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Ron Olsen modelmaker
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5850
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 7:40 am    Post subject: Ron Olsen modelmaker Reply with quote

https://www.wisconsinlife.org/story/retired-architect-creates-models-frank-lloyd-wright-designed-structures/

(Thank you, Paul Ringstrom, for making me aware of this.)
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16301
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

At 1:31 and at 2:25 Mr Olson is seen with a model of Lamberson, I believe . . .

SDR
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5850
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

That’s right.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16301
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 9:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

. . . and again at 3:36. Did Mr Olson visit the house, do you know ?

S
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8611

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It would be especially interesting to see models of buildings either no longer extant (Angster) or which were not built properly (Ennis).
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Paul Ringstrom



Joined: 17 Sep 2005
Posts: 3974
Location: Mason City, IA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 12:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR wrote:
. . . and again at 3:36. Did Mr Olson visit the house, do you know ?S


Mr. Olsen was supplied with drawings, of the Iowa houses, from the archives at Columbia to facilitate his current model building.

He is in the process of building models of all of the FLW Iowa houses, at our request, for display at our Architectural Interpretive Center in Mason City.
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Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5850
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 4:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR wrote:
. . . and again at 3:36. Did Mr Olson visit the house, do you know ?

S


No, he didn’t. It would have helped. There are a number of innacuracies. But I’m happy and grateful that he took it on..
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Reidy



Joined: 07 Jan 2005
Posts: 1445
Location: Northern CA

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 4:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When you say that the model contains inaccuracies, does that mean it's inaccurate to the house as built, to the drawings or to both?
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5850
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 8:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually, both. The problems are mainly with the model’s roof. The actual Lamberson roof in Oskaloosa was built as Wright intended.
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peterm



Joined: 13 Mar 2008
Posts: 5850
Location: Chicago, Il.---Oskaloosa, Ia.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2018 10:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote









Do any of you remember the magazine “Highlights” from your youth? There was always a page that had two slightly different drawings next to each other, and the object of the game was to locate the variations (mistakes) in one of the drawings.
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3592
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 9:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Other than the differences between the spacing of the living room window mullions/sashes and those on the model, my eye is immediately drawn to the model's chimney mass and carport roof which seem to have a different relationship with each other on the model vs. the house....and the carport skylight placement seems further removed from the masonry mass than it is on the house. More specifically, the model's chimney mass is not the vertical extension of the masonry walls below the fascia line as is seen on the house. This may be causing the model maker to "fill in the blanks" with roof shapes toward the back of the carport that aren't matching the as-built house.

There may be other differences, but those are the ones that initially caught my eye. It should be noted however, if Mr. Olsen was working from a floor plan and published photos alone, he may not have been able to see and understand all of the facets of what is admittedly a complex roof form to model.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 10:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I attempted to find a good aerial photo of the house on Google Earth but was disappointed . . .

SDR
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Matt



Joined: 25 Nov 2009
Posts: 429

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 10:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

As an avid model maker, I've always thought an FLW Museum should have models of all his designs. But there's an aesthetic component to any model. Back in the Wright's day, a model would attempt to reflect materials, colors, and even foliage. Sometimes this worked to good effect, but often it came across as a cheap model-train set. More recent models would "abstract" a lot of those elements, using one material like bass wood, and rendering any plantings in an abstract manner. The volume is what mattered. Of course, models at a huge scale, like MOMA's Fallingwater, can be very true to life.

The Lamberson model pictured here seems to lack detail to my eye: no roof texture and no brick texture. I'd rather have that texture rendered in bass-wood than the color of the material.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16301
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2018 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Any reduced-scale depiction of an architectural object will necessarily omit detail, whether the depiction is rendered in two or in three dimensions. Only
today, when digital "models" are typically drawn at full scale, allowing the viewer to zoom into the depiction to any degree desired, do we have
"drawings" of the object rendered at full scale -- though full-scale drawings of architectural details have always been a part of the designer's vocabulary.

So, physical architectural models have always represented only some of the object's qualities. There is a tradition of monotone modeling -- models
made of basswood or other material wherein no attempt is made to depict the colors found in the building object. Another tradition, one more
appealing to the layman, certainly, is a full-color rendering of the building. And, as Matt says, foliage is also subject to varying degrees of abstraction.

The one constant that's universally accepted is that detail, where present, will be rendered "in scale." That is, a roof slope with 34 courses of shingles
will not be shown with 17 courses (for instance) simply to enable the maker to achieve a recognizable shingle texture. Rather, the scale of the model will
determine what level of detail will be depicted, just as is the case with traditional two-dimensional architectural illustration.

A model lacking depiction of material texture is no less legitimate than one lacking depiction of color; these are (as Matt suggests) simply two of the
choices available to the physical model-maker, who must, depending on the scale of his depiction, necessarily select which aspects of the architectural
object to ignore or omit.

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8611

PostPosted: Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

However a model is scaled or finished, it is a valuable tool for explaining the structure, especially for those who don't know how to read architectural drawings. There is value in any of the approaches.

The block houses have been modeled in the blank basswood style at significant scale to good effect by, I believe, USC students. When MoMA held its FLW retrospective in 1994, there were full-scale (partial) models of Jacobs I (explaining its construction) and the San Marcos Project that were very effective. Also a monumental model of the Illinois Skyscraper rose up in the tall lobby of the museum. Colored models certainly help the laity, just as the perspectives by MMG help bring line drawings alive.

In the '90s, an 1/8", uncolored balsa model of one of the Hollyhock couches helped raise funds for the reconstruction.
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