Ingraham House in Fargo, ND

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Rood
Posts: 1135
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Ingraham House in Fargo, ND

Post by Rood »

I believe there is an older thread devoted to this house in Fargo, ND, designed by Mr. Wright's granddaughter, Elizabeth Wright Ingraham, but here's the latest news ....

https://www.inforum.com/news/985672-His ... -levee?utm

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10024
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Looks grim for Elizabeth. That I assume from the headline, since the text of the article is blanked out, my not being a subscriber to Inforum.

About the only thing that could save the house would be to move it and turn it into a publicly accessible building of some sort, which would cost a fortune. Fargo seems an unlikely place to lure fans of architecture. Other than the setting for the opening scene in an old movie, and the place from which I order my yearly supply of lefse, what does it have going for it?

Rood
Posts: 1135
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

Roderick Grant wrote:Looks grim for Elizabeth. That I assume from the headline, since the text of the article is blanked out, my not being a subscriber to Inforum.

About the only thing that could save the house would be to move it and turn it into a publicly accessible building of some sort, which would cost a fortune. Fargo seems an unlikely place to lure fans of architecture. Other than the setting for the opening scene in an old movie, and the place from which I order my yearly supply of lefse, what does it have going for it?
Oh, sorry about that. Maybe this will suffice:


  

'Historically significant' house could face demolition for flood levee
Fargo City Commission decides to start negotiations, but final decision on home's fate lies ahead

Written By Patrick Springer Mar 11th 2019 - 7pm.

Windows wrap the entire side of the John and Sherri Stern home that faces the Red River. It reflects Frank Lloyd Wright's idea of letting the outside in and the inside out.

FARGO � City Commissioners gave the go-ahead for city staff to start negotiating buyouts of four properties in the Belmont neighborhood despite reservations that it ultimately might force the demolition of a historically significant house.

The commission’s unanimous decision Monday, March 11, came after a discussion in which Commissioner John Strand vowed to oppose the destruction of any historically significant building if a solution that is technically and financially feasible can be found.

“Somebody needs to stand up for these structures that don’t have a voice,� Strand said.

The home at 1458 S. River Road belongs to John and Sherri Stern and was designed by Elizabeth Wright Ingraham, the granddaughter of noted architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

The home, built in 1958, represents a rare example of mid-century modern architecture and is on the National Register of Historic Places.


City engineers have proposed buying the homes to make room for an earthen levee � a section of flood defenses that will protect the city’s water treatment plant, which the city considers critical infrastructure, as well as other homes and buildings in the area, north of Lindenwood Park, from Red River flooding.

“Because of the weight of an earthen levee, it has to be built farther from the river bank. City officials have said that a floodwall, which is lighter, would be too expensive.

Because of unstable soils in the area, and because heavy equipment to build the levee would be forced to operate so close to the home, contractors don’t want to build there, city engineers said.

“Ultimately, it’s a risky, costly endeavor,� even if the goal is to save the house, City Commissioner Tony Gehrig said. The city could “break� the house trying to save it, he said.

John Stern, who attended the meeting, said he had no objection to getting the home appraised and starting negotiations � but he believes the house can and should be saved.

“It’s an architecturally significant home,� he said. It would be technically possible to save the house, though he added it would be difficult and might be too costly. Stern said he would not “stand in the way� if the cost came in at $2 million, which he said he doubts.

Strand said that if it proves impossible or unaffordable to save the house, “I’m there with Mr. Stern.�

Commissioner Tony Grindberg said he wants to see more detailed information, including additional engineering analysis, before he votes on whether to buy the house for demolition.

Mayor Tim Mahoney said there have been months of engineering studies, but the stubborn problem is the unstable soils in the area.

“I don’t think you’re going to find an engineering solution to go behind the house,� he said.

City commissioners also were briefed on preparations for the spring flood.

In the National Weather Service’s latest flood outlook, issued last week, the Red River has a 95 percent chance of reaching 31.1 feet, a 10 percent chance of reaching 38.2 feet and a 5 percent chance of reaching 39.1 feet.

Major flooding starts at 30 feet. The record 2009 flood crested at 40.84 feet.

City staff are drawing up plans, preparing for a tabletop planning exercise, and taking inventory of the materials and equipment that will be needed for the flood fight.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Did the 2009 flood reach the house ?

The article was open for me, and I'm not a subscriber. Go figure . . .

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lefse

S

Rood
Posts: 1135
Joined: Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Location: Goodyear, AZ 85338

Post by Rood »

SDR wrote:Did the 2009 flood reach the house ?

The article was open for me, and I'm not a subscriber. Go figure . . .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lefse S
No sure about the 2009 flood, but evidently we'll find out very soon how threatened the house is and was:

https://www.inforum.com/news/988478-Far ... -be-needed

SDR
Posts: 19093
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

As I write this, "historic" flooding in Wisconsin is being reported . . .

S

Matt2
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Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Post by Matt2 »

Is there really anything in Fargo worth these efforts to save?

SDR
Posts: 19093
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Don't ask the residents of Fargo that question . . . !

S

Matt2
Posts: 217
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Post by Matt2 »

It would no doubt make them both very angry.

SDR
Posts: 19093
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Aw. And Frances McDormand was so good in the Coen Bros. movie, too . . .

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2018/s ... ilm-ranked

S

dkottum
Posts: 425
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

Matt2, specifically, what city might my two friends in Fargo move to for a better life? I'll suggest it to them.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10024
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Moorhead, MN just across the Red River is nifty.

dkottum
Posts: 425
Joined: Sun Jan 09, 2005 8:52 pm
Location: Battle Lake, MN

Post by dkottum »

I think most small cities are "nifty" compared to the automobile hell our large cities have become.

SDR
Posts: 19093
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Yes . . . and the "boon" of car-call services has contributed mightily to that hell, in direct opposition to the claimed benefit (i.e., getting
more private vehicles off the streets): 40,000 new vehicles, driven by amateur cabbies, descend on San Francisco on any given day.
Sweet . . .

S

Matt2
Posts: 217
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2018 1:07 pm

Post by Matt2 »

I was joking.

I prefer smaller cities as well. In fact, as the world is becoming more urbanized, with mega cities (Shanghai has 20 million), I believe we need to find a way to place limits on city population. There's no reason why workers in San Fran or NYC should spent all their money on rent when they could work in Detroit and afford to buy a house....

Much of the great mid-century architecture we enjoy is due to the affordability of land in what were then smaller, more sparsely populated cities.

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