: "Murder, She Said" (1960) "Murder at the Gallop" (1963, with the hilarious Robert Morely) "Murder Most Foul" (1964) and "Murder Ahoy" (1964). Agatha thought Rutherford, a chubby, waddling woman, was all wrong for the part, and would have preferred the emaciated Estelle Winwood, who fit the character in the novels more closely. Estelle did play the nurse to Elsa Lanchester's Jessica Marbles in the 1976 comedy, "Murder By Death."

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