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Video: Barton House renovation update - Buffalo, NY

 
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 6448
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 10:12 am    Post subject: Video: Barton House renovation update - Buffalo, NY Reply with quote

Barton House Update - [2:31]


David
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8458

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

On reason Barton fared better than Martin is that a long-time owner was an architect who had respect for the house. Without her, I doubt it would have survived in as good condition as it has.
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3545
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 11:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've always liked the Walser/Barton/DeRhodes/Horner plan type. Barton was likely the most lavishly detailed and substantially built of the type.

From the Walser NRHP Registration form:
Quote:
The Walser House became a template for some of Wright's other small homes of the Prairie period,
including the K.C. DeRhodes House (South Bend, Indiana; completed 1906) and the L.K. Homer
House (Chicago, Illinois; completed 1908, demolished). The Walser House also displays many of
the aesthetic and planning elements that would become famous in his much larger Prairie School
homes, notably the Darwin Martin House (Buffalo, New York, completed 1905) and the Frederick
Robie House (Chicago, Illinois, completed 1909).
Within a year of the home's construction, the versatile Walser House design was used as the basis of
another Wright home, the George Barton House (Buffalo, New York; completed 1905, NR
#86000160). Darwin Martin reviewed several Wright designs when commissioning a home for his
sister Delta and her husband George Barton. Martin chose to simply replicate the Walser design
because it was in Martin's words it was "a simple, inexpensive house which [Wright] can furnish
blueprints of with no work on his part." Martin upgraded most of the interior and exterior finishes,
replacing the Walser House's wood frame, stucco, and wood shingles with more expensive Roman
brick and clay roof tiles. However, Martin did retain the basic composition of Wright's Walser
House, literally copying the Walser plans, elevations, and even art glass windows.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Apr 11, 2018 3:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The video page is dated this year. I had thought the Barton house already restored at some time in the past; I recall photos then showing,
among other things, the delightful projecting gutter system that shows daylight between eaves and gutter.

Anyway, it is a delightful "baby brother" to the Martin house. Bravo for a completed restoration to the compound.

SDR
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JonasBa



Joined: 05 Apr 2018
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did not know that. It explains a lot of things then. I'm glad this was the case as it's a truly unique building.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 10:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interestingly, those gutters appear different in various photos. Here's the earliest one, I guess, found in Ausgefuhrte Bauten:





Then, images found online:




The not-so-often-seen side of the house.




Trees appear at various times, in various placed, around this structure.











And, lest we forget the symmetrical nature of the plan:

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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sat Apr 14, 2018 10:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One more exterior view, this time from the 'eighties (I suppose), published in Monograph 2. Still another location for the "wandering Yew" ?

Note shadow on wall of roof and spaced gutter. Yet this gap doesn't show on the rear, from this viewpoint. Maybe the things float up and down -- or in and out -- based on time of day, weather, mood . . .




photo Futagawa
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 884
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 6:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR
On that first photo (the oldest, black & white one) at the left side where we see thru the covered porch, we see a strange silouette on the underside of the roof form. Maybe it's a canvas awning with a scalloped edge, which would be a common thing for turn of the century porches. Not, however, a thing I've ever seen on a prairie house.

In your last photos (the 7th & 8th ones) it looks like the hip ridge is showing a bit of the same deflection condition as you identified in the Heath House. Looking at the preceding photo (the 6th one) we see quite a lot of snow on the roof, suggesting how much snow load those cantilevered roofs must support. Seeing the roof snow drifts oozing a foot or so over the edge in several places its hard to understand how the gutters remain attached to the eaves.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good one. Turn-of-the-century architectural imagery -- most of it informal, but not excluding architects' presentations -- are rife with assorted window treatments, including random placement of window awnings.

One constant in these three images is the saw-tooth "hemline" to some awnings. I'm looking for a delightful drawing, possibly by Wright, with randomly placed pairs of awnings deployed. The structure is a multi-
story office/commercial building, pre-1900 I believe.


. . . .


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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The snow photo is interesting -- wind-sculpted forms, possibly indicative of building aerodynamics under certain circumstances ? Yes -- poor roof gutters !

One more thing: the street-side ground-floor window has an integral brick planter/plinth. A band of masonry at its vertical center-point is disturbed in some way. Could there have been something mounted there, at some point ?

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 7:40 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The interior: two photos of the dining room, slightly tweaked to bring brightness (value) and color intensity closer to conformity, and a photo of the Martin
house dining room from a novel viewpoint.

(Bill Schwartz has reminded me that San Francisco's "Victorians," with their elaborate exterior carpentry, were not originally painted in three colors, as we
often see them today; a few, however, are found in the tri-color schemes found in these photos -- if one substitutes a dark warm red for the woodwork --
a scheme I find particularly gratifying. The red is often be confined to the doors and sash . . .)













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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 16032
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2018 8:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Maybe the 1890s were the high point for window awnings in Chicago. Here's Mr Wright, and the Francis Apartments, 1895. While the awnings might appear at first to be randomly distributed, in fact the array on each wing facade is symmetrical . . .

(But, this isn't the rendering I was looking for.)


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