Video: F. B. Henderson House - Elmhurst, IL - for sale

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SDR
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Post by SDR »

Delicious rendering, and beautiful drawing set from Monograph 1:



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© 1986 A.D.A EDITA Tokyo Co., Ltd. and by the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

This house interior is as close as we may ever come to seeing the interior of Hickox. Their respective Trinity Rooms are equal, end to end, at 54'9".

SDR
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Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Measurements provided in the basement indicate that the main space above is approx 20 feet wide.

I wonder if the twinned lighting fixture over the dining table is original to the house. Its planar geometries seem a bit early for 1901 ?

The spindled grill or screen on the east side of the entry porch, absent on the west side, perhaps responds to the asymmetrical placement of the entry door, both visually and as an acknowledgment of weather . . .

SDR

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

Though quite different, there is a planar aspect to the Unity Temple lights, above the globes. I would have to see a clearer view of the Henderson fixture to be convinced one way or the other.

There are also spindles in the garden wall (perpendicular to the entry) in front of the stair/lav/trunk closet above and the maid's room below. Perhaps they were meant to be complementary? If there were spindles on both sides of the entry, it might have looked too confining.

Roderick Grant
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Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

One thing I noticed while Googling through the Henderson neighborhood: The buyer of the house would be within walking distance of 8 to 10 churches. Seems like an Elmhurst religious nexus. I wonder if the tintinnabulation of the church bells on Sunday is coordinated.

SDR
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Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

"I wonder if the tintinnabulation of the church bells on Sunday is coordinated." Wouldn't that be an (ecumenical) miracle. Turns out there's a precedent:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venetian_polychoral_style

SDR

DavidC
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Post by DavidC »


DavidC
Posts: 7784
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Location: Oak Ridge, TN

Post by DavidC »


SDR
Posts: 19419
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

Two items of interest are seen in the first construction drawing above. One is the inclusion of a "suspended gutter" to the roof. We know that Mr Wright
generally omitted normal gutters and downspouts from his drawings, though any of his Prairie period houses have gutters built into the roof edge. Here
we have an outboard gutter specified by the architect. I can't say what the vertical triangle at the bottom of this device is meant to be.

The other item is the extra lines added to the roof in the elevation drawing. These seem intended to modify the roof pitches, which are identical as drawn
originally. The designer seems to have realized that, from the ground, the surfaces of the upper roof would disappear from view as the observer moved
closer to the building while the lower ones would remain in view. To correct this, so that both roofs would be visible at a certain distance from the house,
and would disappear more or less simultaneously as the viewer drew near, the modification indicated would be necessary.

This could be proved easily, on this drawing, by extending the roof profiles toward the ground, to see where they would converge, in each case, at about
five feet above grade.

I believe I have detected a similar strategy visible on other Wright elevation drawings of the period . . .

S

Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

The pitch of both the upper and lower roofs is the same, both before and after the alteration. The edit seems only to reduce the roof as a whole. Notice that the chimney has been lowered, as well.

At the Blossom Garage, the pitch of the upper roof is substantially steeper than the lower roof, which makes the two elements seemingly equal in pitch as viewed from the street. I don't know if FLW did that trompe l'oeil gimmick anywhere else.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

The fact that the architect first drew the conventional condition, only to modify it upon reflection (perhaps after consulting the perspective view ?), indicates intent.

Another instance of an upper roof with a steeper pitch than the lower one: the garage to the Blossom residence.


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Roderick Grant
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Post by Roderick Grant »

I was reading the drawings incorrectly. At first, I thought he was lowering the pitch of the roofs, but he was actually raising the second floor pitch, similarly to the way he did Blossom.

Since Henderson and Hickox are essentially the same design, with only the roof differing on the exterior, is there evidence that he fiddled with the pitches on that one, too ... not to mention Bradley.

SDR
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Post by SDR »

Hickox no, Bradley yes, according to elevations in Monograph 1 . . .

S

Paul Ringstrom
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F. B. Henderson House - Elmhurst, IL - SOLD

Post by Paul Ringstrom »

F. B. Henderson House - Elmhurst, IL - SOLD $825,000

https://www.chicagobusiness.com/residen ... value-land
Owner of the G. Curtis Yelland House (1910), by Wm. Drummond

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