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Regional modernism

 
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:50 pm    Post subject: Regional modernism Reply with quote

Perhaps a new heading for Wright-era and Wright-influenced residential work is in order. Here's a Curbed page that includes ten names possibly worthy of notice -- including ready-made favorites Goff, Dow, the Dombars and Roger Lee.

The subject house by John S Chase carries a roof which might indicate a familiarity with East-coast architect Ulrich Franzen . . . if not with far-off master Le Corbusier.

https://www.curbed.com/2017/8/14/16136054/john-chase-midcentury-modern-architect-texas

Don't miss the link to the ten architects, early in the story. Only one house by each, but a starting point for further study . . . ?

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8417

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 1:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Four of the architects noted, O'Neal Ford, Arthur T. Brown, Vladimir Ossipoff and Paul Hayden Kirk, are of especial interest.

I went to school with the daughter-in-law of Winston and Elizabeth (nee Scheu) Close. Take a look at the 8/25/2017 issue of Curbed for a photo of the Internationalist design of their own house in Minneapolis. Elizabeth was daughter of Gustav Scheu, who built a house by Adolph Loos.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I become more impressed by Curbed as time goes on. These pages a full of useful and interesting references. I did come across Wright's name, somewhere in the mix; I'll have to go back and find that.

One thing is missing: identification of place. What state are we in, I find myself asking repeatedly.

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 10:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The first Chase house in the Curbed piece might owe something to Ulrich Franzen's own house of a decade earlier ?

https://www.docomomo-nytri.org/event/22/

https://www.docomomo-nytri.org/2012/10/18/ulrich-franzen-1921-2012/

SDR
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Matt



Joined: 25 Nov 2009
Posts: 383

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 9:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm writing a book on Paul Kirk...as there has never been one before. His work in the Puget Sound area is wonderful...Mies but with wood.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another one comes out of the woodwork . . . as it were.

https://www.google.com/search?q=paul+kirk+architect+seattle&client=opera&hs=p0w&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiNmdbSmaHbAhUCKH0KHUCKAo4QiR4IggE&biw=1854&bih=960

https://www.midcenturystyle.net/focus-on-architects-paul-kirk/

http://ounodesign.com/2009/03/14/guest-house-by-paul-hayden-kirk-in-seattle/

Looks like there's more than just International Style influence, here ?

SDR
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3513
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR:
Did you encounter the Franzen house in your youth in NY?
I've always liked that house for its clarity.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 11:12 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

My friend and I rode to it on our bicycles, only once, and didn't venture onto the property. I recall a lawn descending to the narrow road, at which there
was an old low stone "fence." Other old walls bounded the property, I think; I wonder now if this was an early homestead, within shouting distance of the
Sound (and the Max Hoffman house). A forested piece of coastal land. Current aerials seem to show the road has disappeared, leaving the house "stranded" ?

The best early pictures, mostly monochrome, were found in the Record Houses article . . .

The Beatty house of 1958, also in Rye, is better covered in available images: https://mcarch.wordpress.com/2014/12/27/beattie-residence-by-ulrich-franzen/

SDR
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Matt



Joined: 25 Nov 2009
Posts: 383

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 3:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

SDR, I'd welcome your thoughts on Kirk. There is a lot of the Mies module box going on here with his work. Another northwest architect, Paul Thiry was much more international style...as in the concrete work of Corbu.

There is an Asian influence in the Pacific Northwest, but I suspect it is Japan by way of the Bay Area. The "northwest modern" style kicked off with Yeon and Belluschi in Portland and they seemed to be channelling Wurster and Maybeck.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 6:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

No student of architecture, in exploring Western and Northwestern modernism and its roots, should proceed without absorbing the existing
literature and some of its givens, including the First, Second, and Third Bay Traditions.

Wikipedia provides very brief descriptions of the three, with examples. I don't see any outright lies on these pages; at worst they may suffer only
from omission -- and the omissions may be found in the original definitions of the three phases or eras, rather than in what's reported here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_Bay_Tradition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Bay_Tradition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Third_Bay_Tradition

Following up on the names of practitioners that are linked on those pages would reward the reader with examples, and with the seeds of further
individual studies.


Then, no student will be up to speed without references like "Bay Area Style: San Francisco Bay Region Houses" (Weingarten, Weintraub; 2004),
"NorCalMod -- Icons of Northern California Modernism" (Pierluigi Serraino; 2006), and "Forgotten Modern: California Houses 1940-1970" (Hess,
Weintraub; 2007). (Some of these books are available at great prices, online, or at your local new and used bookstore.) Earlier studies are perhaps
even more valuable, to establish the history and to suggest sources of the scholarship that followed. The newer books are often more generously
illustrated, and may be expected to contain variants upon the original definitions as well as previously-neglected names, or examples of work.

Finally, the various editions of the full-spectrum architecture guides that were produced from the early 1970's on, in or for major cities of the Northwest,
will be useful both for the seeker and the scholar. The series includes and perhaps stems from Gebhard, Montgomery, Winter and Woodbridge, for
Peregrine Smith, in 1973: "A Guide to Architecture in San Francisco and Northern California." Later editions are useful if generally less generous
in the number of citations. (The Los Angeles and Southern California volume by the same authors appeared in 1977.)

The Asian influence (and that from the East and from Europe) can be traced through these accounts. The extent to which Bay Area work influenced
that found in Oregon and Washington -- for instance -- will be explored using sources in addition to those mentioned here.

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 6:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As for Kirk: I suggest the same sort of search. The brief bio found in my second link provides the outlines of a career, including its phases and their
physical manifestations -- and influences. Yes, I see the European Glazed Box there, but also some clearly Eichler-like examples and the previously-
mentioned Asian strain. Where does Cliff May fit in, or Belluschi, Yeon and the others you named ? A very interesting field of study, as I see it, and
generally under-reported ?

https://www.midcenturystyle.net/focus-on-architects-paul-kirk/

I leave it to others, including you, to broaden the search, to verify or modify what's given so far, and to tell us where Kirk fits into the Northwest tradition,
decade by decade . . .

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 7:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't even know where this house is located (little help, somebody ? I came west with no Spanish under my belt, sadly) -- but it looks like it would be at home in the Northwest. And dig that sweet deck "railing" . . .

http://www.mpgarquitetura.com.br/pt/projeto/residencia-gn-2/

SDR
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DRN



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3513
Location: Cherry Hill, NJ

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 9:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The house linked is in Brazil...RJ is the abbreviation for the state of Rio de Janeiro. The underlying steel pipe structure is slick.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15934
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri May 25, 2018 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think so. And the big slatted canopy is cable-suspended ? Quite a tour-de-force, altogether, in a calm sort of way (that would be invisible to the occupants).

I'm always grateful for moral support for my favored terrace railing-substitute strategy. This will do quite nicely . . .

SDR
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