House for E Clarke Arnold, Columbus, WI, 1954

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Tom
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Post by Tom »

Aguar has a dedicated section critical of the 30/60 in Wright's work.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Aguar ? Remind me . . .

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Wrightscapes
by the Aguar's
History of Wright's work through lnadscape perspective
educational and informative

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Ah, yes. Well, I'd better add that to the library. I've just made more room here for books, by getting rid of my ancient KLH 17s and using the space for more shelves . . .

And my Taschen volumes now each has a shelf to itself, for easier access and longer life.

Happy Fourth !

S

Tom
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Location: Black Mountain, NC

Post by Tom »

Tom wrote:One of these days I may own the Tasch Vols.
Only construction shots I've ever seen of Bazett are found in Sargent.
Sargent does not have the series of construction shots I'm thinking about regarding Bazett.
They are in some book somewhere though.

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Tom, I recall seeing drawings of Bazett, as well, but I cannot find them. The bit of information that seems to have been published in only one source is in the Gebhard/Zimmerman book, "Romanza," which includes the plan of the guest wing added by Franke, the second owner (page 44).

The thinness of the roofs and trusses suggest the entire thing was built of 2x4s.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

1939 Bazett plan:

Image



"Romanza" plan:

. . . . . . . . . . . . .Image
Last edited by SDR on Thu Jul 05, 2018 1:28 pm, edited 2 times in total.

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

I'm not seeing the trusses you're talking about . . .



Image


Image

photos © Simon Clay


Image

photo © Esther Born


Image

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Where the sloped ceiling meets the flat ceiling -
I think there is a steel beam along that line from masonry to masonry
at "line of soffit"
The construction shots I am thinking about show it
... according to memory
Still looking for those shots

In any case, I would think the "honeycomb" glass walls provide
greater resistance against the roof forces.

Great drawings and photographs by the way ...
Thanks SDR

I see no indication of trusses either.
But the support of that roof is amazing

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Yes. It's almost as if the glass planes that are largely perpendicular to the ridge and eaves are taking thrust loads from the roof, in the way that flying
buttresses do -- and we know that ain't it. If the rafters are 2x4s or 2x6s, there could be custom flat steel angles bolted to them at the joints that would
help make the roof retain its shape . . . I suppose.

SDR

Tom
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Post by Tom »

But don't you think the glass Frames must be taking some of that load?
... got to be.

outside in
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Post by outside in »

Wright loved showing off his ability to eliminate the need for collar ties. It would be best to think of the flat roof and eaves over the glass bays as "horizontal beams" that tie together the two ends of the living room. The eaves act as structural components in the same way as buttresses, but at 90 degrees to the vertical plane of the wall. Smith house in Jefferson has similar framing.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Thanks, John. That's the "neglected aspect" of roof structure that's easy for me to forget. It would be fully operable only to the extent that the roof was a stable plane -- sheathed with plywood, for instance ? I suppose that was common practice for Wright, starting . . . when ? When did plywood come online as a building material ?

Heh-heh -- I wonder if some of that lovely plywood on the ceiling is more than decorative: heavier than 1/4", and/or nailed and glued in place . . .

SDR

SDR
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Post by SDR »

I wonder if one of the attractions of a low-pitched roof, for Wright, whether hipped, gabled or shed, was that it would tend to produce less diagonal thrust . . .

I still marvel at the memory of the video interview with Brandoch Peters, who remarked that his father had admitted at one point that he couldn't always
prove with numbers the validity of a certain structural solution he'd specified. He just knew it would work. That video was presented here, some years back.

Sounds like my way of working: seat-of-the-pants engineering. Of course, I work at the scale of furniture . . . !

SDR

edit: sp of Brandoch
Last edited by SDR on Fri Jul 06, 2018 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Tom
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Post by Tom »

Found the construction shots of Bazett:

Masterworks
BBP
170-171
"Building the Usonian House"

Long steel beam clearly shown spanning length of living room.

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