Article: Goetsch-Winckler House - Okemos, MI

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Roderick Grant
Posts: 10303
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

The metal in St. Mark's would have been copper with a patina, which would look fine with warm materials.

Roderick Grant
Posts: 10303
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 7:48 am

Post by Roderick Grant »

Arne Jacobsen, now there's an architect/designer who has yet to receive the notice he is due. Even his early work shows clean lines and elegant simplicity.

SDR
Posts: 19640
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:33 pm
Location: San Francisco

Post by SDR »

The world could do worse than to furnish itself entirely from the catalogs of Scandinavian designers and makers -- were such a monoculture ever made possible, or necessary . . .

The Hardoy Butterfly looks right at home at Fallingwater; the dull metal finish and natural leather sling are honest and unassuming. (That sling looks like it was fresh from the box and never yet sat upon, even by a temporarily-
exhausted docent. It needs breaking in . . .)

SDR

juankbedoya
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:30 am

Re:

Post by juankbedoya »

SDR wrote:
Sat Feb 24, 2018 7:46 pm
The "rough" quality of some early Usonians is precisely what makes the work so poignant, because it is paired with exquisitely abstracted and diagrammatic
formal design. In photos, at least, I prefer these houses to the carefully-crafted and more "finished" ones of the 'fifties.




Baird represents another example of this "crude" brickwork.


Image

© Futagawa, early 'nineties.


SDR
I love Baird house and by the way I hope there already exist some topic of this small gem...!!!

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