What would you do . . . ?

To control SPAM, you must now be a registered user to post to this Message Board.

EFFECTIVE 14 Nov. 2012 PRIVATE MESSAGING HAS BEEN RE-ENABLED. IF YOU RECEIVE A SUSPICIOUS DO NOT CLICK ON ANY LINKS AND PLEASE REPORT TO THE ADMINISTRATOR FOR FURTHER INVESTIGATION.

This is the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy's Message Board. Wright enthusiasts can post questions and comments, and other people visiting the site can respond.

You agree not to post any abusive, obscene, vulgar, slanderous, hateful, threatening, *-oriented or any other material that may violate any applicable laws. Doing so may lead to you being immediately and permanently banned (and your service provider being informed). The IP address of all posts is recorded to aid in enforcing these conditions. You agree that the webmaster, administrator and moderators of this forum have the right to remove, edit, move or close any topic at any time they see fit.
SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Heh. Always with the mot juste -- or the ee-maj juste ? (And color-coordinated, too.) Merci !

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10182
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Is there an indication of which came first, the gables or the hips?

SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

In David De Long, "Designs for an American Landscape, 1922- 1932," pp 54-55, we find the most complete display of the drawings for the Lake Tahoe Summer Colony. Among them is the full sheet on which the Shore Type
Cabin plan, previously posted here and published by Robert L Sweeney, is drawn. Above the plan is an elevation of the Shore cabin, and here at last we see the source for the colored sheets under question at the top of this
thread.

Like the plan, which is split into two halves showing upper and lower floors, this elevation presents two versions of the roofs to the paired bedrooms mentioned by De Long in his text. One of the roofs is gabled -- the only
gabled roof shown in any of the Tahoe project finished drawings, of cabins and of floating craft. The plan shows identical roofs, apparently the chosen hipped variety, in outline, on both halves of the drawing.

We also have, on the same page in De Long, a rude sketch of the Shore Type in perspective, also exhibiting the two roof variations found on the elevation.

De Long's captions, text, and illustrations:


ImageImage



Image


ImageImage



© 1996 by David G De Long, by Harry N Abrams, Inc, and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation ............................................................................................................................© 2019 by ArchiTech Gallery

SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

So, to answer Roderick's question, the gable and the hip appeared together, at least briefly, with the gable being discarded as the design moved forward -- or at least that is the suggestion given by the visual documentation that we have . . .
. . . and the colored drawings of unknown origin that we have seen, neither add to nor subtract from that conclusion.

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10182
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Or perhaps they are hip, left, and gable, right, fraternal rather than identical twins?

I am inclined to go with the hip, which seems consistent with the rest of the building, while the gable is at odds with the main roof.

SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Certainly so -- and in keeping with all other roofs in the project, as well ?

S

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10182
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Well, without examining the rest of the lot to be certain, yes.

SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

There are four cabin types and four barges. Two of the barges have what appear to be fabric roofs hung and/or stretched from a horizontal spar or ridge; these could be called "gable" roofs, I guess.
There are also hipped solid roofs in evidence. All the cabins have variations of hipped roofs.


Image . . Lodge. . .Image . . Fir Tree


Image . . Wigwam . .Image . . Shore

SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Image . . . Fallen Leaf . . .Image . . . Catamaran


Image . . . Family . . . Image . . . Barge for Two


. . all drawings © copyright the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Post Reply