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Article: Apprentice Robert Green
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DavidC



Joined: 02 Sep 2006
Posts: 6439
Location: Oak Ridge, TN

PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 4:45 pm    Post subject: Article: Apprentice Robert Green Reply with quote

Robert Green, Atlanta’s forgotten master of modern architecture


David
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Thu Jan 25, 2018 7:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hoo boy. Green's work is a gift that keeps on giving. The Copeland house looks better and better, and here's a new one (to me): the Kingloff house.

http://www.georgiaassociatedrealty.com/3905-parian-ridge-road-nw-atlanta-ga-30327/


This one has been glitzed and glammed -- maybe by the first owner ? -- but the bones are good in any event. The big bedroom is hardly intimate or cozy, and the smaller one gets a little Goffy (no, not "goofy") in the windows ?


SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8414

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 4:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Kingloff was posted extensively before the collapse.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The collapse -- of Wright Chat ? Of the Confederacy ? I'm struggling here . . .

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 881
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 8:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Even though the Confederacy did in fact collapse just a few miles away, I don't think Kingloff was much related to the occurrence.

I've been thru all four of the houses in the article, and the Kingloff House is an outlier. The other three are the first houses Green designed after leaving Taliesin, done between 1960 - 63, and they all are rather consistent-- none contain any sheetrock (two are paneled throughout with redwood and one with cypress), and their windows and doors were handmade of the same wood as the rest of the house.
The Kingloff House came along 20 years later, in the 1980's, and is more standardized in its components (factory brand windows & doors, mostly sheetrock, etc.) Organic, or even modern, architecture was decidedly "out" and Green was conforming a bit to the conventional house building trades, resulting in a bit less of an avant garde thing.

This aerial shows its context amongst the faux chateaux which proliferated in that era.

In addition to its more conventional palette of materials, it does appear to have been "glitzed" up by an owner, either originally and/or in an "update". The real estate photography, however, exaggerates with overly bright lighting and an extra wide angle lens. Here's the real estate photo:


Here's a snapshot with scale figures showing more what it feels like when you're there:
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Oh, it's endlessly interesting to compare photos taken of a single subject: among many others, we can see how different camera placements, lenses and their settings will alter appearances -- and that's before lighting, and (not least) changes to the architecture and the decor !

In the realtor shot there appear to be mirrors on the walls nearer the camera, with doors floating in them. Ditto, more mirrors near the further doors ? Or am I confused (once again) . . .

Which photo was shot from a normal standing height ? James, are you quite tall ?

SDR
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
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Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay -- I took a Dollhouse tour; now I get what I was seeing. Not doors, but paneled diagonal piers, in the LR. Pretty interesting sequence: take the visitor into the center of the plan, a stone-paved and skylit mini-garden, then travel in any direction from there.

And I love that living room "vessel." Definitely Wrightian; definitely "other." Imagine Green (Robert) and Green (Aaron) getting together, at least for a while or as a side gig; they'd be a new Greene & Greene !

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 881
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

that realtor's photo was taken from about 2 feet from the floor and the wide angle lens cone of view is practically looking sideways, showing way more into the adjacent spaces than one's peripheral vision would take in.
The mirrors added to the wood-clad piers are unfortunate because they dissolve the appearance of the structure.

With the new paradigm of internet real estate sites, we will be occasionally treated to photos inside Wright houses, when they happen to come on the market. Unfortunately, instead of being photographed by Stoller or Korab or Futagawa, years from now subsequent Wright Chat enthusiasts will be trying to decipher the realities of these building by looking at overly lit & distorted images taken by realtor photographers. They'll have their work cut out for them.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 9:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes. But in this case, as I've just found out, an improved self-guided 3D tour such as is available for this house, provides more intimate and (I guess)
realistic images than the photos do, with the bonus of an immediate understanding of the relationship of space to space.

Lots of stucco and textured sheetrock, not my favorites -- but adequate wood and stone to convince, and luxuries like day and night dining rooms, of roughly
equal size; a generous bar off the living room, a conveniently placed master suite, and interesting bedrooms.

Creamy and warm (or olive-y and cool) wall colors (though the deck soffits need to be off-white, for daylight penetration ?), and the removal of mirrors,
would help. Keep that kitchen, including the floor, no ?

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 881
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

For the record I'm about 6'-1". I think those scale figures are shrimps. I took that snapshot with my iPhone.
My memory of the inside of that house was that its configuration was interesting and complex, as were the volumetric things going on. Less good, I don't recall liking anything much about the material palette.
Much was uninteresting: smooth or textured sheetrock; generic wood flooring; garden variety fixtures, fittings, hardware, diffusers, etc.
A lot was too shiny or reflective. The stonework, also generic, seemed more of an adhered veneer than authentic gravity bearing construction. And the triangular windows and skylights were too graphic. I had a yearning to see it stripped of all finishes and replaced with fewer, less glossy, more authentic materials.
I bet it was difficult to avoid the default path of least resistance in the 1980's that pulled one toward mass-produced building components, as well as the stylistic pull of either neo-traditional or PoMo aesthetics.


Last edited by JChoate on Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:10 pm; edited 1 time in total
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
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Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Green & Green -- good one.

I took a tour of the Gamble House last month, which is a complete masterpiece, but one thing it's not is shiny. And when it comes to components and fittings it's the opposite of generic and conventional. Perhaps, that's why they added the more exotic "e" to the end of the name.
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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Handmade" comes off of that kind of work, in spades, I think. Sort of like I imagine the European Art Nouveau architect's work feels like, or Mackintosh or even Aalto -- for instance ?

SDR
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JChoate



Joined: 04 Feb 2016
Posts: 881
Location: Atlanta

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep.

But in the gap between those unique works of high art by Aalto, Mackintosh and the like, there's plenty of room for just nudging things away from generic.

While the conventional, shiny, and predictable finishes of the Kingloff house don't appeal to me, Green's early work does because the palettes were simpler, but the materials were truer. And the basic handcraft of components out of the same simple materials is quieter and more basic.

Contrasting with the gloss of Kingloff are these snapshots inside the empty Malone house (1962):




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SDR



Joined: 17 Jun 2006
Posts: 15930
Location: San Francisco

PostPosted: Fri Jan 26, 2018 11:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You just made my night. It's difficult to understand why this kind of building doesn't get more traction. Could it be that a critical mass was never reached, with enough people exposed first-hand to it that it could have become more of a norm ?

Don't answer that -- I don't want to hear about how it costs more per foot, or that commercial interests don't support it, or that everybody probably feels the way I do, about their favorite kind of environment . . .

I wonder if Robert Green ever saw Schindler's work. Any record of him visiting California ? When did H H Harris migrate to North Carolina ? What else do we see in the Malone house -- besides the obvious ?

Look at him lining up his block and board courses -- in a way I don't believe Wright did (why -- because it equates two disparate materials a bit too closely ?) -- and making a sort of dentil course at the top. This painted block doesn't displease; is it just the right color, do you think ?

To say nothing of the spacial richness . . . Is there glass in that bathroom skylight ?

SDR
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Roderick Grant



Joined: 29 Mar 2006
Posts: 8414

PostPosted: Sat Jan 27, 2018 1:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Malone: Mmmmmmm! Love the light fixture worked into the railing.
Kingloff: Not so much. Glossy or not, that stone alcove opposite the living room fireplace is architecturally wrong!
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