Video tour of "Grandma House."

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SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Video tour of "Grandma House."

Post by SDR »

I was surprised to find no previous thread devoted to the Harold Price Sr house -- nor indeed mention of it here, in Search or on Google, though that can't reflect the history, can it.

Nevertheless, I found this informative tour of the house given by Frank Henry.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KRe7CiLFa_Q

Perhaps this has been presented previously ?

S

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The video has not been shown before, but there are mentions of the house floating out there in the ether somewhere.

This is another of FLW's houses that needs to be experienced first-hand to be fully appreciated. Turquois, a common color in the 50s, works well in this house; it's hard to imagine the place without it, and with a brownish red instead. It is also the best example of Gene Masselink's artistry.

peterm
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Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

Post by peterm »

Wonderful!

Roderick’s correct. I’ve never truly appreciated this house from looking at photographs, but this video has changed my mind completely. Frank Henry is a model docent. The workspace is a delight to see.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'll begin a visual record with incidental concentration on the master bedroom modification. The bedroom addition does not appear on view drawings or sections, nor on Maynard Parker's early color photo, but is present on
the elevation sheet and on the published plan (5419.005)

It is a pleasure, at last, to see close-up color images of the "dotted-line" metal structural posts -- for instance . . .


Three screen shots from the Frank Henry video:


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Image 5419.003


Image 5419.005


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Maynard Parker photo


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Maynard Parker photo


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Maynard Parker photo


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© 2009 by TASCHEN GmbH, and © 1988 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

© 2014 by U-Haul, Inc

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10120
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

That huge master bedroom, with its 36' long closet + a 4'x8' WIC, seems like FLW was saying to Price, "You want a bigger bedroom? I'll give you a bigger bedroom!" ... without grace.

Notice how carefully the vertical joints are arranged on the canted columns in the Parker b&w photo. As the blocks rise, with the 3/8 overlap, making each level 3/4" larger all around, the size of blocks change in order to keep the joints in line, left and right, up 10 courses, then with a single full block centered for the top 8 courses. The attention to detail is extraordinary.

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Roof system ...?
Did Wright develop this or was it proprietary from elsewhere?
Steel grid and lay in "tectum" panels - probably asbestos
or some kind of fiber cement mix
Anybody got the skinny here?

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Could the roof planes possibly be as thin as they appear in the sections ?

One of Parker's photos, the vertically-oriented one above, shows something above the decorative copper-work that doesn't seem to appear in, for instance, his color image --
even though that b+w shot is taken from a lower angle than the other. Granted, they show different roofs; maybe the atrium roof is made differently from the carport cover ?

S

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Interesting questions
The section sheet you posted shows roof details in the middle of the sheet.
Looks like steel channel welded to the grid forms the structural fascia.
Two layers of "substrate"
I bet one ( the "tectum" panel) fills in between the steel
Maybe the other (concrete?) is poured over top.
Then adhered membrane ... I don't know.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Image


Image


Image

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

In the 50's the final layer would probably be tar and not
an adhered membrane .... right?

Stephen, can you get those details?

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

All I've got are the section drawings above, from Monograph 8. I'm looking at the steel in the ceiling photos -- major members, presumably structural,
and minor ones, supporting the Tectum in the manner of a dropped ceiling ? I see no indication of any of that in these small-scale sections . . .

S

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

The detail drawings in the middle row of that sheet beginning from the left are roof details

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Right -- here they are; good luck !


Image


Image

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

So, the taller roof-edge profile is associated with the "portico roof" -- presumably covering the atrium -- as seen in Parker's photo of same, while the roof with "6-inch C and I steel sections" has the lower profile seen elsewhere in the photos . . . ?

S

Tom
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Joined: Sun Jan 30, 2011 7:53 pm
Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Yep
And the fiber roof panels are something like 4� thick
And then a layer of 2� insulation
Very thin roof
Atrium roof has no insulation layer of course

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